Tea Flavonoids: New Evidence Suggests They Are Active in The Human Body And May Help Maintain Cardiovascular Health

New Studies Indicate That Drinking Black Tea May Be Good for The Heart



Apr 27, 2001, 01:00 ET from Lipton Tea

    TENERIFE, CANARY ISLANDS, SPAIN, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- New research
 presented at the European Cooperation in the Field of Science and Technology
 Conference has added to the growing body of evidence that suggests drinking
 black tea may provide cardiovascular health benefits.
     During a presentation entitled, "The effect of tea consumption on markers
 of oxidative damage and cardiovascular health in humans," Dr. Sheila Wiseman,
 Unilever Health Institute, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands, stated, "This latest
 evidence indicates that black tea flavonoids decrease markers of oxidative
 damage and promote endothelial function in the human body, which are important
 factors in maintaining good cardiovascular health."(1)
     The beneficial health effects of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables are
 thought to be partly due to their antioxidant components.  Epidemiological
 studies have shown that there is a relationship between a decreased risk of
 coronary heart disease (CHD) and dietary intake of flavonoids (one type of
 dietary antioxidant) from fruits, vegetables and red wine.(2)  In addition,
 studies also have shown an association between black tea consumption and a
 decreased risk of CHD.(3)
     Dr. Wiseman reviewed results of four new research studies:
 
     -- Dr. Roodenburg and colleagues, Unilever Health Institute, Vlaardingen,
        compared the antioxidant activity of green and black tea with water,
        vitamin C and orange juice in 120 subjects (24 per group).  They found
        that the increase in plasma antioxidant activity was significantly
        greater with two cups (300ml) of either green or black tea than with
        two glasses (300ml) of fresh orange juice and a vitamin C solution of
        120mg in 300ml water.
 
     -- A 12-week study conducted by Dr. Wiseman, found that non-smoking, post-
        menopausal women who drank eight cups of green and black tea per day
        had a significant increase in plasma catechins.  A reduction in markers
        of lipid oxidation and DNA modification was seen with green tea.  In
        addition, plasma cholesterol levels were significantly reduced with
        green tea and, although not significant, a similar trend was seen with
        black tea.
 
     -- Another study by Myron Gross, PhD, University of Minnesota,
        Minneapolis, examined the effects of black tea consumption (six cups
        per day) on platelet function and markers of oxidative damage in a
        four-week study in smokers.  Black tea was associated with a
        significant reduction in markers of lipid oxidation in smoking subjects
        and also with a significant reduction in platelet clotting.(4)
 
     -- A four-week study conducted by Joseph Vita, MD, Boston University
        School of Medicine, found that coronary heart disease patients who
        drank four cups of black tea per day significantly improved their
        endothelial function (measured as brachial artery flow
        mediated vasodilation) and restored arterial vasodilatory capacity to
        normal values.(5)
 
     These new research results support the many studies in experimental models
 which indicate the beneficial effects of tea and the epidemiological data that
 suggests a benefit of tea consumption on cardiovascular health.  Increased
 understanding of the bioavailability and metabolism of black tea flavonoids,
 and methodologies to detect them in humans, will enable full elucidation of
 their antioxidant function and cardiovascular health benefits.  More research,
 especially human clinical studies, will be needed to establish the effect of
 tea consumption on cardiovascular disease.
     "The results from these latest clinical studies of black tea support the
 idea that tea flavonoids act as antioxidants and promote healthy endothelial
 and platelet function in the human body," concluded Dr. Wiseman.
 
     (1) Wiseman S et al. The effect of tea consumption on markers of
         oxidative damage and cardiovascular health in humans. COST 916
         Conference, Bioactive compounds in plant foods, Tenerife, Canary
         Islands, Spain. 26 - 8 April, 2001; Selected Communication.
     (2) Yochum L et al. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of cardiovascular
         disease in postmenopausal women. Am J Epidemiol 1999;149:943 - 9.
     (3) Sesso HD et al. Coffee and tea intake and the risk of myocardial
         infarction. Am J Epidemiol 1999;149:162_7.
     (4) Gross M, Thyagarajan B, Key N, et al. Black Tea Reduces Platelet
         Aggregation and P-Selectin Concentrations in Human Subjects. Dept. of
         Laboratory and Pathology, Dept. of Hematology and Div. of
         Epidemiology, University of Minnesota and Dept. of Hematology and
         Oncology, Veterans Administration, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Abstract
         presented at Am College of Cardiology 2001.
     (5) Vita JA, Duffy SJ, Keaney JF, et al.  Acute and Chronic Tea
         Consumption Reverses Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Coronary
         Artery Disease. Accepted for publication in Circulation.  2001.
 
