The New Yorker Magazine Will Receive The Overseas Press Club's President's Award

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from Overseas Press Club of America

    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The New Yorker
 magazine will be honored with the President's Award at the Overseas Press
 Club's 62nd Annual Awards dinner tomorrow, OPC President Larry Martz announced
 today.
     "The President's Award is being given in recognition of The New Yorker's
 commitment to distinguished coverage of international stories ranging from
 Janet Flanner's "Letters from Paris" in the 1940s through John Hersey's
 acclaimed piece on "Hiroshima" to its current coverage on conflicts in Africa
 and Kosovo," Martz said.
     The OPC has honored The New Yorker with dozens of awards and citations
 over the years, to such renowned writers as Mark Danner, Joe Kane, Fred
 Shapiro and Lawrence Wechsler. Last year the photojournalist Gilles Peress won
 the OPC's Olivier Rebbot Award for a photo essay in The New Yorker on the
 exodus of refugees from Kosovo.
     David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, will accept the President's Award
 and deliver the keynote speech. Remnick, who covered the Soviet Union for The
 Washington Post in the late 1980s and early 1990s, was named editor of The New
 Yorker in 1998, succeeding Tina Brown.
     Remnick won both the Pulitzer Prize and a George Polk Award in 1994 for
 his critically acclaimed book on the collapse of the Soviet Union, titled
 "Lenin's Tomb," published by Random House in 1993.
     Remnick worked for The Washington Post for 10 years before joining The New
 Yorker.  He began his newspaper career covering sports and styles before being
 sent to Moscow in 1988.  His four-year assignment provided him with a
 front-row seat from which to view the stunning disintegration of the Soviet
 Empire and the collapse of the Soviet Union itself.
     Dan Rather, who just celebrated his 20th anniversary as anchor of CBS
 Evening News, will present 19 OPC awards for outstanding international
 coverage by newspapers, wire services, magazines, books, radio, television,
 photography, cartoons and online journalism.
     In addition, a new award for outstanding coverage by a Russian journalist
 in the Russian media will be granted in the memory of Artyom Borovik, a
 crusading Russian reporter who died in a plane crash at the age of 39 in March
 1999.  Borovik, who reported for both CBS 60 Minutes and U. S. News & World
 Report, in addition to his work for Russian publications and the broadcast
 media, was best known for his fearless and critical reporting on the Soviet
 war in Afghanistan and, later, of the brutal Russian attempt to put down the
 still ongoing revolt in Chechnya.
 
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SOURCE Overseas Press Club of America
    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The New Yorker
 magazine will be honored with the President's Award at the Overseas Press
 Club's 62nd Annual Awards dinner tomorrow, OPC President Larry Martz announced
 today.
     "The President's Award is being given in recognition of The New Yorker's
 commitment to distinguished coverage of international stories ranging from
 Janet Flanner's "Letters from Paris" in the 1940s through John Hersey's
 acclaimed piece on "Hiroshima" to its current coverage on conflicts in Africa
 and Kosovo," Martz said.
     The OPC has honored The New Yorker with dozens of awards and citations
 over the years, to such renowned writers as Mark Danner, Joe Kane, Fred
 Shapiro and Lawrence Wechsler. Last year the photojournalist Gilles Peress won
 the OPC's Olivier Rebbot Award for a photo essay in The New Yorker on the
 exodus of refugees from Kosovo.
     David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, will accept the President's Award
 and deliver the keynote speech. Remnick, who covered the Soviet Union for The
 Washington Post in the late 1980s and early 1990s, was named editor of The New
 Yorker in 1998, succeeding Tina Brown.
     Remnick won both the Pulitzer Prize and a George Polk Award in 1994 for
 his critically acclaimed book on the collapse of the Soviet Union, titled
 "Lenin's Tomb," published by Random House in 1993.
     Remnick worked for The Washington Post for 10 years before joining The New
 Yorker.  He began his newspaper career covering sports and styles before being
 sent to Moscow in 1988.  His four-year assignment provided him with a
 front-row seat from which to view the stunning disintegration of the Soviet
 Empire and the collapse of the Soviet Union itself.
     Dan Rather, who just celebrated his 20th anniversary as anchor of CBS
 Evening News, will present 19 OPC awards for outstanding international
 coverage by newspapers, wire services, magazines, books, radio, television,
 photography, cartoons and online journalism.
     In addition, a new award for outstanding coverage by a Russian journalist
 in the Russian media will be granted in the memory of Artyom Borovik, a
 crusading Russian reporter who died in a plane crash at the age of 39 in March
 1999.  Borovik, who reported for both CBS 60 Minutes and U. S. News & World
 Report, in addition to his work for Russian publications and the broadcast
 media, was best known for his fearless and critical reporting on the Soviet
 war in Afghanistan and, later, of the brutal Russian attempt to put down the
 still ongoing revolt in Chechnya.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X56683901
 
 SOURCE  Overseas Press Club of America