U.S. Conference of Mayors President Palmer Commends Mayor Bloomberg for Leadership on Climate Protection

500 American Mayors Now Pledge to Reduce Carbon Emissions in Cities



May 15, 2007, 01:00 ET from U.S. Conference of Mayors

    NEW YORK, May 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- U.S. Mayors today, met in
 New York to praise Mayor Michael Bloomberg for his leadership and
 commitment to reduce carbon emissions and decrease energy dependency in his
 city. Following the first morning session of the C40 Climate Summit -- a
 gathering of world mayors convened by Mayor Bloomberg and the Clinton
 Foundation to discuss climate change in cities -- U.S. Conference of Mayors
 President, Trenton (NJ) Mayor Douglas H. Palmer jointly led a press
 conference with Mayor Bloomberg in Central Park, to discuss climate
 protection initiatives currently undertaken by American mayors.
     "On behalf of U.S. mayors, we strongly commend Mayor Bloomberg for his
 leadership in committing to make New York City the 'green apple' and for
 his vision to layout a sustainable blueprint that will inspire mayors
 across America," said Trenton Mayor Palmer, President of The United States
 Conference of Mayors.
     Conference President Palmer also used the occasion to announce that 500
 American mayors have signed The U.S. Conference of Mayors' Climate
 Protection Agreement, an agreement where supporting mayors pledge to reduce
 carbon dioxide emissions, in their cities below 1990 levels. Tulsa Mayor
 Kathy Taylor marks the 500th mayor to sign the agreement. This agreement --
 the only climate protection agreement of its kind among U.S. elected
 officials -- was first initiated by leading environmental pioneer, Seattle
 Mayor Greg Nickels in 2005.
     "The demand for action on climate protection is growing every day, in
 big cities and small towns, in the heartland and on the coasts and now
 across the world," said Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. "What started in
 Seattle as a protest against the policies of delay has a coalition of
 communities across America that are making a difference for the future of
 our planet."
     U.S. Mayors also echoed their praise for recent and overdue
 Congressional legislative action seeking to support U.S. local government
 efforts to improve energy efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and
 increase energy independence in cities, counties and states. Legislation
 now before the U.S. Congress is based on the Conference's priority
 recommendation in the Mayors' 10-Point Plan: Strong Cities, Strong Families
 for a Strong America, presented to Congress in January by Conference
 President Mayor Palmer. The House version of the bill, called the Energy
 and Environment Block Grant Act of 2007, is modeled after HUD's successful
 Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) program, expected to be
 introduced this week by Rep. Albert Wynn (MD).
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Conference of Mayors
    NEW YORK, May 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- U.S. Mayors today, met in
 New York to praise Mayor Michael Bloomberg for his leadership and
 commitment to reduce carbon emissions and decrease energy dependency in his
 city. Following the first morning session of the C40 Climate Summit -- a
 gathering of world mayors convened by Mayor Bloomberg and the Clinton
 Foundation to discuss climate change in cities -- U.S. Conference of Mayors
 President, Trenton (NJ) Mayor Douglas H. Palmer jointly led a press
 conference with Mayor Bloomberg in Central Park, to discuss climate
 protection initiatives currently undertaken by American mayors.
     "On behalf of U.S. mayors, we strongly commend Mayor Bloomberg for his
 leadership in committing to make New York City the 'green apple' and for
 his vision to layout a sustainable blueprint that will inspire mayors
 across America," said Trenton Mayor Palmer, President of The United States
 Conference of Mayors.
     Conference President Palmer also used the occasion to announce that 500
 American mayors have signed The U.S. Conference of Mayors' Climate
 Protection Agreement, an agreement where supporting mayors pledge to reduce
 carbon dioxide emissions, in their cities below 1990 levels. Tulsa Mayor
 Kathy Taylor marks the 500th mayor to sign the agreement. This agreement --
 the only climate protection agreement of its kind among U.S. elected
 officials -- was first initiated by leading environmental pioneer, Seattle
 Mayor Greg Nickels in 2005.
     "The demand for action on climate protection is growing every day, in
 big cities and small towns, in the heartland and on the coasts and now
 across the world," said Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. "What started in
 Seattle as a protest against the policies of delay has a coalition of
 communities across America that are making a difference for the future of
 our planet."
     U.S. Mayors also echoed their praise for recent and overdue
 Congressional legislative action seeking to support U.S. local government
 efforts to improve energy efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and
 increase energy independence in cities, counties and states. Legislation
 now before the U.S. Congress is based on the Conference's priority
 recommendation in the Mayors' 10-Point Plan: Strong Cities, Strong Families
 for a Strong America, presented to Congress in January by Conference
 President Mayor Palmer. The House version of the bill, called the Energy
 and Environment Block Grant Act of 2007, is modeled after HUD's successful
 Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) program, expected to be
 introduced this week by Rep. Albert Wynn (MD).
 
 SOURCE U.S. Conference of Mayors