Traffic Congestion Intensifies in Florida Cities, as Orlando, Fort Lauderdale and Tampa Regions Approach Miami Congestion Levels

This Release Analyses Today's Release of the Texas Transportation

Institute (TTI) 2002 Mobility Study



Jun 20, 2002, 01:00 ET from The Road Information Program

    MIAMI, June 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Acute traffic congestion, once mostly the
 bane of Miami drivers, continues to spread and increase throughout Florida's
 cities and suburbs.
     Four Florida cities continue to rank in the top 25 on the Texas
 Transportation Institute's list of most congested cities in the United States,
 indicating that congestion levels have increased broadly throughhout the
 state.
     Ft. Lauderdale, Orlando and Tampa-St. Petersburg motorists are starting to
 experience similar levels of traffic congestion as their Miami counterparts,
 as vehicle travel across the state continues to increase.
     Miami is the fourth most congested urban region in the U.S., followed by
 Fort Lauderdale at 15th, Orlando at 24th and Tampa-St.Petersburg at 25th.
     Around the state, delays experienced during peak travel time increased
 dramatically between 1990 and 2000, some up to the equivalent of one and a
 half working weeks in additional delays.  In Miami, delays jumped from 45
 hours annually in 1990 to 69 hours annually in 2000.
     The increases in delay per peak road traveler in the 1990s were even more
 significant for some other Florida cities:
 
     *     In Fort Lauderdale, delays more than tripled, from 18 hours
           annually, to 61 hours annually.
     *     In Orlando, delays nearly tripled, from 23 hours annually, to 66
           hours annually.
     *     In Tampa-St. Petersburg, delays increased by half, from 30 hours
           annually, to 45 hours annually.
     *     In Fort Myers, delays more than doubled, from seven hours annually,
           to 16 hours annually.
     *     In Jacksonville, delays increased by half, from 21 hours annually,
           to 32 hours annually.
     *     In West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, delays nearly tripled, from 15 hours
           annually, to 43 hours annually.
 
     The nation's worst 10 urban areas, in order of rank, are:  Los Angeles,
 San Francisco-Oakland, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, Miami-Hialeah, Seattle-
 Everett, Denver, San Jose and New York-Northeastern NJ.  The list places San
 Diego at 16, San Bernardino-Riverside at 20 and Sacramento at 22.
     "This worsening of traffic congestion leads to even more intense wear and
 tear on the road and highway system, and in costs to drivers," said Bob
 Burleson, president of the Florida Transportation Builders Association.  The
 total cost of traffic congestion in Florida was $4.3 billion in lost time and
 fuel in 2000.
     The cost of congestion to the average peak-time driver is $1,255 for Miami
 area motorists.  It is $1,105 for Fort Lauderdale;  $1,225 in Orlando;  $815
 in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area; $835 in the West Palm Beach area;   $615 in
 the Jacksonville area;  $350 in Pensacola and $220 in the Fort Myers area.
     "Florida has been working to provide more adequate funding to better
 manage its escalating traffic congestion," said Burleson.  "But with vehicle
 travel increasing over the last decade by 38 percent in Florida and similar
 increases predicted in the future, it is critical that Florida increase its
 investment in its urban transportation system."
     "Relieving traffic congestion in Florida requires a long-term commitment
 at all levels of government," Burleson said.  "We must ask our representatives
 in Congress to make sure Florida gets its fair share of federal gas tax
 revenue for improvements to our state transportation systems."  Congress is
 now working to reauthorize the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century,
 which expires next year.
     According to The Road Information Program, traffic congestion has a
 detrimental effect not only on individual mobility and work commutes, but also
 on commerce.
 
     (Note: The TTI report this year used an updated methodology, based on
 recent findings on the carrying capacity of highways and streets.  The updated
 methodology has resulted in overall congestion measures being lower than in
 previous reports, making comparisons of data in the 2002 report invalid with
 previous reports.  But data for all years back to 1982 have been recalculated
 in the 2002 edition.  TRIP believes the changes were appropriate and further
 increase the validity of the report.)
 
