The Children's Defense Fund Action Council Releases The 2000 Nonpartisan Congressional Voting Record

All Members of Congress are Urged to Use the Power of Their Votes

To Leave No Child Behind(R)



Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from Children's Defense Fund

    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Which members of Congress voted to
 Leave No Child Behind(R)?  This question is answered by the Children's Defense
 Fund Action Council's Nonpartisan Congressional Voting Record of 2000.  Based
 on 10 crucial votes in the House and Senate that affected the lives of
 millions of children in America, the CDF Action Council found 47 Senators and
 108 House Members failed children and scored below 50 percent; 34 Senators and
 48 House Members consistently stood up and voted to protect children with
 scores of 100 percent. The CDF Action Council also listed the 44 worst
 Senators and 23 worst Members of the House who scored 30 percent or below.
     "We are a wealthy nation," said Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and
 President of both the Children's Defense Fund and the CDF Action Council. "We
 have the resources to make children a priority. In the new millennium, we
 challenge Congress and the President to push partisan politics aside and take
 the necessary steps to Leave No Child Behind(R). Sick, hungry, abused,
 neglected, and illiterate children who cannot vote, lobby, speak, or protect
 themselves need the entire Congress to meet its responsibility to protect and
 treat them justly."
     The best state delegations in Congress are:
 
     1st North Dakota (100%)   5th New York (89.8%)   9th West Virginia (86.7%)
     1st Rhode Island (100%)   6th Connecticut (89.2%)      10th Hawaii (85.0%)
     3rd Vermont (97.5%)       7th Wisconsin (87.2%)        10th Nevada (85.0%)
     4th Massachusetts (93.5%) 8th New Jersey (87.1%)
 
     The worst state delegations are:
 
      48th Idaho (25.0%)          46th Utah (33.3%)        42nd Alabama (39.6%)
      48th New Hampshire (25.0%)  45th Arizona (35.0%)     40th Kentucky(40.0%)
      48th Oklahoma (25.0%)       44th Tennessee (36.4%)   40th  Alaska (40.0%)
      47th Wyoming  (27.5%)       43rd Kansas (38.8%)
 
     The CDF Action Council commends those who scored high and encourages those
 who did not to work harder.
     "We thank those members of Congress with high voting averages for
 children and urge all Senators and Representatives to follow their lead," said
 Edelman. "But our young people need every Senator and every Representative to
 vote for them. During 2001 we will watch what our leaders do and not what they
 say because children are depending on all of us."
     Much of the last session was marked by too many partisan influences in an
 election year.  Funding for discretionary programs was only 4 percent higher
 than needed to keep pace with inflation. However, there were many successes
 for children in the last Congress including the following funding increases:
 
     *     $933 million for Head Start, up from $5.26 billion to $6.2 billion
           in FY 2001, making it possible for nearly one million children to
           participate
     *     An $817 million increase for the Child Care and Development Block
           Grant (CCDBG) from $1.18 billion to $2 billion in FY 2001
     *     $392 million for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers' after-
           school program, up from $453.4 million to $845.6 million in FY 2001
 
     But Congress failed to approve crucial measures including:
 
     *     Child support legislation to help move families out of poverty
     *     Gun safety legislation to protect children against gun violence
     *     Food Stamps and Medicaid coverage for legal immigrant children
     *     Additional funding to extend Medicaid and the State Children's
           Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to the parents of eligible children
     *     The Family Opportunity Act to give higher income families with
           disabled children the opportunity to buy Medicaid coverage
     *     An increase in the minimum wage
 
     Now is the time to Leave No Child Behind(R) and to hold our leaders
 accountable for ensuring every child a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair
 Start, a Safe Start, and successful transition to adulthood.  CDF's top 2001
 priorities are doubling and making refundable the Child Tax Credit to help 16
 million children and lift two million from poverty; to ensure health coverage
 for every child and their parents; to make sure every child is ready to learn
 by strengthening and expanding quality early education, Head Start, and child
 care programs; and to strengthen our over-burdened child welfare system.
 These down payments would really make a difference for millions of children.
     For more information and to see the complete Voting Record, visit the Web
 site at http://www.cdfactioncouncil.org .  For a hard copy of the Voting
 Record contact Gigi Hinton at 202-662-3609 or Libby Alesbury
 202-662-3508.
 
