Technology Recycling Tells Businesses Seeking to Dispose of High-tech Junk: Ask Questions, Watch Privacy Concerns, Check Industry-specific Regulations

Nation's Largest Computer Recycler Offers Business Advice About

Computer Disposal and Recycling in Honor of Earth Day 2001



Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from Technology Recycling

    DENVER, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- In honor of Earth Day 2001, Technology
 Recycling (www.techrecycle.com), a firm that helps businesses nationwide
 dispose of obsolete computer and office equipment in an environmentally
 responsible manner, today released a series of guidelines for businesses that
 need to dispose of obsolete computers and office equipment.  Specifically,
 Technology Recycling has outlined five key areas of concerns that businesses
 should research, before making decisions about how to handle and dispose of
 high-tech junk.
     The proper disposal of obsolete electronics and office equipment poses one
 of the largest environmental and waste management problems, according to Bob
 Knowles, president and founder of Technology Recycling.  Although the problem
 has been in existence for the past 15-20 years, it is only now coming to the
 forefront of awareness, due to the sheer volume of computers and office
 equipment in production.
     According to IDC (www.idc.com), more than 130 million personal computers
 were shipped worldwide in the year 2000.  All of these systems, plus systems
 already manufactured during the past 20 years, will require proper disposal --
 as obsolete computer systems and office equipment pose both a solid waste
 problem and a hazardous waste problem.
     Of note, computers contain significant levels of hazardous materials,
 including lead and cadmium, thus requiring proper disposal vs. throwing them
 into landfills, where toxic substances can leach into air, soil and
 groundwater.
     "It's no secret that obsolete computers and office equipment pose a huge
 environmental problem.  The secret is in knowing how to handle the problem,
 and past solutions such as donations and refurbishing are not viable options,"
 noted Knowles.  "The only way to solve the problem of computer and electronics
 disposal is to truly dispose of the systems and recycle metals, plastic and
 glass for re-use.
     "If businesses donate or refurbish old systems for sale, they are still
 not addressing what to do with the systems at their end of life," Knowles
 explained.
     With all this in mind, Technology Recycling offers some basic guidelines
 for businesses, on how to responsibly get rid of high-tech junk.
 
     Top 5 Areas of Concern/Advice for Businesses with High-tech Junk
     1. Ask very specific questions of companies claiming to "recycle"
 computers.
     Businesses should ask the following: "What's really going to happen to my
 old computer systems?:  The term "computer recycling" is used very loosely to
 describe anything from true disposal of the systems to donations and
 refurbishing.  Unless the systems are destroyed and broken down for re-use of
 materials, they are typically refurbished, resold, or exported, which still
 results in the problem of how to dispose of obsolete technology.
 
     2. Review software licensing issues and liabilities.
     Businesses that get rid of obsolete computers often fail to address
 software licensing issues.  For example, systems that are donated or sent off
 for refurbishing often still contain copyrighted software.  Companies that
 fail to remove software from systems before they are donated or refurbished
 usually are in violation of software agreements.
 
     3. Beware of hazardous waste liability.
     Companies that simply throw systems away in large quantities can be traced
 by the serial numbers on the components, and can be held liable for hazardous
 waste violations.  Currently, the manufacturer is not considered the generator
 of obsolete computers that are improperly dumped.  The entity that owned the
 systems when they became obsolete is considered the hazardous waste generator.
 
     4. Protect proprietary company information.
     Most computer systems owned by businesses contain proprietary company
 information, including financial, customer and proprietary technology data.
 Many affordable computer utilities allow for the retrieval of information that
 supposedly has been deleted from hard drives.  Companies that want to protect
 proprietary information and still get rid of high-tech junk should make sure
 the hard drives of obsolete systems are destroyed to protect proprietary
 information from falling into the wrong hands.
 
     5. Research industry-specific regulations that affect computer disposal
 decisions.
     Since privacy is becoming an increasingly important concern, a variety of
 laws have been enacted that are designed to protect privacy, particularly of
 customers and patients.  Businesses seeking to recycle old computers should
 make sure their disposal decisions keep them in compliance with
 industry-specific privacy regulations.  Medical businesses, labs and doctor's
 offices, for example, need to make sure that private medical records of
 patients are not revealed if they donate or refurbish old computers.
 
     About Technology Recycling
     Founded in mid-1998, Technology Recycling helps businesses recycle/dispose
 of obsolete computer systems and other high-tech junk in an environmentally
 responsible manner, and according to EPA standards.  The company is based in
 Denver, Colo., and provides technology recycling services in the lower 48
 states of the United States.  Since its founding, Technology Recycling has
 collected and disposed of approximately 100 tons of obsolete computer systems;
 developed national accounts with Fortune 500 companies; and achieved
 "preferred vendor" status in a dozen states.  The company can be reached at:
 Technology Recycling, Metropoint I, 4600 Ulster St., Suite 700, Denver, CO
 80237-2882, (303) 766-9608, (800) 803-5442, FAX (303) 766-4453,
 www.techrecycle.com, Email: rhk@techrecycle.com.
 
