Turn In Spent Lead-Acid Batteries on Earth Day, Says Battery Council International

Apr 19, 2001, 01:00 ET from Battery Council International

    CHICAGO, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- In celebration of Earth Day 2001,
 Battery Council International [BCI] reminds consumers to check their garages,
 boathouses and tool sheds for any spent -- or used -- lead-acid batteries, and
 turn them in for recycling.  According to BCI, which represents the country's
 manufacturers and recyclers of lead-acid batteries, most retail outlets that
 sell new batteries will accept old car, boat, motorcycle, garden tractor and
 other lead-acid batteries for recycling.
     "When you need a battery, you want it to be fresh and fully charged," said
 Ronald M. Pogue, BCI president.  "If you are saving an old battery with a
 little life left in it, you'll be better served by turning it in for recycling
 than by getting stranded when the old battery reaches the end of its useful
 life."
     A new lead-acid battery contains almost 100 percent recycled lead and
 plastic. Four groups have made lead batteries one of the most enduring
 environmental success stories.
 
     *  BCI was instrumental in developing the infrastructure by working with
        legislatures in 37 states to pass laws requiring consumers to turn in a
        spent battery at the purchase of a new one, or pay a deposit.
 
     *  Consumers make the process work by turning in spent batteries.
 
     *  Retailers play a critical role by collecting the spent batteries and
        turning them over to manufacturers delivering new batteries to the
        retailer.
 
     *  Recyclers reclaim the lead, plastic and acid and send it to
        manufacturers, who make new batteries with recycled materials.
 
     "The lead-acid battery industry is the leader in closed-loop recycling
 today and has been using the closed-loop model for 70 years," said Mr. Pogue.
 "Battery Council International developed the model legislation more than 12
 years ago to promote the closed-loop system and to help states insure that
 lead-acid batteries are collected and recycled."
     Besides starting cars and trucks and boats, lead-acid batteries propel
 commercial electric vehicles; back up computer, telephone and emergency
 systems; help public utilities shift electrical loads; provide clean power in
 remote locations; and power weapons and national defense systems.  Lead-acid
 batteries are the product of choice for commercial and recreational electric
 vehicles, including forklifts, airport ground vehicles, mine vehicles and golf
 cars.
     Battery Council International is the not-for-profit organization
 representing lead-acid battery manufacturers and recyclers in the U.S. and
 around the world.  It is the authoritative source of lead-acid battery related
 information.
 
 

SOURCE Battery Council International
    CHICAGO, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- In celebration of Earth Day 2001,
 Battery Council International [BCI] reminds consumers to check their garages,
 boathouses and tool sheds for any spent -- or used -- lead-acid batteries, and
 turn them in for recycling.  According to BCI, which represents the country's
 manufacturers and recyclers of lead-acid batteries, most retail outlets that
 sell new batteries will accept old car, boat, motorcycle, garden tractor and
 other lead-acid batteries for recycling.
     "When you need a battery, you want it to be fresh and fully charged," said
 Ronald M. Pogue, BCI president.  "If you are saving an old battery with a
 little life left in it, you'll be better served by turning it in for recycling
 than by getting stranded when the old battery reaches the end of its useful
 life."
     A new lead-acid battery contains almost 100 percent recycled lead and
 plastic. Four groups have made lead batteries one of the most enduring
 environmental success stories.
 
     *  BCI was instrumental in developing the infrastructure by working with
        legislatures in 37 states to pass laws requiring consumers to turn in a
        spent battery at the purchase of a new one, or pay a deposit.
 
     *  Consumers make the process work by turning in spent batteries.
 
     *  Retailers play a critical role by collecting the spent batteries and
        turning them over to manufacturers delivering new batteries to the
        retailer.
 
     *  Recyclers reclaim the lead, plastic and acid and send it to
        manufacturers, who make new batteries with recycled materials.
 
     "The lead-acid battery industry is the leader in closed-loop recycling
 today and has been using the closed-loop model for 70 years," said Mr. Pogue.
 "Battery Council International developed the model legislation more than 12
 years ago to promote the closed-loop system and to help states insure that
 lead-acid batteries are collected and recycled."
     Besides starting cars and trucks and boats, lead-acid batteries propel
 commercial electric vehicles; back up computer, telephone and emergency
 systems; help public utilities shift electrical loads; provide clean power in
 remote locations; and power weapons and national defense systems.  Lead-acid
 batteries are the product of choice for commercial and recreational electric
 vehicles, including forklifts, airport ground vehicles, mine vehicles and golf
 cars.
     Battery Council International is the not-for-profit organization
 representing lead-acid battery manufacturers and recyclers in the U.S. and
 around the world.  It is the authoritative source of lead-acid battery related
 information.
 
 SOURCE  Battery Council International