     The CDF Action Council began in 1969 and is a private nonprofit
 organization under Section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code.  The CDF
 Action Council has never taken government funds.
 
 

SOURCE Children's Defense Fund
    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Which members of Congress voted to
 Leave No Child Behind(R)?  This question is answered by the Children's Defense
 Fund Action Council's Nonpartisan Congressional Voting Record of 2000.  Based
 on 10 crucial votes in the House and Senate that affected the lives of
 millions of children in America, the CDF Action Council found 47 Senators and
 108 House Members failed children and scored below 50 percent; 34 Senators and
 48 House Members consistently stood up and voted to protect children with
 scores of 100 percent. The CDF Action Council also listed the 44 worst
 Senators and 23 worst Members of the House who scored 30 percent or below.
     "We are a wealthy nation," said Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and
 President of both the Children's Defense Fund and the CDF Action Council. "We
 have the resources to make children a priority. In the new millennium, we
 challenge Congress and the President to push partisan politics aside and take
 the necessary steps to Leave No Child Behind(R). Sick, hungry, abused,
 neglected, and illiterate children who cannot vote, lobby, speak, or protect
 themselves need the entire Congress to meet its responsibility to protect and
 treat them justly."
     The best state delegations in Congress are:
 
     1st North Dakota (100%)   5th New York (89.8%)   9th West Virginia (86.7%)
     1st Rhode Island (100%)   6th Connecticut (89.2%)      10th Hawaii (85.0%)
     3rd Vermont (97.5%)       7th Wisconsin (87.2%)        10th Nevada (85.0%)
     4th Massachusetts (93.5%) 8th New Jersey (87.1%)
 
     The worst state delegations are:
 
      48th Idaho (25.0%)          46th Utah (33.3%)        42nd Alabama (39.6%)
      48th New Hampshire (25.0%)  45th Arizona (35.0%)     40th Kentucky(40.0%)
      48th Oklahoma (25.0%)       44th Tennessee (36.4%)   40th  Alaska (40.0%)
      47th Wyoming  (27.5%)       43rd Kansas (38.8%)
 
     The CDF Action Council commends those who scored high and encourages those
 who did not to work harder.
     "We thank those members of Congress with high voting averages for
 children and urge all Senators and Representatives to follow their lead," said
 Edelman. "But our young people need every Senator and every Representative to
 vote for them. During 2001 we will watch what our leaders do and not what they
 say because children are depending on all of us."
     Much of the last session was marked by too many partisan influences in an
 election year.  Funding for discretionary programs was only 4 percent higher
 than needed to keep pace with inflation. However, there were many successes
 for children in the last Congress including the following funding increases:
 
     *     $933 million for Head Start, up from $5.26 billion to $6.2 billion
           in FY 2001, making it possible for nearly one million children to
           participate
     *     An $817 million increase for the Child Care and Development Block
           Grant (CCDBG) from $1.18 billion to $2 billion in FY 2001
     *     $392 million for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers' after-
           school program, up from $453.4 million to $845.6 million in FY 2001
 
     But Congress failed to approve crucial measures including:
 
     *     Child support legislation to help move families out of poverty
     *     Gun safety legislation to protect children against gun violence
     *     Food Stamps and Medicaid coverage for legal immigrant children
     *     Additional funding to extend Medicaid and the State Children's
           Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to the parents of eligible children
     *     The Family Opportunity Act to give higher income families with
           disabled children the opportunity to buy Medicaid coverage
     *     An increase in the minimum wage
 
     Now is the time to Leave No Child Behind(R) and to hold our leaders
 accountable for ensuring every child a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair
 Start, a Safe Start, and successful transition to adulthood.  CDF's top 2001
 priorities are doubling and making refundable the Child Tax Credit to help 16
 million children and lift two million from poverty; to ensure health coverage
 for every child and their parents; to make sure every child is ready to learn
 by strengthening and expanding quality early education, Head Start, and child
 care programs; and to strengthen our over-burdened child welfare system.
 These down payments would really make a difference for millions of children.
     For more information and to see the complete Voting Record, visit the Web
 site at http://www.cdfactioncouncil.org .  For a hard copy of the Voting
 Record contact Gigi Hinton at 202-662-3609 or Libby Alesbury
 202-662-3508.
 
     The CDF Action Council began in 1969 and is a private nonprofit
 organization under Section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code.  The CDF
 Action Council has never taken government funds.
 
 SOURCE  Children's Defense Fund