 

SOURCE Technology Recycling
    DENVER, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- In honor of Earth Day 2001, Technology
 Recycling (www.techrecycle.com), a firm that helps businesses nationwide
 dispose of obsolete computer and office equipment in an environmentally
 responsible manner, today released a series of guidelines for businesses that
 need to dispose of obsolete computers and office equipment.  Specifically,
 Technology Recycling has outlined five key areas of concerns that businesses
 should research, before making decisions about how to handle and dispose of
 high-tech junk.
     The proper disposal of obsolete electronics and office equipment poses one
 of the largest environmental and waste management problems, according to Bob
 Knowles, president and founder of Technology Recycling.  Although the problem
 has been in existence for the past 15-20 years, it is only now coming to the
 forefront of awareness, due to the sheer volume of computers and office
 equipment in production.
     According to IDC (www.idc.com), more than 130 million personal computers
 were shipped worldwide in the year 2000.  All of these systems, plus systems
 already manufactured during the past 20 years, will require proper disposal --
 as obsolete computer systems and office equipment pose both a solid waste
 problem and a hazardous waste problem.
     Of note, computers contain significant levels of hazardous materials,
 including lead and cadmium, thus requiring proper disposal vs. throwing them
 into landfills, where toxic substances can leach into air, soil and
 groundwater.
     "It's no secret that obsolete computers and office equipment pose a huge
 environmental problem.  The secret is in knowing how to handle the problem,
 and past solutions such as donations and refurbishing are not viable options,"
 noted Knowles.  "The only way to solve the problem of computer and electronics
 disposal is to truly dispose of the systems and recycle metals, plastic and
 glass for re-use.
     "If businesses donate or refurbish old systems for sale, they are still
 not addressing what to do with the systems at their end of life," Knowles
 explained.
     With all this in mind, Technology Recycling offers some basic guidelines
 for businesses, on how to responsibly get rid of high-tech junk.
 
     Top 5 Areas of Concern/Advice for Businesses with High-tech Junk
     1. Ask very specific questions of companies claiming to "recycle"
 computers.
     Businesses should ask the following: "What's really going to happen to my
 old computer systems?:  The term "computer recycling" is used very loosely to
 describe anything from true disposal of the systems to donations and
 refurbishing.  Unless the systems are destroyed and broken down for re-use of
 materials, they are typically refurbished, resold, or exported, which still
 results in the problem of how to dispose of obsolete technology.
 
     2. Review software licensing issues and liabilities.
     Businesses that get rid of obsolete computers often fail to address
 software licensing issues.  For example, systems that are donated or sent off
 for refurbishing often still contain copyrighted software.  Companies that
 fail to remove software from systems before they are donated or refurbished
 usually are in violation of software agreements.
 
     3. Beware of hazardous waste liability.
     Companies that simply throw systems away in large quantities can be traced
 by the serial numbers on the components, and can be held liable for hazardous
 waste violations.  Currently, the manufacturer is not considered the generator
 of obsolete computers that are improperly dumped.  The entity that owned the
 systems when they became obsolete is considered the hazardous waste generator.
 
     4. Protect proprietary company information.
     Most computer systems owned by businesses contain proprietary company
 information, including financial, customer and proprietary technology data.
 Many affordable computer utilities allow for the retrieval of information that
 supposedly has been deleted from hard drives.  Companies that want to protect
 proprietary information and still get rid of high-tech junk should make sure
 the hard drives of obsolete systems are destroyed to protect proprietary
 information from falling into the wrong hands.
 
     5. Research industry-specific regulations that affect computer disposal
 decisions.
     Since privacy is becoming an increasingly important concern, a variety of
 laws have been enacted that are designed to protect privacy, particularly of
 customers and patients.  Businesses seeking to recycle old computers should
 make sure their disposal decisions keep them in compliance with
 industry-specific privacy regulations.  Medical businesses, labs and doctor's
 offices, for example, need to make sure that private medical records of
 patients are not revealed if they donate or refurbish old computers.
 
     About Technology Recycling
     Founded in mid-1998, Technology Recycling helps businesses recycle/dispose
 of obsolete computer systems and other high-tech junk in an environmentally
 responsible manner, and according to EPA standards.  The company is based in
 Denver, Colo., and provides technology recycling services in the lower 48
 states of the United States.  Since its founding, Technology Recycling has
 collected and disposed of approximately 100 tons of obsolete computer systems;
 developed national accounts with Fortune 500 companies; and achieved
 "preferred vendor" status in a dozen states.  The company can be reached at:
 Technology Recycling, Metropoint I, 4600 Ulster St., Suite 700, Denver, CO
 80237-2882, (303) 766-9608, (800) 803-5442, FAX (303) 766-4453,
 www.techrecycle.com, Email: rhk@techrecycle.com.
 
 SOURCE  Technology Recycling