U.S. Navy Commissions Northrop Grumman-Built Aegis Destroyer

Apr 21, 2001, 01:00 ET from Northrop Grumman Corporation

    TAMPA, Fla., April 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Navy today commissioned the
 USS LASSEN (DDG 82), the newest in a series of advanced Aegis guided missile
 destroyers built by Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding, a subsidiary of Northrop
 Grumman Corporation (NYSE:   NOC).
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010421/HSSA014 )
     USS LASSEN is the 32nd ship of 58 ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG 51) Class destroyers
 currently authorized by Congress, and the 14th to be built by Ingalls.
 Following DDG 82, Ingalls has contracts and options to produce 11 additional
 Aegis destroyers, with six of those ships in various stages of production.
     Vice Adm. Edward J. Moore, USN, who delivered the principal address for
 the commissioning, called the Navy's newest surface combatant "a truly awesome
 addition to America's defense capability and a marvel of American industrial
 ingenuity."  He continued, "By putting this powerful and complex vessel to
 sea, the United States Navy and the Ingalls team have accomplished a feat that
 is envied by every other seafaring nation, for this ship is a remarkable
 testament to the shipbuilders art."
     Admiral Moore then placed the new ship in commission for Pacific Fleet
 duty, cheered by some 4,000 guests on hand at Channelside Pier in Tampa.
 "Today is a great and historic day for our Navy and for all Americans," he
 said.  "Today, we have ample reason to be proud.  Today, USS LASSEN is ready
 for sea and ready to protect our nation's vital interests around the world."
     When USS LASSEN leaves Tampa, she will be homeported in San Diego as an
 element of Destroyer Squadron 23.  Cmdr. Sean E. O'Connor, USN, is now in
 command of the 509.5-foot, 9,300-ton destroyer.
     Rear Adm. William W. Cobb Jr., USN, program executive officer, Theater
 Surface Combatants, hailed DDG 82 as "another great example of the wonderful
 ships built in Mississippi at Ingalls."  He added, "The Navy-industry team
 must continue to build these ships to the highest standards of quality and
 technology.  You don't have to worry about this ship or her crew if they must
 go into harm's way.  They'll know what to do."
     "USS LASSEN is the 33rd Aegis ship delivered by our company over the last
 two decades," said Jerry St. Pe', chief operating officer, Northrop Grumman
 Litton Ship Systems.  "Those 33 ships -- 300,000 tons of naval vessels -- were
 completed by our shipbuilders a combined 170 weeks ahead of schedule, more
 than $600 million under budget and to the highest possible quality standards.
 Today, as part of Northrop Grumman, we have a renewed commitment to continue
 our partnership to make future ships of this class every bit as good as USS
 LASSEN, and with the same results in terms of schedule integrity, cost
 performance and quality."
     These highly capable, multimission ships can conduct a variety of
 operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and
 power projection, in support of the national military strategy.  The mission
 of LASSEN is to conduct sustained combat operations at sea, provide primary
 protection for the Navy's aircraft carriers and battle groups, as well as
 essential escort to Navy and U.S. Marine Corps amphibious forces, combat
 logistics ships and convoys.  DDG 82 is capable of fighting air, surface and
 subsurface battles simultaneously, and is equipped with the AN/SPY-1D phased
 array radar, the most powerful air search radar in the Navy's inventory.  The
 ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support
 maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.
     DDG 82 is Ingalls' second Aegis destroyer built under Flight IIA, a major
 upgrade program featuring the addition of aircraft hangars that will
 accommodate two SH-60B helicopters.
     Construction of DDG 82 began at Ingalls on Sept. 8, 1997.  The ship's keel
 was laid on Aug. 24, 1998, and she was launched on Oct. 16, 1999.  DDG 82
 sailed into the Gulf of Mexico for her first sea trials on Nov. 14, 2000.  The
 ship was delivered to the Navy on Feb. 5, 2001.
     In naming DDG 82, the Navy honors Cmdr. Clyde Everett Lassen, USN,
 (1942-1994), a native of Fort Myers, Fla., who earned the Medal of Honor for
 his courageous rescue of two downed aviators while in command of a search and
 rescue helicopter in Vietnam.
     Lieutenant Lassen became the first naval aviator and fifth Navy man to be
 awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery in Vietnam.  His list of decorations
 include the Air Medal (First Strike/Flight Award); Presidential Unit Citation;
 Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Vietnam Service Medal with
 four bronze stars and Vietnam Campaign Medal with Device.
     Ingalls is part of Northrop Grumman Litton Ship Systems (LSS),
 headquartered in Pascagoula, Miss., which includes the Litton Ship Systems
 Full Service Center, also located in Pascagoula, and Litton Avondale
 Industries, New Orleans, La., and Gulfport, Miss.  LSS, which currently
 employs more than 17,000 shipbuilding professionals primarily in Mississippi
 and Louisiana, is one of the nation's leading full service systems companies
 for the design, engineering, construction and life cycle support of major
 surface ships for the Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and international navies, and for
 commercial vessels of all types.  LSS has a firm business backlog exceeding
 $5.2 billion, in a variety of naval and commercial shipbuilding programs.
 
