The American Podiatric Medical Association Offers Foot Health Tips (April is Foot Health Month)

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Podiatric Medical Association

    BETHESDA, Md., April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Do your feet hurt? Chances are they
 do or they will some time in the future. Studies show that 75 percent of
 Americans will experience foot health problems at some point in their lives.
 Yet, over half of Americans believe that foot pain is normal and do little to
 stop or prevent it. That is why the American Podiatric Medical Association
 (APMA) has declared April as Foot Health Awareness Month -- to draw attention
 to this often-neglected, yet hardworking part of the body.
     "We want to emphasize that feet are not supposed to hurt. And if they do,
 it is important to seek a consultation with a podiatric physician," said Glenn
 Gastwirth, DPM, executive director, APMA.
 
     To emphasize the importance of preventative care, the APMA has compiled
 some important foot health tips, such as:
 
     *  Don't ignore foot pain -- it's not normal. If the pain persists, see a
        podiatric physician.
     *  Inspect your feet regularly. Pay attention to changes in color and
        temperature of your feet. Look for thick or discolored nails (a sign of
        developing fungus), and check for cracks or cuts in the skin.
     *  Wash your feet regularly, especially between the toes, and be sure to
        dry them completely.
     *  Trim toenails straight across, but not too short. Be careful not to cut
        nails in corners or on the sides; it can lead to ingrown toenails.
     *  Make sure that your shoes fit properly. Purchase new shoes later in the
        day when feet tend to be at their largest and replace worn out shoes as
        soon as possible.
     *  Select and wear the right shoe for the activity you are engaged in
        (i.e. running shoes for running).
     *  Alternate shoes -- don't wear the same pair of shoes every day.
     *  Avoid walking barefooted -- your feet will be more prone to injury and
        infection. At the beach or when wearing sandals always use sunblock on
        your feet as on the rest of your body.
     *  Be cautious when using home remedies for foot aliments; self-treatment
        can often turn a minor problem into a major one.
     *  If you are a person with diabetes it is vital that you see a podiatric
        physician at least once a year for a check-up.
 
     For more information on foot health please visit http://www.apma.org or
 call 1-800-FOOTCARE.
 
 

SOURCE American Podiatric Medical Association
    BETHESDA, Md., April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Do your feet hurt? Chances are they
 do or they will some time in the future. Studies show that 75 percent of
 Americans will experience foot health problems at some point in their lives.
 Yet, over half of Americans believe that foot pain is normal and do little to
 stop or prevent it. That is why the American Podiatric Medical Association
 (APMA) has declared April as Foot Health Awareness Month -- to draw attention
 to this often-neglected, yet hardworking part of the body.
     "We want to emphasize that feet are not supposed to hurt. And if they do,
 it is important to seek a consultation with a podiatric physician," said Glenn
 Gastwirth, DPM, executive director, APMA.
 
     To emphasize the importance of preventative care, the APMA has compiled
 some important foot health tips, such as:
 
     *  Don't ignore foot pain -- it's not normal. If the pain persists, see a
        podiatric physician.
     *  Inspect your feet regularly. Pay attention to changes in color and
        temperature of your feet. Look for thick or discolored nails (a sign of
        developing fungus), and check for cracks or cuts in the skin.
     *  Wash your feet regularly, especially between the toes, and be sure to
        dry them completely.
     *  Trim toenails straight across, but not too short. Be careful not to cut
        nails in corners or on the sides; it can lead to ingrown toenails.
     *  Make sure that your shoes fit properly. Purchase new shoes later in the
        day when feet tend to be at their largest and replace worn out shoes as
        soon as possible.
     *  Select and wear the right shoe for the activity you are engaged in
        (i.e. running shoes for running).
     *  Alternate shoes -- don't wear the same pair of shoes every day.
     *  Avoid walking barefooted -- your feet will be more prone to injury and
        infection. At the beach or when wearing sandals always use sunblock on
        your feet as on the rest of your body.
     *  Be cautious when using home remedies for foot aliments; self-treatment
        can often turn a minor problem into a major one.
     *  If you are a person with diabetes it is vital that you see a podiatric
        physician at least once a year for a check-up.
 
     For more information on foot health please visit http://www.apma.org or
 call 1-800-FOOTCARE.
 
 SOURCE  American Podiatric Medical Association