Toxics Targeting, Inc.'s Citizens Guide Reveals GE Dumped Over Six Times More PCBs on Land Than In Hudson River

40 PCB-Contaminated Factories, Landfills, Oil Spills and Dredge

Spoil Dumps Identified in Upper Hudson



National Implications for the Superfund Law



Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Toxics Targeting, Inc.

    ALBANY, N.Y., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The General Electric Corporation
 has dumped over six times more PCBs on land in upstate New York than was
 disposed of in the Hudson River -- one of the largest Superfund sites in the
 country -- according to government records contained in a new Citizens Guide
 released by Toxics Targeting, Inc.
     The citizens guide documents how millions of pounds of PCBs and other
 toxic chemicals were improperly disposed of in landfills, sprayed on land and
 roads, spilled near homes and dumped on the Hudson's banks as dredge spoils.
     Toxics Targeting, Inc. today released the Guide, entitled: "General
 Electric's Legacy of PCB-Contaminated Factories, Dumps, Oil Spills and Dredge
 Spoil Sites In The Upper Hudson River Drainage Basin (Citizen's Guide)."  A
 total of 15 sites out of the 40 sites (38%) in the Guide are classified
 "significant threat to public health or environment -- action required" but
 still lack full-scale investigation and clean up.
     Walter Hang, president of Toxics Targeting, said, "The Hudson is only one
 of dozens of PCB-contaminated sites that GE should clean up to protect the
 environment and the public's health.  It is shocking to find out how many
 PCB-polluted sites threaten homes, businesses, drinking water supplies and the
 historic Hudson River."
     The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a draft plan
 which, if finalized in its current form, would require PCB "hotspots" in the
 Hudson to be dredged.  GE would be liable for the cost of dredging, estimated
 at $460 million. GE has spent a reported $60 million on a public relations
 campaign fighting the draft plan.  The deadline for receipt of public comments
 to the EPA is Tuesday, April 17, 2001.  The decision on the Hudson PCB cleanup
 has national implications.
     "The Bush Administration's decision on the Hudson will be a precedent-
 setting policy that will determine whether polluters are ultimately liable for
 cleaning up the vast toxics legacy facing our nation," Hang concluded.  "This
 Citizen's Guide helps concerned citizens participate in that decision."
     Toxics Targeting obtained detailed GE PCB information through Freedom of
 Information requests from the State Department of Environmental Conservation
 (DEC) and the U.S. EPA.  A total of 40 sites are mapped and profiled in the
 Citizen's Guide.
     According to government records, many of those sites have not been fully
 investigated and cleaned up, including:
 
     *  The PCB-contaminated 40-mile stretch of the Hudson River that EPA has
        proposed to dredge;
 
     *  Toxics contaminated GE site and facilities at Ft. Edward, Hudson
        Falls, Waterford, and the GE Main Plant and Riverview Site in
        Schenectady;
 
     *  Toxic contaminated landfills and dumps, including Dewey Loeffel, Glens
        Falls Landfill, Luzerne Site, Malta Test Station, Fort Edward Landfill
        and Kingsbury Landfill.
 
     *  PCB-contaminated dredge spoil dumps, including:  old Moreau, Moreau and
        Site 518.
 
     PCBs are a class of more than 200 synthetic organic chemicals that resist
 degradation and can cause a wide variety of toxic effects.  GE reportedly
 discharged as much as 1.3 million pounds of PCBs into the Hudson River from
 two capacitor plants at Hudson Falls and Fort Edward over the course of 30
 years.  PCBs above 50 parts per million (ppm) in New York are considered
 hazardous waste.
     "There are sites in Upstate New York with levels far exceeding the
 hazardous waste threshold," Mr. Hang noted.  "GE is aware of them, knows they
 pose a serious health threat, and has done little to clean them up or prevent
 the further spread of this toxic substance."
     The Guide especially highlights the problems posed by PCB-contaminated
 dredge spoil sites.  Under a provision of the New York State Constitution, the
 navigational channels of the Hudson must be maintained.  More than 2.0 million
 cubic yards of sediments reportedly tainted with tens of thousands of pounds
 of PCBs have already been removed from the Hudson for that purpose.  Not one
 of these sites has reportedly been fully investigated and cleaned up.  The
 sites include:
 
     *  Old Moreau Dredge: 467,700 cubic yards of material containing 39,300
        pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Lock 4: Approximately 79,700 cubic yards of material containing 4,100
        pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Buoy 204 Annex: Approximately 4,000 cubic yards of material containing
        200 pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Rogers Island: More than 230,000 cubic yards of material containing
        14,000 pounds of PCBs.
 
     *  Moreau Dredge Spoil Site: 100,000 cubic yards of material with an
        average of 1,000 ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Special Area 13: 191,000 cubic yards of material with an average of 75
        ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Site 518: 23,600 cubic yards of material containing 1,600 pounds of
        PCBs;
 
     *  Buoy 212: 77,000 cubic yards of material containing an average of 75 to
        100 ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Lock 1: 48,400 cubic yards of material containing approximately 1,000
        pounds of PCBs.
 
     Toxics Targeting is an environmental database firm based in Ithaca, NY
 that can map and profile up to 17 toxic site categories on or around any
 address in New York.  The firm has compiled extensive information on more than
 400,000 toxic sites across the state and typically provides services to
 environmental consultants, engineers, government agencies, homebuyers and
 attorneys.  A typical Computerized Environmental Report for a single address
 is $150.00.  For more information on Toxics Targeting, visit
 http://www.toxicstargeting.com .
 
