The Conference Board's Help-Wanted Index Declines Five Points

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Conference Board

    NEW YORK, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board's Help-Wanted
 Advertising Index closed at 66 in March, down five points from February. It
 was 88 one year ago.
     The last time the Index was at this low a level was in April 1993.
     In the last three months, help-wanted advertising declined in all nine
 U.S. regions. Steepest declines occurred in the East North Central (-24.7%),
 Mountain (-19.5%), Pacific (-19.5%) and Middle Atlantic (-19.3%) regions.
     Says Conference Board Economist Ken Goldstein: "Demand for labor is
 slowing across the board. Through February, job gains of about 100,000 per
 month were prevailing. That was half the monthly job gain of one year ago.
 While declines are unlikely to continue this spring and early summer, job
 growth has clearly slowed and may struggle to reach 50,000 per month. Help-
 wanted ad volume is about 20 percent lower than three months earlier.
 Meanwhile, initial unemployment claims climbed to as high as 380,000 a week."
     The Conference Board surveys help-wanted advertising volume in 51 major
 newspapers across the country every month. Because ad volume has proven to be
 sensitive to labor market conditions, this measure provides a gauge of change
 in the local, regional and national supply of jobs.
 
     Latest seasonally-adjusted results follow:
 
                                March 01    Feb. 01    Jan. 01    March. 00
     National Index                66         71         76          88
     Proportion of Labor Markets
      With rising Want-ad Volume   12%        24%        35%         41%
     Unemployment Rate            4.3%       4.2%       4.2%        4.0%
 
     THE NEXT RELEASE WILL BE THURSDAY, MAY 31, AT 10:00 AM ET
 
     For further information:  Ken Goldstein, 212-339-0331 (office),
                                              or 908-925-1476 (home)
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X48774196
 
 

SOURCE The Conference Board
    NEW YORK, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The Conference Board's Help-Wanted
 Advertising Index closed at 66 in March, down five points from February. It
 was 88 one year ago.
     The last time the Index was at this low a level was in April 1993.
     In the last three months, help-wanted advertising declined in all nine
 U.S. regions. Steepest declines occurred in the East North Central (-24.7%),
 Mountain (-19.5%), Pacific (-19.5%) and Middle Atlantic (-19.3%) regions.
     Says Conference Board Economist Ken Goldstein: "Demand for labor is
 slowing across the board. Through February, job gains of about 100,000 per
 month were prevailing. That was half the monthly job gain of one year ago.
 While declines are unlikely to continue this spring and early summer, job
 growth has clearly slowed and may struggle to reach 50,000 per month. Help-
 wanted ad volume is about 20 percent lower than three months earlier.
 Meanwhile, initial unemployment claims climbed to as high as 380,000 a week."
     The Conference Board surveys help-wanted advertising volume in 51 major
 newspapers across the country every month. Because ad volume has proven to be
 sensitive to labor market conditions, this measure provides a gauge of change
 in the local, regional and national supply of jobs.
 
     Latest seasonally-adjusted results follow:
 
                                March 01    Feb. 01    Jan. 01    March. 00
     National Index                66         71         76          88
     Proportion of Labor Markets
      With rising Want-ad Volume   12%        24%        35%         41%
     Unemployment Rate            4.3%       4.2%       4.2%        4.0%
 
     THE NEXT RELEASE WILL BE THURSDAY, MAY 31, AT 10:00 AM ET
 
     For further information:  Ken Goldstein, 212-339-0331 (office),
                                              or 908-925-1476 (home)
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X48774196
 
 SOURCE  The Conference Board