U.S.-China Relations After Hainan Standoff; Rep. Leach Schedules Wednesday Hearing to Examine Issues

Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from House International Relations Committee

    WASHINGTON, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The
 potential escalation of the U.S.-China surveillance plane incident into a new
 Cold War in Asia dramatically highlighted both the high stakes and inherent
 tensions at issue in U.S.-China relations.  Analysts generally agree that
 America's China policy is the key test of U.S. strategy in Asia and its
 commitment to peace and security in the region.  Over the last decade,
 however, reaching a consensus in the U.S. over the appropriate policies
 necessary to attain that objective has proved elusive.  Contending American
 strategies on China include "constructive" engagement, containment, and
 "conditional" engagement with Beijing.  While the Bush Administration has
 stated that it views China neither as a strategic partner nor an implacable
 foe, the precise contours of its policy toward China have yet to emerge.
 
     WHAT:  Oversight Hearing: After Hainan: Next Steps for US-China Relations
            Subcommittee on East Asia & the Pacific, U.S. Rep. James A. Leach,
            Chairman
 
     WHEN:  10 a.m., Wednesday, April 25, 2001
 
     WHERE: 2172 Rayburn House Office Bldg.
 
     WITNESSES: David Shambaugh, Director of the China Policy Program, George
                Washington University; Nicholas R. Lardy, Interim Director and
                Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, Brookings Institution;
                Joseph Fewsmith, Department of International Relations, Boston
                University
 
     The hearing will review the current state of U.S.-China relations:
 
     * In the U.S. there are bipartisan efforts to accelerate arms sales to
       Taiwan, restrict military-to-military ties with Beijing, increase
       transit visits to the U.S. by senior Taiwanese officials, block China's
       bid to host the 2008 Olympic Games, block Normal Trade Relations (NTR)
       with China, or cancel President Bush's planned visit to China in
       October.
 
     * Security/Non-Proliferation.  Although the Chinese government remains
       cool to concepts of mutual security, it has joined several non-
       proliferation agreements, including the Nuclear Non-proliferation
       Treaty, the Biological Weapons Convention, and the Chemical Weapons
       Convention. How well is China complying with these agreements?
 
     * Human Rights.  The U.S. continues to urge China to release political and
       religious prisoners, grant permission to international human rights
       organizations to make prison visits, allow Chinese to practice their
       religion in a manner consistent with international standards, and
       respect the cultural and religious heritage of Tibet. There are now four
       academics of Chinese origin detained in China, two of them U.S. citizens
       and two of them permanent residents of the United States.
 
     * Trade and Economic Issues.  America has a large trade deficit with China
       (more than $85 billion in 2000), which the U.S. is seeking to address
       through bilateral and multilateral negotiations.  The trade policy goals
       of the U.S. have been to open China's markets to American exports,
       support Chinese domestic economic reform, and integrate China into the
       Pacific and world economies.
 
     CONTACT:  Sam Stratman of the House International Relations Committee,
 202-226-7875.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X81142598
 
 

SOURCE House International Relations Committee
    WASHINGTON, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The
 potential escalation of the U.S.-China surveillance plane incident into a new
 Cold War in Asia dramatically highlighted both the high stakes and inherent
 tensions at issue in U.S.-China relations.  Analysts generally agree that
 America's China policy is the key test of U.S. strategy in Asia and its
 commitment to peace and security in the region.  Over the last decade,
 however, reaching a consensus in the U.S. over the appropriate policies
 necessary to attain that objective has proved elusive.  Contending American
 strategies on China include "constructive" engagement, containment, and
 "conditional" engagement with Beijing.  While the Bush Administration has
 stated that it views China neither as a strategic partner nor an implacable
 foe, the precise contours of its policy toward China have yet to emerge.
 
     WHAT:  Oversight Hearing: After Hainan: Next Steps for US-China Relations
            Subcommittee on East Asia & the Pacific, U.S. Rep. James A. Leach,
            Chairman
 
     WHEN:  10 a.m., Wednesday, April 25, 2001
 
     WHERE: 2172 Rayburn House Office Bldg.
 
     WITNESSES: David Shambaugh, Director of the China Policy Program, George
                Washington University; Nicholas R. Lardy, Interim Director and
                Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, Brookings Institution;
                Joseph Fewsmith, Department of International Relations, Boston
                University
 
     The hearing will review the current state of U.S.-China relations:
 
     * In the U.S. there are bipartisan efforts to accelerate arms sales to
       Taiwan, restrict military-to-military ties with Beijing, increase
       transit visits to the U.S. by senior Taiwanese officials, block China's
       bid to host the 2008 Olympic Games, block Normal Trade Relations (NTR)
       with China, or cancel President Bush's planned visit to China in
       October.
 
     * Security/Non-Proliferation.  Although the Chinese government remains
       cool to concepts of mutual security, it has joined several non-
       proliferation agreements, including the Nuclear Non-proliferation
       Treaty, the Biological Weapons Convention, and the Chemical Weapons
       Convention. How well is China complying with these agreements?
 
     * Human Rights.  The U.S. continues to urge China to release political and
       religious prisoners, grant permission to international human rights
       organizations to make prison visits, allow Chinese to practice their
       religion in a manner consistent with international standards, and
       respect the cultural and religious heritage of Tibet. There are now four
       academics of Chinese origin detained in China, two of them U.S. citizens
       and two of them permanent residents of the United States.
 
     * Trade and Economic Issues.  America has a large trade deficit with China
       (more than $85 billion in 2000), which the U.S. is seeking to address
       through bilateral and multilateral negotiations.  The trade policy goals
       of the U.S. have been to open China's markets to American exports,
       support Chinese domestic economic reform, and integrate China into the
       Pacific and world economies.
 
     CONTACT:  Sam Stratman of the House International Relations Committee,
 202-226-7875.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X81142598
 
 SOURCE  House International Relations Committee