Today's Sports Eyewear - Safe and Cool

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET

    SAN FRANCISCO, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- They're showing up on professional
 ball players of all types.  No, not tattoos -- protective eyewear!
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000323/SFTHFNS1 )
     It's no wonder.  Today's athletes can choose from sports safety glasses
 that look and fit better, have high-contrast tints for better vision
 definition, are lighter and sturdier, and, when worn properly, can prevent
 some 90 percent of sports eye injuries.
     In recognition of April's designation as Sports Eye Safety Month, the
 American Academy of Ophthalmology -- the Eye M.D. Association -- urges all
 athletes to wear appropriate protective eyewear made of polycarbonate plastic
 and fitted by an eye care professional, such as an Eye M.D. (ophthalmologist).
     About 40,000 sports eye injuries occur every year; many result in
 permanent vision loss.  A majority of the victims are children and young
 adults.
     "I've seen kids with injuries ranging from abrasions of the cornea and
 contusions of the lids to internal eye injuries such as retinal detachments
 and internal bleeding.  Unfortunately, some of these kids end up with
 permanent vision loss and blindness," said M. Bowes Hamill, MD, an Eye M.D. at
 the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
     Basketball and baseball aren't the only sports that contribute to the
 thousands of eye injures to children every year.  Football, hockey, soccer,
 tennis and squash are also dangerous to their eyes.  These sports require
 different types of protective eyewear.  Your Eye M.D. can recommend the right
 kind of eyewear for your sport.
     Sports are the leading cause of eye injuries in children, but most
 sporting leagues do not require their young athletes to wear eye protection.
 Yet when they do, the occurrence of eye injuries is greatly reduced.
     Until mandatory eye protection comes to your child's sporting league, it's
 up to you to lobby for and protect your young athlete.  The professionals have
 already gotten the message -- sports eye protection doesn't hinder
 performance, it protects their careers.  And, today, it also looks cool.
     The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world's largest association
 of eye physicians and surgeons -- Eye M.D.s -- with more than 27,000 members.
 For more information about eye health care, visit the Academy's partner Web
 site at www.medem.com.
 
 

SOURCE
    SAN FRANCISCO, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- They're showing up on professional
 ball players of all types.  No, not tattoos -- protective eyewear!
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000323/SFTHFNS1 )
     It's no wonder.  Today's athletes can choose from sports safety glasses
 that look and fit better, have high-contrast tints for better vision
 definition, are lighter and sturdier, and, when worn properly, can prevent
 some 90 percent of sports eye injuries.
     In recognition of April's designation as Sports Eye Safety Month, the
 American Academy of Ophthalmology -- the Eye M.D. Association -- urges all
 athletes to wear appropriate protective eyewear made of polycarbonate plastic
 and fitted by an eye care professional, such as an Eye M.D. (ophthalmologist).
     About 40,000 sports eye injuries occur every year; many result in
 permanent vision loss.  A majority of the victims are children and young
 adults.
     "I've seen kids with injuries ranging from abrasions of the cornea and
 contusions of the lids to internal eye injuries such as retinal detachments
 and internal bleeding.  Unfortunately, some of these kids end up with
 permanent vision loss and blindness," said M. Bowes Hamill, MD, an Eye M.D. at
 the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.
     Basketball and baseball aren't the only sports that contribute to the
 thousands of eye injures to children every year.  Football, hockey, soccer,
 tennis and squash are also dangerous to their eyes.  These sports require
 different types of protective eyewear.  Your Eye M.D. can recommend the right
 kind of eyewear for your sport.
     Sports are the leading cause of eye injuries in children, but most
 sporting leagues do not require their young athletes to wear eye protection.
 Yet when they do, the occurrence of eye injuries is greatly reduced.
     Until mandatory eye protection comes to your child's sporting league, it's
 up to you to lobby for and protect your young athlete.  The professionals have
 already gotten the message -- sports eye protection doesn't hinder
 performance, it protects their careers.  And, today, it also looks cool.
     The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world's largest association
 of eye physicians and surgeons -- Eye M.D.s -- with more than 27,000 members.
 For more information about eye health care, visit the Academy's partner Web
 site at www.medem.com.
 
 SOURCE