 

SOURCE Toxics Targeting, Inc.
    ALBANY, N.Y., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- The General Electric Corporation
 has dumped over six times more PCBs on land in upstate New York than was
 disposed of in the Hudson River -- one of the largest Superfund sites in the
 country -- according to government records contained in a new Citizens Guide
 released by Toxics Targeting, Inc.
     The citizens guide documents how millions of pounds of PCBs and other
 toxic chemicals were improperly disposed of in landfills, sprayed on land and
 roads, spilled near homes and dumped on the Hudson's banks as dredge spoils.
     Toxics Targeting, Inc. today released the Guide, entitled: "General
 Electric's Legacy of PCB-Contaminated Factories, Dumps, Oil Spills and Dredge
 Spoil Sites In The Upper Hudson River Drainage Basin (Citizen's Guide)."  A
 total of 15 sites out of the 40 sites (38%) in the Guide are classified
 "significant threat to public health or environment -- action required" but
 still lack full-scale investigation and clean up.
     Walter Hang, president of Toxics Targeting, said, "The Hudson is only one
 of dozens of PCB-contaminated sites that GE should clean up to protect the
 environment and the public's health.  It is shocking to find out how many
 PCB-polluted sites threaten homes, businesses, drinking water supplies and the
 historic Hudson River."
     The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a draft plan
 which, if finalized in its current form, would require PCB "hotspots" in the
 Hudson to be dredged.  GE would be liable for the cost of dredging, estimated
 at $460 million. GE has spent a reported $60 million on a public relations
 campaign fighting the draft plan.  The deadline for receipt of public comments
 to the EPA is Tuesday, April 17, 2001.  The decision on the Hudson PCB cleanup
 has national implications.
     "The Bush Administration's decision on the Hudson will be a precedent-
 setting policy that will determine whether polluters are ultimately liable for
 cleaning up the vast toxics legacy facing our nation," Hang concluded.  "This
 Citizen's Guide helps concerned citizens participate in that decision."
     Toxics Targeting obtained detailed GE PCB information through Freedom of
 Information requests from the State Department of Environmental Conservation
 (DEC) and the U.S. EPA.  A total of 40 sites are mapped and profiled in the
 Citizen's Guide.
     According to government records, many of those sites have not been fully
 investigated and cleaned up, including:
 
     *  The PCB-contaminated 40-mile stretch of the Hudson River that EPA has
        proposed to dredge;
 
     *  Toxics contaminated GE site and facilities at Ft. Edward, Hudson
        Falls, Waterford, and the GE Main Plant and Riverview Site in
        Schenectady;
 
     *  Toxic contaminated landfills and dumps, including Dewey Loeffel, Glens
        Falls Landfill, Luzerne Site, Malta Test Station, Fort Edward Landfill
        and Kingsbury Landfill.
 
     *  PCB-contaminated dredge spoil dumps, including:  old Moreau, Moreau and
        Site 518.
 
     PCBs are a class of more than 200 synthetic organic chemicals that resist
 degradation and can cause a wide variety of toxic effects.  GE reportedly
 discharged as much as 1.3 million pounds of PCBs into the Hudson River from
 two capacitor plants at Hudson Falls and Fort Edward over the course of 30
 years.  PCBs above 50 parts per million (ppm) in New York are considered
 hazardous waste.
     "There are sites in Upstate New York with levels far exceeding the
 hazardous waste threshold," Mr. Hang noted.  "GE is aware of them, knows they
 pose a serious health threat, and has done little to clean them up or prevent
 the further spread of this toxic substance."
     The Guide especially highlights the problems posed by PCB-contaminated
 dredge spoil sites.  Under a provision of the New York State Constitution, the
 navigational channels of the Hudson must be maintained.  More than 2.0 million
 cubic yards of sediments reportedly tainted with tens of thousands of pounds
 of PCBs have already been removed from the Hudson for that purpose.  Not one
 of these sites has reportedly been fully investigated and cleaned up.  The
 sites include:
 
     *  Old Moreau Dredge: 467,700 cubic yards of material containing 39,300
        pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Lock 4: Approximately 79,700 cubic yards of material containing 4,100
        pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Buoy 204 Annex: Approximately 4,000 cubic yards of material containing
        200 pounds of PCBs;
 
     *  Rogers Island: More than 230,000 cubic yards of material containing
        14,000 pounds of PCBs.
 
     *  Moreau Dredge Spoil Site: 100,000 cubic yards of material with an
        average of 1,000 ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Special Area 13: 191,000 cubic yards of material with an average of 75
        ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Site 518: 23,600 cubic yards of material containing 1,600 pounds of
        PCBs;
 
     *  Buoy 212: 77,000 cubic yards of material containing an average of 75 to
        100 ppm of PCBs;
 
     *  Lock 1: 48,400 cubic yards of material containing approximately 1,000
        pounds of PCBs.
 
     Toxics Targeting is an environmental database firm based in Ithaca, NY
 that can map and profile up to 17 toxic site categories on or around any
 address in New York.  The firm has compiled extensive information on more than
 400,000 toxic sites across the state and typically provides services to
 environmental consultants, engineers, government agencies, homebuyers and
 attorneys.  A typical Computerized Environmental Report for a single address
 is $150.00.  For more information on Toxics Targeting, visit
 http://www.toxicstargeting.com .
 
 SOURCE  Toxics Targeting, Inc.