To Reduce Declining Reading Achievement Among Disadvantaged Students, Expert Advocates Early Intervention Camp Program for Future Life Success

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Milken Family Foundation

    SANTA MONICA, Calif., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Summer literacy day camps
 for disadvantaged children can greatly reduce social inequality in elementary
 school reading achievement for these students, according to a new study by Dr.
 John Schacter, senior research associate at the Milken Family Foundation.
     Schacter advocates these camps based on his own and other research
 findings showing that summer reading in the formative years greatly enhances a
 child's opportunities for future success.  See http://www.mff.org.
     "Disadvantaged kids don't have access to community resources to continue
 their education when school is not in session," says Schacter in his report.
 "They lose academic ground when compared with children in more privileged
 neighborhoods."
     Reading achievement for low income students declines substantially over
 the summer, while that of higher income students remains stable or even
 increases, according to Schacter.  By the time children reach fifth grade, the
 cumulative impact of such gains or losses is significant and increasingly
 difficult to overcome.
     "Creating resources that are fun and also engage kids academically is
 critical if we want to create a world where a child's poverty level does not
 predict his or her future life success," says Schacter, who holds a PhD. from
 UCLA in educational psychology.
     Schacter's study for the Milken Family Foundation, which promotes
 initiatives in education and medical research, took into account recent
 research concluding that only when schools were not in session did children
 residing in better-off neighborhoods make greater achievement gains than those
 living in depressed communities.
     As part of the study, an eight-week summer literacy day camp serving
 disadvantaged first graders in the Baldwin Hills, Calif.-area was established
 by the Milken Family Foundation.  Disadvantaged first grade students made
 significant gains compared to students who did not attend the summer
 intervention.
     "The cost of sending a disadvantaged young reader to eight weeks of summer
 literacy camp was $245 in the test program.  The lost income from high school
 dropouts has been estimated at more than $238 billion," Schacter says.
     For more information or the complete study, go to www.mff.org.
 
 

SOURCE Milken Family Foundation
    SANTA MONICA, Calif., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Summer literacy day camps
 for disadvantaged children can greatly reduce social inequality in elementary
 school reading achievement for these students, according to a new study by Dr.
 John Schacter, senior research associate at the Milken Family Foundation.
     Schacter advocates these camps based on his own and other research
 findings showing that summer reading in the formative years greatly enhances a
 child's opportunities for future success.  See http://www.mff.org.
     "Disadvantaged kids don't have access to community resources to continue
 their education when school is not in session," says Schacter in his report.
 "They lose academic ground when compared with children in more privileged
 neighborhoods."
     Reading achievement for low income students declines substantially over
 the summer, while that of higher income students remains stable or even
 increases, according to Schacter.  By the time children reach fifth grade, the
 cumulative impact of such gains or losses is significant and increasingly
 difficult to overcome.
     "Creating resources that are fun and also engage kids academically is
 critical if we want to create a world where a child's poverty level does not
 predict his or her future life success," says Schacter, who holds a PhD. from
 UCLA in educational psychology.
     Schacter's study for the Milken Family Foundation, which promotes
 initiatives in education and medical research, took into account recent
 research concluding that only when schools were not in session did children
 residing in better-off neighborhoods make greater achievement gains than those
 living in depressed communities.
     As part of the study, an eight-week summer literacy day camp serving
 disadvantaged first graders in the Baldwin Hills, Calif.-area was established
 by the Milken Family Foundation.  Disadvantaged first grade students made
 significant gains compared to students who did not attend the summer
 intervention.
     "The cost of sending a disadvantaged young reader to eight weeks of summer
 literacy camp was $245 in the test program.  The lost income from high school
 dropouts has been estimated at more than $238 billion," Schacter says.
     For more information or the complete study, go to www.mff.org.
 
 SOURCE  Milken Family Foundation