The Weather Channel Employees Screened for Skin Cancer By the American Academy Of Dermatology on Melanoma Monday

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Academy of Dermatology

    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Academy of Dermatology
 (AAD) will partner with The Weather Channel to screen its employees for skin
 cancer at The Weather Channel's corporate headquarters in Atlanta as part of
 the AAD's annual Melanoma Monday.  AAD members will volunteer their time to
 participate in this special screening on Melanoma Monday, May 7.
     Melanoma Monday, now in its seventh year, has been designated "National
 Skin Self-Examination Day" in order to raise awareness about melanoma, the
 deadliest form of skin cancer, and to encourage Americans to begin a lifelong
 habit of regular skin self-examinations.
     Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States with
 more than 1 million new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.  It is
 estimated that 51,400 people in the United States will be diagnosed with
 melanoma -- the most serious form of skin cancer -- in 2001, a 9 percent
 increase from 2000.  In addition, approximately 7,800 deaths will be
 attributed to melanoma in 2001.  At this rate, one person dies of melanoma
 every hour.
     This year, The Weather Channel will launch a national multi-year campaign
 designed to heighten public awareness about the dangers of overexposure to the
 sun.  Since its inception in 1982, The Weather Channel has been committed to
 providing consumers with valuable educational information on weather-related
 issues -- including regular updates on the UV Index and sun safety tips.
     "We applaud The Weather Channel for educating their employees and their
 viewers about the importance of skin cancer detection and prevention," said
 Ronald G. Wheeland, MD, President of the American Academy of Dermatology.  "By
 participating in our national Melanoma Monday skin cancer screening, The
 Weather Channel employees will serve as role models to the public to practice
 regular skin self-exams and sun safe behaviors."
     "The Weather Channel is constantly looking for ways to improve the health
 and safety of our employees and consumers, and we are pleased to partner with
 the American Academy of Dermatology on Melanoma Monday to raise awareness of
 skin cancer detection and prevention," said Decker Anstrom, CEO of The Weather
 Channel.  "Since skin cancer is directly linked to the sun, providing this
 service is a natural fit for The Weather Channel."
     Melanoma Monday also marks the beginning of the 17th annual Melanoma/Skin
 Cancer Detection and Prevention Month.  During May, and throughout the year,
 nearly 2,000 volunteer dermatologists will be offering free screenings for
 early skin cancers, including melanoma.  These screenings will take place at
 local hospitals, work places, health fairs and other designated sites.
 Consumers who want to find a screening in their area can visit the AAD's web
 site at www.aad.org for a list of dermatologists conducting free skin cancer
 screenings.
     Since 1985, volunteer dermatologists have conducted more than 1.2 million
 screenings and have detected more than 116,000 suspicious lesions, including
 approximately 15,150 suspected melanomas.
     The AAD urges everyone to examine their skin regularly.  This means
 looking over your entire body including your back, your scalp, the soles of
 your feet, between your toes, and the palms of your hands.  If there are any
 changes in the size, color, shape or texture of a mole, the development of a
 new mole, or any other unusual changes in the skin, see your dermatologist or
 personal physician immediately.
     In addition, the AAD recommends that everyone practice the Academy's sun
 protection guidelines, including avoiding outdoor activities between 10 a.m.
 and 4 p.m. when the sun's rays are the strongest, seeking shade whenever
 possible, wearing a broad spectrum sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor
 (SPF) of at least 15, and wearing sun-protective clothing.  And, don't forget
 the "Shadow Rule" -- if your shadow is shorter than you are, the damaging rays
 of the sun are at their strongest and you are likely to sunburn.
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to:  advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the
 skin; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research
 in dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a
 lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails.  For more information, contact
 the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X84101167
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Dermatology
    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Academy of Dermatology
 (AAD) will partner with The Weather Channel to screen its employees for skin
 cancer at The Weather Channel's corporate headquarters in Atlanta as part of
 the AAD's annual Melanoma Monday.  AAD members will volunteer their time to
 participate in this special screening on Melanoma Monday, May 7.
     Melanoma Monday, now in its seventh year, has been designated "National
 Skin Self-Examination Day" in order to raise awareness about melanoma, the
 deadliest form of skin cancer, and to encourage Americans to begin a lifelong
 habit of regular skin self-examinations.
     Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States with
 more than 1 million new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.  It is
 estimated that 51,400 people in the United States will be diagnosed with
 melanoma -- the most serious form of skin cancer -- in 2001, a 9 percent
 increase from 2000.  In addition, approximately 7,800 deaths will be
 attributed to melanoma in 2001.  At this rate, one person dies of melanoma
 every hour.
     This year, The Weather Channel will launch a national multi-year campaign
 designed to heighten public awareness about the dangers of overexposure to the
 sun.  Since its inception in 1982, The Weather Channel has been committed to
 providing consumers with valuable educational information on weather-related
 issues -- including regular updates on the UV Index and sun safety tips.
     "We applaud The Weather Channel for educating their employees and their
 viewers about the importance of skin cancer detection and prevention," said
 Ronald G. Wheeland, MD, President of the American Academy of Dermatology.  "By
 participating in our national Melanoma Monday skin cancer screening, The
 Weather Channel employees will serve as role models to the public to practice
 regular skin self-exams and sun safe behaviors."
     "The Weather Channel is constantly looking for ways to improve the health
 and safety of our employees and consumers, and we are pleased to partner with
 the American Academy of Dermatology on Melanoma Monday to raise awareness of
 skin cancer detection and prevention," said Decker Anstrom, CEO of The Weather
 Channel.  "Since skin cancer is directly linked to the sun, providing this
 service is a natural fit for The Weather Channel."
     Melanoma Monday also marks the beginning of the 17th annual Melanoma/Skin
 Cancer Detection and Prevention Month.  During May, and throughout the year,
 nearly 2,000 volunteer dermatologists will be offering free screenings for
 early skin cancers, including melanoma.  These screenings will take place at
 local hospitals, work places, health fairs and other designated sites.
 Consumers who want to find a screening in their area can visit the AAD's web
 site at www.aad.org for a list of dermatologists conducting free skin cancer
 screenings.
     Since 1985, volunteer dermatologists have conducted more than 1.2 million
 screenings and have detected more than 116,000 suspicious lesions, including
 approximately 15,150 suspected melanomas.
     The AAD urges everyone to examine their skin regularly.  This means
 looking over your entire body including your back, your scalp, the soles of
 your feet, between your toes, and the palms of your hands.  If there are any
 changes in the size, color, shape or texture of a mole, the development of a
 new mole, or any other unusual changes in the skin, see your dermatologist or
 personal physician immediately.
     In addition, the AAD recommends that everyone practice the Academy's sun
 protection guidelines, including avoiding outdoor activities between 10 a.m.
 and 4 p.m. when the sun's rays are the strongest, seeking shade whenever
 possible, wearing a broad spectrum sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor
 (SPF) of at least 15, and wearing sun-protective clothing.  And, don't forget
 the "Shadow Rule" -- if your shadow is shorter than you are, the damaging rays
 of the sun are at their strongest and you are likely to sunburn.
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to:  advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the
 skin; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research
 in dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a
 lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails.  For more information, contact
 the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X84101167
 
 SOURCE  American Academy of Dermatology