     Northrop Grumman Corporation is a $15 billion, global aerospace and
 defense company with its worldwide headquarters in Los Angeles.  Northrop
 Grumman provides technologically advanced, innovative products, services and
 solutions in defense and commercial electronics, systems integration,
 information technology and non-nuclear shipbuilding and systems.  With
 80,000 employees and operations in 44 states and 25 countries, Northrop
 Grumman serves U.S. and international military, government and commercial
 customers.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X07122197
 
 

SOURCE Northrop Grumman Corporation
    TAMPA, Fla., April 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Navy today commissioned the
 USS LASSEN (DDG 82), the newest in a series of advanced Aegis guided missile
 destroyers built by Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding, a subsidiary of Northrop
 Grumman Corporation (NYSE:   NOC).
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010421/HSSA014 )
     USS LASSEN is the 32nd ship of 58 ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG 51) Class destroyers
 currently authorized by Congress, and the 14th to be built by Ingalls.
 Following DDG 82, Ingalls has contracts and options to produce 11 additional
 Aegis destroyers, with six of those ships in various stages of production.
     Vice Adm. Edward J. Moore, USN, who delivered the principal address for
 the commissioning, called the Navy's newest surface combatant "a truly awesome
 addition to America's defense capability and a marvel of American industrial
 ingenuity."  He continued, "By putting this powerful and complex vessel to
 sea, the United States Navy and the Ingalls team have accomplished a feat that
 is envied by every other seafaring nation, for this ship is a remarkable
 testament to the shipbuilders art."
     Admiral Moore then placed the new ship in commission for Pacific Fleet
 duty, cheered by some 4,000 guests on hand at Channelside Pier in Tampa.
 "Today is a great and historic day for our Navy and for all Americans," he
 said.  "Today, we have ample reason to be proud.  Today, USS LASSEN is ready
 for sea and ready to protect our nation's vital interests around the world."
     When USS LASSEN leaves Tampa, she will be homeported in San Diego as an
 element of Destroyer Squadron 23.  Cmdr. Sean E. O'Connor, USN, is now in
 command of the 509.5-foot, 9,300-ton destroyer.
     Rear Adm. William W. Cobb Jr., USN, program executive officer, Theater
 Surface Combatants, hailed DDG 82 as "another great example of the wonderful
 ships built in Mississippi at Ingalls."  He added, "The Navy-industry team
 must continue to build these ships to the highest standards of quality and
 technology.  You don't have to worry about this ship or her crew if they must
 go into harm's way.  They'll know what to do."
     "USS LASSEN is the 33rd Aegis ship delivered by our company over the last
 two decades," said Jerry St. Pe', chief operating officer, Northrop Grumman
 Litton Ship Systems.  "Those 33 ships -- 300,000 tons of naval vessels -- were
 completed by our shipbuilders a combined 170 weeks ahead of schedule, more
 than $600 million under budget and to the highest possible quality standards.
 Today, as part of Northrop Grumman, we have a renewed commitment to continue
 our partnership to make future ships of this class every bit as good as USS
 LASSEN, and with the same results in terms of schedule integrity, cost
 performance and quality."
     These highly capable, multimission ships can conduct a variety of
 operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and
 power projection, in support of the national military strategy.  The mission
 of LASSEN is to conduct sustained combat operations at sea, provide primary
 protection for the Navy's aircraft carriers and battle groups, as well as
 essential escort to Navy and U.S. Marine Corps amphibious forces, combat
 logistics ships and convoys.  DDG 82 is capable of fighting air, surface and
 subsurface battles simultaneously, and is equipped with the AN/SPY-1D phased
 array radar, the most powerful air search radar in the Navy's inventory.  The
 ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support
 maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.
     DDG 82 is Ingalls' second Aegis destroyer built under Flight IIA, a major
 upgrade program featuring the addition of aircraft hangars that will
 accommodate two SH-60B helicopters.
     Construction of DDG 82 began at Ingalls on Sept. 8, 1997.  The ship's keel
 was laid on Aug. 24, 1998, and she was launched on Oct. 16, 1999.  DDG 82
 sailed into the Gulf of Mexico for her first sea trials on Nov. 14, 2000.  The
 ship was delivered to the Navy on Feb. 5, 2001.
     In naming DDG 82, the Navy honors Cmdr. Clyde Everett Lassen, USN,
 (1942-1994), a native of Fort Myers, Fla., who earned the Medal of Honor for
 his courageous rescue of two downed aviators while in command of a search and
 rescue helicopter in Vietnam.
     Lieutenant Lassen became the first naval aviator and fifth Navy man to be
 awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery in Vietnam.  His list of decorations
 include the Air Medal (First Strike/Flight Award); Presidential Unit Citation;
 Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Vietnam Service Medal with
 four bronze stars and Vietnam Campaign Medal with Device.
     Ingalls is part of Northrop Grumman Litton Ship Systems (LSS),
 headquartered in Pascagoula, Miss., which includes the Litton Ship Systems
 Full Service Center, also located in Pascagoula, and Litton Avondale
 Industries, New Orleans, La., and Gulfport, Miss.  LSS, which currently
 employs more than 17,000 shipbuilding professionals primarily in Mississippi
 and Louisiana, is one of the nation's leading full service systems companies
 for the design, engineering, construction and life cycle support of major
 surface ships for the Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and international navies, and for
 commercial vessels of all types.  LSS has a firm business backlog exceeding
 $5.2 billion, in a variety of naval and commercial shipbuilding programs.
 
     Northrop Grumman Corporation is a $15 billion, global aerospace and
 defense company with its worldwide headquarters in Los Angeles.  Northrop
 Grumman provides technologically advanced, innovative products, services and
 solutions in defense and commercial electronics, systems integration,
 information technology and non-nuclear shipbuilding and systems.  With
 80,000 employees and operations in 44 states and 25 countries, Northrop
 Grumman serves U.S. and international military, government and commercial
 customers.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X07122197
 
 SOURCE  Northrop Grumman Corporation