UNC Surgeon's Scoliosis Repair Lets Kids Stand Tall

Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from UNC Health Care

    CHAPEL HILL, N.C., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Helen Baddour of Goldsboro,
 N.C., was diagnosed with scoliosis, an abnormality in the curves of the spine,
 when she was 11 years old.  Scoliosis, which is more common in girls than in
 boys, is usually first detected in late childhood or the early teen years.
 While scoliosis can result from cerebral palsy or birth defects, in 80 percent
 of cases the cause is unknown.
     Helen was first fitted with a brace, and when that did not correct the
 problem, she was referred to Dr. Edmund Campion, a pediatric orthopaedic
 surgeon at N.C. Children's Hospital, for spinal fusion surgery.
     "We surgically joined several vertebrae and inserted two parallel rods to
 stabilize the spine," Campion said.  "The rods will never be removed unless
 there are problems, and the likelihood of any serious complications is
 extremely low."
     Less than four weeks after surgery Helen returned to school.  After three
 months she was able to run on a smooth surface, and after eight months she
 will have no limitations on her activities.
     "Helen's curvature improved quickly after the surgery," said Phil Baddour,
 Helen's father.  "Dr. Campion displayed a tremendous amount of confidence,
 which comforted us, and he really took time to answer all of our questions."
 The only treatments for scoliosis that have been proved effective are bracing
 and surgery.
     "Bracing can sometimes slow or stop the curvature," Campion said.  "About
 half of all cases, however, still require surgery."
     Campion stressed that anyone who shows signs of abnormal curvature of the
 spine should be evaluated and closely monitored.  If left untreated, scoliosis
 can lead to severe heart and lung problems as well as physical deformities.
     Since operating on Helen Baddour, Campion has performed his first
 endoscopic surgical repair for scoliosis.  This minimally invasive procedure
 leaves smaller scars, and patients recover even faster.
 
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SOURCE UNC Health Care
    CHAPEL HILL, N.C., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Helen Baddour of Goldsboro,
 N.C., was diagnosed with scoliosis, an abnormality in the curves of the spine,
 when she was 11 years old.  Scoliosis, which is more common in girls than in
 boys, is usually first detected in late childhood or the early teen years.
 While scoliosis can result from cerebral palsy or birth defects, in 80 percent
 of cases the cause is unknown.
     Helen was first fitted with a brace, and when that did not correct the
 problem, she was referred to Dr. Edmund Campion, a pediatric orthopaedic
 surgeon at N.C. Children's Hospital, for spinal fusion surgery.
     "We surgically joined several vertebrae and inserted two parallel rods to
 stabilize the spine," Campion said.  "The rods will never be removed unless
 there are problems, and the likelihood of any serious complications is
 extremely low."
     Less than four weeks after surgery Helen returned to school.  After three
 months she was able to run on a smooth surface, and after eight months she
 will have no limitations on her activities.
     "Helen's curvature improved quickly after the surgery," said Phil Baddour,
 Helen's father.  "Dr. Campion displayed a tremendous amount of confidence,
 which comforted us, and he really took time to answer all of our questions."
 The only treatments for scoliosis that have been proved effective are bracing
 and surgery.
     "Bracing can sometimes slow or stop the curvature," Campion said.  "About
 half of all cases, however, still require surgery."
     Campion stressed that anyone who shows signs of abnormal curvature of the
 spine should be evaluated and closely monitored.  If left untreated, scoliosis
 can lead to severe heart and lung problems as well as physical deformities.
     Since operating on Helen Baddour, Campion has performed his first
 endoscopic surgical repair for scoliosis.  This minimally invasive procedure
 leaves smaller scars, and patients recover even faster.
 
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                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X34386736
 
 SOURCE  UNC Health Care