U.S. Scientist Honored with Japan Prize for Work on Lithium Batteries

University of Texas Researcher Receives $420,000 Grant:

Is 25th American to Win Award



Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from Science and Technology Foundation of Japan

    TOKYO, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- This week, the
 Science and Technology Foundation of Japan will recognize Dr. John B.
 Goodenough with an award of 50 million Yen, approximately $420,000, for the
 discovery of materials critical to the development of rechargeable lithium
 batteries. A professor at the University of Texas, Dr. Goodenough is the 25th
 American to receive the prestigious Japan Prize.
     He will be honored in the prize category of "Science and Technology of
 Environment Conscious Materials." Dr. Goodenough, who is 78, will receive a
 certificate of merit, a commemorative medal, and the cash prize.
     Dr. Goodenough's discovery of lithium cobalt oxide and lithium manganese
 oxide have been critical to the development of lightweight and high-energy
 density rechargeable batteries that power various portable or mobile IT
 instruments.
     The environmentally benign lithium battery is replacing rechargeable
 batteries that use lead and cadmium. The increasing use of lithium batteries
 in hybrid and electric-powered cars should make a significant contribution to
 the environment by reducing the total level of carbon dioxide emissions from
 gasoline powered vehicles.
     More than half of the 45 Japan Prize winners have been U.S. scientists,
 including Dr. Theodore H. Maiman, a 1987 winner credited with the realization
 of the world's first laser; Dr. Robert Gallo recognized in 1988 for his
 contributions to AIDS research; and Dr. Kary Mullis, awarded the Japan Prize
 in 1993, for devising the polymerase chain reaction.
     The Japan Prize, an international award established in 1985 by the Science
 and Technology Foundation of Japan, honors scientists who have made original
 and outstanding achievements that have advanced the frontiers of knowledge and
 served the causes of peace and prosperity.  Five Japan Prize laureates are
 also Nobel Prize winners.
     This year, the Science and Technology Foundation of Japan is also honoring
 Canadian scientist Dr. Timothy R. Parsons for achievements in "Marine
 Biology."  Dr. Parsons, 68, Professor Emeritus at the University of British
 Columbia, earned the Japan Prize for four decades of research that shaped
 Biological / Fisheries Oceanography and for developing a new holistic approach
 to the conservation of fishery resources and protection of the marine
 environment.
 
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SOURCE Science and Technology Foundation of Japan
    TOKYO, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- This week, the
 Science and Technology Foundation of Japan will recognize Dr. John B.
 Goodenough with an award of 50 million Yen, approximately $420,000, for the
 discovery of materials critical to the development of rechargeable lithium
 batteries. A professor at the University of Texas, Dr. Goodenough is the 25th
 American to receive the prestigious Japan Prize.
     He will be honored in the prize category of "Science and Technology of
 Environment Conscious Materials." Dr. Goodenough, who is 78, will receive a
 certificate of merit, a commemorative medal, and the cash prize.
     Dr. Goodenough's discovery of lithium cobalt oxide and lithium manganese
 oxide have been critical to the development of lightweight and high-energy
 density rechargeable batteries that power various portable or mobile IT
 instruments.
     The environmentally benign lithium battery is replacing rechargeable
 batteries that use lead and cadmium. The increasing use of lithium batteries
 in hybrid and electric-powered cars should make a significant contribution to
 the environment by reducing the total level of carbon dioxide emissions from
 gasoline powered vehicles.
     More than half of the 45 Japan Prize winners have been U.S. scientists,
 including Dr. Theodore H. Maiman, a 1987 winner credited with the realization
 of the world's first laser; Dr. Robert Gallo recognized in 1988 for his
 contributions to AIDS research; and Dr. Kary Mullis, awarded the Japan Prize
 in 1993, for devising the polymerase chain reaction.
     The Japan Prize, an international award established in 1985 by the Science
 and Technology Foundation of Japan, honors scientists who have made original
 and outstanding achievements that have advanced the frontiers of knowledge and
 served the causes of peace and prosperity.  Five Japan Prize laureates are
 also Nobel Prize winners.
     This year, the Science and Technology Foundation of Japan is also honoring
 Canadian scientist Dr. Timothy R. Parsons for achievements in "Marine
 Biology."  Dr. Parsons, 68, Professor Emeritus at the University of British
 Columbia, earned the Japan Prize for four decades of research that shaped
 Biological / Fisheries Oceanography and for developing a new holistic approach
 to the conservation of fishery resources and protection of the marine
 environment.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X42666876
 
 SOURCE  Science and Technology Foundation of Japan