The Bond Market Foundation Launches Web Site, Tomorrow's Money; Interactive Site Educates Women and Young Adults About The Importance of Saving and Investing

Apr 27, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Bond Market Foundation

    WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- With only 49
 percent of full-time working women -- and an even lower, 39 percent of young
 adults -- participating in employer-sponsored savings programs, The Bond
 Market Foundation today launched Tomorrow's Money, a Web site that encourages
 individuals to take charge of planning for their economic independence.
     Additionally, according to data compiled by the Pension and Welfare
 Benefits Administration of The U.S. Department of Labor, only 44 percent of
 all private wage and salary workers participate in employer pension plans.
     http://www.TomorrowsMoney.org is an interactive, educational Web site that
 specifically targets women and young adults, providing a step-by-step guide to
 help novices gain the knowledge and confidence they need to begin developing
 their own individual savings and investing programs.
     "We felt that the overall level of knowledge and sophistication among the
 general public about investing was pretty low, that's especially true about
 the importance of asset allocation," said Michael McCarthy, Foundation
 chairman, on why the site was developed.
     The site's goal is to empower people, helping them to develop a sense of
 comfort and confidence so that they can handle their own investments.  In
 order to do this, the site has interactive features which tailors information
 to an individual's situation and offers various lifestyle and investment
 profiles, providing examples of women with various financial goals based on
 their ages and circumstances.  It also focuses on young adults, single or
 married, who are new to saving and investing or may be struggling with debt.
     "Tomorrow's Money is about giving people the tools they need to get
 started," said Heather L. Ruth, president and chief executive officer of The
 Bond Market Association. "We want to persuade people that they are not alone,
 that they can save and make investment decisions, and show them, using the
 interactive features on our site, how to do it."
     The site also helps debunk certain common "excuses" for not investing.  It
 offers strategies for people who believe they don't have enough money to
 invest, believe they are starting to invest too early or too late in their
 lives, do not believe they have enough time to figure out how to invest, or
 who believe they should only be invested in stocks.
     "Knowledge is the best protection to ensure that your financial future is
 secure," said Micah S. Green, Association chief operating officer and
 president-designate.  "Tomorrow's Money Web site will give individuals the
 tools they need to educate themselves on saving and investing."
     Based on users' selections, the site directs them to case studies
 containing useful information tailored to their goals.
     Calculators on the site can be used to help design a budget or savings
 plan to determine college or retirement funding needs, and to allocate
 investments among asset types.
     Extensive market research, including focus groups and expertise provided
 by Association members who serve individual investors, preceded the site's
 development and helped identify its highest-priority target audiences.
     "Young people and women generally have different opportunities to acquire
 the knowledge, skills, motivation and confidence to build a savings and
 investment plan and stick with it," said Kathryn Edmundson, the Foundation's
 executive director.  "But our research tells us that they have two things in
 common:  First, they all feel incredibly pressed for time and therefore need
 to master knowledge in manageable chunks.  Second, most of them feel more
 comfortable obtaining this kind of help from a nonprofit organization before
 going out into the marketplace.  Therefore, being a dot org, rather than a dot
 com, is important."
     "Tomorrow's Money really is a training site for people who are intimidated
 by the thought of investing," added Edmundson, who also served as an advisor
 during the development of the site.  "We're trying to help the people the
 industry will one day serve."
     The site was developed by Bixler Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based firm that
 specializes in creating educational and bilingual Web sites for nonprofit
 organizations.
     The creation of the site fits in with the mission of The Bond Market
 Foundation in seeking to broaden public understanding of and provide quality
 investor education about the bond markets.  The Foundation is the nonprofit,
 charitable partner of The Bond Market Association.
     The Foundation was launched with its new name in 1999 from founding
 contributions by Bear, Stearns & Co., the Dain Rauscher Foundation, Goldman,
 Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and an anonymous industry donor, as well as from the
 Association's Annual Awards Dinners.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X38461559
 