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SOURCE Lipton Tea
    TENERIFE, CANARY ISLANDS, SPAIN, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- New research
 presented at the European Cooperation in the Field of Science and Technology
 Conference has added to the growing body of evidence that suggests drinking
 black tea may provide cardiovascular health benefits.
     During a presentation entitled, "The effect of tea consumption on markers
 of oxidative damage and cardiovascular health in humans," Dr. Sheila Wiseman,
 Unilever Health Institute, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands, stated, "This latest
 evidence indicates that black tea flavonoids decrease markers of oxidative
 damage and promote endothelial function in the human body, which are important
 factors in maintaining good cardiovascular health."(1)
     The beneficial health effects of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables are
 thought to be partly due to their antioxidant components.  Epidemiological
 studies have shown that there is a relationship between a decreased risk of
 coronary heart disease (CHD) and dietary intake of flavonoids (one type of
 dietary antioxidant) from fruits, vegetables and red wine.(2)  In addition,
 studies also have shown an association between black tea consumption and a
 decreased risk of CHD.(3)
     Dr. Wiseman reviewed results of four new research studies:
 
     -- Dr. Roodenburg and colleagues, Unilever Health Institute, Vlaardingen,
        compared the antioxidant activity of green and black tea with water,
        vitamin C and orange juice in 120 subjects (24 per group).  They found
        that the increase in plasma antioxidant activity was significantly
        greater with two cups (300ml) of either green or black tea than with
        two glasses (300ml) of fresh orange juice and a vitamin C solution of
        120mg in 300ml water.
 
     -- A 12-week study conducted by Dr. Wiseman, found that non-smoking, post-
        menopausal women who drank eight cups of green and black tea per day
        had a significant increase in plasma catechins.  A reduction in markers
        of lipid oxidation and DNA modification was seen with green tea.  In
        addition, plasma cholesterol levels were significantly reduced with
        green tea and, although not significant, a similar trend was seen with
        black tea.
 
     -- Another study by Myron Gross, PhD, University of Minnesota,
        Minneapolis, examined the effects of black tea consumption (six cups
        per day) on platelet function and markers of oxidative damage in a
        four-week study in smokers.  Black tea was associated with a
        significant reduction in markers of lipid oxidation in smoking subjects
        and also with a significant reduction in platelet clotting.(4)
 
     -- A four-week study conducted by Joseph Vita, MD, Boston University
        School of Medicine, found that coronary heart disease patients who
        drank four cups of black tea per day significantly improved their
        endothelial function (measured as brachial artery flow
        mediated vasodilation) and restored arterial vasodilatory capacity to
        normal values.(5)
 
     These new research results support the many studies in experimental models
 which indicate the beneficial effects of tea and the epidemiological data that
 suggests a benefit of tea consumption on cardiovascular health.  Increased
 understanding of the bioavailability and metabolism of black tea flavonoids,
 and methodologies to detect them in humans, will enable full elucidation of
 their antioxidant function and cardiovascular health benefits.  More research,
 especially human clinical studies, will be needed to establish the effect of
 tea consumption on cardiovascular disease.
     "The results from these latest clinical studies of black tea support the
 idea that tea flavonoids act as antioxidants and promote healthy endothelial
 and platelet function in the human body," concluded Dr. Wiseman.
 
     (1) Wiseman S et al. The effect of tea consumption on markers of
         oxidative damage and cardiovascular health in humans. COST 916
         Conference, Bioactive compounds in plant foods, Tenerife, Canary
         Islands, Spain. 26 - 8 April, 2001; Selected Communication.
     (2) Yochum L et al. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of cardiovascular
         disease in postmenopausal women. Am J Epidemiol 1999;149:943 - 9.
     (3) Sesso HD et al. Coffee and tea intake and the risk of myocardial
         infarction. Am J Epidemiol 1999;149:162_7.
     (4) Gross M, Thyagarajan B, Key N, et al. Black Tea Reduces Platelet
         Aggregation and P-Selectin Concentrations in Human Subjects. Dept. of
         Laboratory and Pathology, Dept. of Hematology and Div. of
         Epidemiology, University of Minnesota and Dept. of Hematology and
         Oncology, Veterans Administration, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Abstract
         presented at Am College of Cardiology 2001.
     (5) Vita JA, Duffy SJ, Keaney JF, et al.  Acute and Chronic Tea
         Consumption Reverses Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Coronary
         Artery Disease. Accepted for publication in Circulation.  2001.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X14443123
 
 SOURCE  Lipton Tea