The DMA and AARP Team Up to Help Older Americans 'Get Cybersavvy'

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Direct Marketing Association

    NEW YORK, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Already, approximately 55 percent of
 Americans are online, and a growing number of U.S. "netizens" are over the age
 of 50.  In fact, people over 50 are the fastest growing segment of American
 consumers going online, according to the AARP.
     To help older people safely navigate the online terrain, the Direct
 Marketing Association (The DMA) has teamed up with the AARP to create Getting
 Cybersavvy:  A New User's Guide to Going Online.
     "We want to encourage potential users, many of whom are older consumers,
 to explore cyberspace's many benefits in an enjoyable and secure way," said
 Marsha Goldberger, director, ethics and consumer affairs, The DMA.
     "Internet users, especially older Americans, need to know about their
 online rights and what to look for in terms of security and privacy," said
 Jane M. King, manager, consumer protection, AARP.  "Cybersavvy gives them the
 tools they need to be smart online consumers."
 
     Online Basics
     Getting Cybersavvy, available in print or at http://www.cybersavvy.org,
 provides all of the basic information needed to start surfing the Internet,
 including tips on hooking up your computer connection for the first time,
 picking Internet service providers, a glossary of cyber jargon and advice on
 surfing safely.
 
     Smart Surfing
     Getting CyberSavvy also provides detailed information on how to be a smart
 shopper and maintain your privacy while on the Internet.
 
     -- Shop from companies you know.  Shopping from the sites of favorite
        catalogs and retail stores is a good way to get started.  You can find
        out more information about a company by checking with the Better
        Business Bureau (BBB) or consumer protection agencies.  Also, more than
        300 listings of reputable catalog and online retailers are available on
        The DMA's consumer Web site, http://www.shopthenet.org.
 
     -- Use a credit card.  By using a credit card you have the same
        protections under the Fair Credit Billing Act as you do when shopping
        in stores or from catalogs.
 
     -- Look for privacy policies.  You can enjoy significant convenience and
        cost-savings by sharing information with a company about your
        interests.  However, the company should tell you how they use the
        information and, if information is shared with third parties, respect
        your wish not to have it shared.
 
     Additional Web Resources
     Getting Cybersavvy includes links to more than two dozen sites of interest
 to older consumers, including AARP (www.aarp.org) and various government and
 consumer information sites.
     In addition to being accessible at http://www.cybersavvy.org, a free copy
 of the 20-page booklet can be obtained by writing:  The Direct Marketing
 Association, Attn: Getting CyberSavvy, 1111 19th Street NW, Washington DC
 20036, or consumer@the-dma.org.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X50288282
 
 

SOURCE The Direct Marketing Association
    NEW YORK, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Already, approximately 55 percent of
 Americans are online, and a growing number of U.S. "netizens" are over the age
 of 50.  In fact, people over 50 are the fastest growing segment of American
 consumers going online, according to the AARP.
     To help older people safely navigate the online terrain, the Direct
 Marketing Association (The DMA) has teamed up with the AARP to create Getting
 Cybersavvy:  A New User's Guide to Going Online.
     "We want to encourage potential users, many of whom are older consumers,
 to explore cyberspace's many benefits in an enjoyable and secure way," said
 Marsha Goldberger, director, ethics and consumer affairs, The DMA.
     "Internet users, especially older Americans, need to know about their
 online rights and what to look for in terms of security and privacy," said
 Jane M. King, manager, consumer protection, AARP.  "Cybersavvy gives them the
 tools they need to be smart online consumers."
 
     Online Basics
     Getting Cybersavvy, available in print or at http://www.cybersavvy.org,
 provides all of the basic information needed to start surfing the Internet,
 including tips on hooking up your computer connection for the first time,
 picking Internet service providers, a glossary of cyber jargon and advice on
 surfing safely.
 
     Smart Surfing
     Getting CyberSavvy also provides detailed information on how to be a smart
 shopper and maintain your privacy while on the Internet.
 
     -- Shop from companies you know.  Shopping from the sites of favorite
        catalogs and retail stores is a good way to get started.  You can find
        out more information about a company by checking with the Better
        Business Bureau (BBB) or consumer protection agencies.  Also, more than
        300 listings of reputable catalog and online retailers are available on
        The DMA's consumer Web site, http://www.shopthenet.org.
 
     -- Use a credit card.  By using a credit card you have the same
        protections under the Fair Credit Billing Act as you do when shopping
        in stores or from catalogs.
 
     -- Look for privacy policies.  You can enjoy significant convenience and
        cost-savings by sharing information with a company about your
        interests.  However, the company should tell you how they use the
        information and, if information is shared with third parties, respect
        your wish not to have it shared.
 
     Additional Web Resources
     Getting Cybersavvy includes links to more than two dozen sites of interest
 to older consumers, including AARP (www.aarp.org) and various government and
 consumer information sites.
     In addition to being accessible at http://www.cybersavvy.org, a free copy
 of the 20-page booklet can be obtained by writing:  The Direct Marketing
 Association, Attn: Getting CyberSavvy, 1111 19th Street NW, Washington DC
 20036, or consumer@the-dma.org.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X50288282
 
 SOURCE  The Direct Marketing Association