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                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X31719316
 
 

SOURCE The Road Information Program
    MIAMI, June 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Acute traffic congestion, once mostly the
 bane of Miami drivers, continues to spread and increase throughout Florida's
 cities and suburbs.
     Four Florida cities continue to rank in the top 25 on the Texas
 Transportation Institute's list of most congested cities in the United States,
 indicating that congestion levels have increased broadly throughhout the
 state.
     Ft. Lauderdale, Orlando and Tampa-St. Petersburg motorists are starting to
 experience similar levels of traffic congestion as their Miami counterparts,
 as vehicle travel across the state continues to increase.
     Miami is the fourth most congested urban region in the U.S., followed by
 Fort Lauderdale at 15th, Orlando at 24th and Tampa-St.Petersburg at 25th.
     Around the state, delays experienced during peak travel time increased
 dramatically between 1990 and 2000, some up to the equivalent of one and a
 half working weeks in additional delays.  In Miami, delays jumped from 45
 hours annually in 1990 to 69 hours annually in 2000.
     The increases in delay per peak road traveler in the 1990s were even more
 significant for some other Florida cities:
 
     *     In Fort Lauderdale, delays more than tripled, from 18 hours
           annually, to 61 hours annually.
     *     In Orlando, delays nearly tripled, from 23 hours annually, to 66
           hours annually.
     *     In Tampa-St. Petersburg, delays increased by half, from 30 hours
           annually, to 45 hours annually.
     *     In Fort Myers, delays more than doubled, from seven hours annually,
           to 16 hours annually.
     *     In Jacksonville, delays increased by half, from 21 hours annually,
           to 32 hours annually.
     *     In West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, delays nearly tripled, from 15 hours
           annually, to 43 hours annually.
 
     The nation's worst 10 urban areas, in order of rank, are:  Los Angeles,
 San Francisco-Oakland, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, Miami-Hialeah, Seattle-
 Everett, Denver, San Jose and New York-Northeastern NJ.  The list places San
 Diego at 16, San Bernardino-Riverside at 20 and Sacramento at 22.
     "This worsening of traffic congestion leads to even more intense wear and
 tear on the road and highway system, and in costs to drivers," said Bob
 Burleson, president of the Florida Transportation Builders Association.  The
 total cost of traffic congestion in Florida was $4.3 billion in lost time and
 fuel in 2000.
     The cost of congestion to the average peak-time driver is $1,255 for Miami
 area motorists.  It is $1,105 for Fort Lauderdale;  $1,225 in Orlando;  $815
 in the Tampa-St. Petersburg area; $835 in the West Palm Beach area;   $615 in
 the Jacksonville area;  $350 in Pensacola and $220 in the Fort Myers area.
     "Florida has been working to provide more adequate funding to better
 manage its escalating traffic congestion," said Burleson.  "But with vehicle
 travel increasing over the last decade by 38 percent in Florida and similar
 increases predicted in the future, it is critical that Florida increase its
 investment in its urban transportation system."
     "Relieving traffic congestion in Florida requires a long-term commitment
 at all levels of government," Burleson said.  "We must ask our representatives
 in Congress to make sure Florida gets its fair share of federal gas tax
 revenue for improvements to our state transportation systems."  Congress is
 now working to reauthorize the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century,
 which expires next year.
     According to The Road Information Program, traffic congestion has a
 detrimental effect not only on individual mobility and work commutes, but also
 on commerce.
 
     (Note: The TTI report this year used an updated methodology, based on
 recent findings on the carrying capacity of highways and streets.  The updated
 methodology has resulted in overall congestion measures being lower than in
 previous reports, making comparisons of data in the 2002 report invalid with
 previous reports.  But data for all years back to 1982 have been recalculated
 in the 2002 edition.  TRIP believes the changes were appropriate and further
 increase the validity of the report.)
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X31719316
 
 SOURCE  The Road Information Program