Teaching Reading is Like Dieting

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from High/Scope(R) Educational Research Foundation

    YPSILANTI, Mich., April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 Reading is widely recognized as one of the most important skills we can teach
 children to insure their success in school and in life.  Indeed, the debate
 raging today concerns how children best learn to read, not whether reading is
 important.
     "The teaching of reading generates as many fads as dieting does," says Dr.
 Arthur Stellar, president and chief executive officer of High/Scope
 Educational Research Foundation.  "To lose weight permanently, one must reduce
 calories, exercise, and maintain a balanced diet.  To learn to read well, one
 must build up vocabulary, master phonics and ways to figure out the meaning of
 words, and engage the brain for comprehension," he added.
     "Reading and diets have in common other traits or factors that affect
 success, such as self-esteem, motivation, and the need for practice," Stellar
 further noted.  "In addition, both have in common claims of quick fixes such
 as how to lose 10 pounds in a week or how to teach a child to read in 6 weeks
 with just 20 minutes of practice a day.  In the end, long-term success in both
 reading and dieting is achieved by following scientific research findings and
 maintaining balance," he concluded.
 
     Many early reading programs are available, some better than others.
     Balanced reading programs draw from a variety of reading approaches, but
 some programs currently in vogue rely on scripted lessons that stress rote
 memorization and student drill and practice.  Studies show that children whose
 learning is limited to such didactic instruction fail to develop the deep
 comprehension skills that are the ultimate goal of reading, as well as an
 appreciation for wanting to read.
 
     There is a better approach.
     There are reading programs that produce both proficient decoders and avid
 readers with high comprehension levels.  In one method, the High/Scope "active
 learning" approach, adults guide and support children through all the key
 experiences they need to become fully literate -- speaking, listening,
 reading, and writing.  Through a balance of child- and adult-initiated
 learning experiences, children develop not only the skills they need to read
 but also the ability to apply these skills in a variety of educational
 contexts.
 
     Free reading papers are available.
     Decades of rigorous scientific research from infancy through adulthood
 confirm that High/Scope's balanced methods foster a love of reading, help
 children succeed in school, and result in literate and productive citizens.
 Based on these findings, the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation has
 developed a series of position papers on how young children become competent
 and enthusiastic readers in infant-toddler, preschool, and early elementary
 programs.  The papers describe the active learning process, the general
 instructional strategies used by High/Scope-trained adults, and the research
 findings that demonstrate our accountability in teaching young children to
 read.
     To obtain free copies of these papers -
     Visit our Web site:  www.highscope.org
     Contact us via e-mail:  reading@highscope.org
     Call us:  734-485-2000
     Fax us:  734-485-4467
     Write:  High/Scope Educational Research Foundation
             600 N. River Street
             Ypsilanti, MI   48198
 
     The High/Scope(R) Educational Research Foundation, an independent
 nonprofit research, development, training, publishing, and public advocacy
 organization located in Ypsilanti, Michigan, was founded in 1970.  The
 Foundation's principal goals are to promote the learning and development of
 children worldwide from infancy through adolescence and to support and train
 educators and parents as they help children learn.  In a High/Scope program,
 students learn through active involvement with people, materials, events, and
 ideas.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X96183527
 
 

SOURCE High/Scope(R) Educational Research Foundation
    YPSILANTI, Mich., April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 Reading is widely recognized as one of the most important skills we can teach
 children to insure their success in school and in life.  Indeed, the debate
 raging today concerns how children best learn to read, not whether reading is
 important.
     "The teaching of reading generates as many fads as dieting does," says Dr.
 Arthur Stellar, president and chief executive officer of High/Scope
 Educational Research Foundation.  "To lose weight permanently, one must reduce
 calories, exercise, and maintain a balanced diet.  To learn to read well, one
 must build up vocabulary, master phonics and ways to figure out the meaning of
 words, and engage the brain for comprehension," he added.
     "Reading and diets have in common other traits or factors that affect
 success, such as self-esteem, motivation, and the need for practice," Stellar
 further noted.  "In addition, both have in common claims of quick fixes such
 as how to lose 10 pounds in a week or how to teach a child to read in 6 weeks
 with just 20 minutes of practice a day.  In the end, long-term success in both
 reading and dieting is achieved by following scientific research findings and
 maintaining balance," he concluded.
 
     Many early reading programs are available, some better than others.
     Balanced reading programs draw from a variety of reading approaches, but
 some programs currently in vogue rely on scripted lessons that stress rote
 memorization and student drill and practice.  Studies show that children whose
 learning is limited to such didactic instruction fail to develop the deep
 comprehension skills that are the ultimate goal of reading, as well as an
 appreciation for wanting to read.
 
     There is a better approach.
     There are reading programs that produce both proficient decoders and avid
 readers with high comprehension levels.  In one method, the High/Scope "active
 learning" approach, adults guide and support children through all the key
 experiences they need to become fully literate -- speaking, listening,
 reading, and writing.  Through a balance of child- and adult-initiated
 learning experiences, children develop not only the skills they need to read
 but also the ability to apply these skills in a variety of educational
 contexts.
 
     Free reading papers are available.
     Decades of rigorous scientific research from infancy through adulthood
 confirm that High/Scope's balanced methods foster a love of reading, help
 children succeed in school, and result in literate and productive citizens.
 Based on these findings, the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation has
 developed a series of position papers on how young children become competent
 and enthusiastic readers in infant-toddler, preschool, and early elementary
 programs.  The papers describe the active learning process, the general
 instructional strategies used by High/Scope-trained adults, and the research
 findings that demonstrate our accountability in teaching young children to
 read.
     To obtain free copies of these papers -
     Visit our Web site:  www.highscope.org
     Contact us via e-mail:  reading@highscope.org
     Call us:  734-485-2000
     Fax us:  734-485-4467
     Write:  High/Scope Educational Research Foundation
             600 N. River Street
             Ypsilanti, MI   48198
 
     The High/Scope(R) Educational Research Foundation, an independent
 nonprofit research, development, training, publishing, and public advocacy
 organization located in Ypsilanti, Michigan, was founded in 1970.  The
 Foundation's principal goals are to promote the learning and development of
 children worldwide from infancy through adolescence and to support and train
 educators and parents as they help children learn.  In a High/Scope program,
 students learn through active involvement with people, materials, events, and
 ideas.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X96183527
 
 SOURCE  High/Scope(R) Educational Research Foundation