 

SOURCE The Bond Market Foundation
    WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- With only 49
 percent of full-time working women -- and an even lower, 39 percent of young
 adults -- participating in employer-sponsored savings programs, The Bond
 Market Foundation today launched Tomorrow's Money, a Web site that encourages
 individuals to take charge of planning for their economic independence.
     Additionally, according to data compiled by the Pension and Welfare
 Benefits Administration of The U.S. Department of Labor, only 44 percent of
 all private wage and salary workers participate in employer pension plans.
     http://www.TomorrowsMoney.org is an interactive, educational Web site that
 specifically targets women and young adults, providing a step-by-step guide to
 help novices gain the knowledge and confidence they need to begin developing
 their own individual savings and investing programs.
     "We felt that the overall level of knowledge and sophistication among the
 general public about investing was pretty low, that's especially true about
 the importance of asset allocation," said Michael McCarthy, Foundation
 chairman, on why the site was developed.
     The site's goal is to empower people, helping them to develop a sense of
 comfort and confidence so that they can handle their own investments.  In
 order to do this, the site has interactive features which tailors information
 to an individual's situation and offers various lifestyle and investment
 profiles, providing examples of women with various financial goals based on
 their ages and circumstances.  It also focuses on young adults, single or
 married, who are new to saving and investing or may be struggling with debt.
     "Tomorrow's Money is about giving people the tools they need to get
 started," said Heather L. Ruth, president and chief executive officer of The
 Bond Market Association. "We want to persuade people that they are not alone,
 that they can save and make investment decisions, and show them, using the
 interactive features on our site, how to do it."
     The site also helps debunk certain common "excuses" for not investing.  It
 offers strategies for people who believe they don't have enough money to
 invest, believe they are starting to invest too early or too late in their
 lives, do not believe they have enough time to figure out how to invest, or
 who believe they should only be invested in stocks.
     "Knowledge is the best protection to ensure that your financial future is
 secure," said Micah S. Green, Association chief operating officer and
 president-designate.  "Tomorrow's Money Web site will give individuals the
 tools they need to educate themselves on saving and investing."
     Based on users' selections, the site directs them to case studies
 containing useful information tailored to their goals.
     Calculators on the site can be used to help design a budget or savings
 plan to determine college or retirement funding needs, and to allocate
 investments among asset types.
     Extensive market research, including focus groups and expertise provided
 by Association members who serve individual investors, preceded the site's
 development and helped identify its highest-priority target audiences.
     "Young people and women generally have different opportunities to acquire
 the knowledge, skills, motivation and confidence to build a savings and
 investment plan and stick with it," said Kathryn Edmundson, the Foundation's
 executive director.  "But our research tells us that they have two things in
 common:  First, they all feel incredibly pressed for time and therefore need
 to master knowledge in manageable chunks.  Second, most of them feel more
 comfortable obtaining this kind of help from a nonprofit organization before
 going out into the marketplace.  Therefore, being a dot org, rather than a dot
 com, is important."
     "Tomorrow's Money really is a training site for people who are intimidated
 by the thought of investing," added Edmundson, who also served as an advisor
 during the development of the site.  "We're trying to help the people the
 industry will one day serve."
     The site was developed by Bixler Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based firm that
 specializes in creating educational and bilingual Web sites for nonprofit
 organizations.
     The creation of the site fits in with the mission of The Bond Market
 Foundation in seeking to broaden public understanding of and provide quality
 investor education about the bond markets.  The Foundation is the nonprofit,
 charitable partner of The Bond Market Association.
     The Foundation was launched with its new name in 1999 from founding
 contributions by Bear, Stearns & Co., the Dain Rauscher Foundation, Goldman,
 Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and an anonymous industry donor, as well as from the
 Association's Annual Awards Dinners.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X38461559
 
 SOURCE  The Bond Market Foundation

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