USA TODAY Takes the Most In-Depth Look Yet at What Happened Inside The World Trade Center on 9-11

Dec 19, 2001, 00:00 ET from USA TODAY

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- USA TODAY in today's editions takes
 the most in-depth look yet at what happened inside the World Trade Center in
 the 1 hour and 42 minutes between the first terrorist attack and the last
 collapse.
 
     Key findings:
      *  The evacuation was an enormous success. More than 99% of people below
         the plane crashes lived.  Above, the only survivors were four men who
         made a remarkable escape from the south tower.
 
      *  The line of death was so clear that in the north tower, everyone on
         Floor 92 and above died.  Everyone below lived.
 
      *  In the south tower, there was one stairway unobstructed from top to
         bottom.  Four people used this stairway to go down and live; dozens of
         others -- perhaps a few hundred -- used it to go up in search of a
         helicopter rescue that never came.
 
      *  A total of 83 elevator mechanics fled the building, leaving dozens of
         people trapped inside elevators -- a sharp contrast to the heroics of
         the elevator mechanics following the 1993 bombing.
 
      *  Only 2,850 died in the attack.  September 11 was not the bloodiest day
         in US history, despite earlier claims.
 
      *  The buildings were half-empty -- only 5,000 to 7,000 people were in
         each tower, rather than the 10,000 to 25,000 claimed in other
         accounts.
 
     USA TODAY spent two months on a fact-finding mission to determine
 precisely what happened in the 1 hour, 42 minutes and 5 seconds from the first
 jet crash to the second tower collapse.  The newspaper identified where 95% of
 the victims worked or were located at the time of the attacks.  In addition,
 the newspaper matched floor plans, architectural drawings and photographs to
 the accounts of survivors and victims.
     For more information see Wednesday, December 19, editions of USA TODAY or
 logon to USATODAY.com.  For interviews with USA TODAY reporters and editors,
 please contact Nicola Faustino at 703-854-5887.
     USA TODAY is the nation's top-selling newspaper. It is published via
 satellite at 36 locations in the USA and at five sites abroad. With a total
 average daily circulation of 2.3 million, USA TODAY is available worldwide.
 The newspaper is published by Gannett Co. Inc. (NYSE:   GCI)
     USATODAY.com is an award-winning news and information Web site.  More than
 25 million monthly visitors experience comprehensive, convenient USA TODAY
 news and information through interactive features, information graphics and
 multimedia functions including audio, video and live Webcasts.  USATODAY.com
 has more than 200,000 pages of breaking stories in News, Money, Sports, Life,
 Technology and Weather -- updated 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  For more
 information, please visit http://www.usatoday.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X81871696
 
 

SOURCE USA TODAY
    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- USA TODAY in today's editions takes
 the most in-depth look yet at what happened inside the World Trade Center in
 the 1 hour and 42 minutes between the first terrorist attack and the last
 collapse.
 
     Key findings:
      *  The evacuation was an enormous success. More than 99% of people below
         the plane crashes lived.  Above, the only survivors were four men who
         made a remarkable escape from the south tower.
 
      *  The line of death was so clear that in the north tower, everyone on
         Floor 92 and above died.  Everyone below lived.
 
      *  In the south tower, there was one stairway unobstructed from top to
         bottom.  Four people used this stairway to go down and live; dozens of
         others -- perhaps a few hundred -- used it to go up in search of a
         helicopter rescue that never came.
 
      *  A total of 83 elevator mechanics fled the building, leaving dozens of
         people trapped inside elevators -- a sharp contrast to the heroics of
         the elevator mechanics following the 1993 bombing.
 
      *  Only 2,850 died in the attack.  September 11 was not the bloodiest day
         in US history, despite earlier claims.
 
      *  The buildings were half-empty -- only 5,000 to 7,000 people were in
         each tower, rather than the 10,000 to 25,000 claimed in other
         accounts.
 
     USA TODAY spent two months on a fact-finding mission to determine
 precisely what happened in the 1 hour, 42 minutes and 5 seconds from the first
 jet crash to the second tower collapse.  The newspaper identified where 95% of
 the victims worked or were located at the time of the attacks.  In addition,
 the newspaper matched floor plans, architectural drawings and photographs to
 the accounts of survivors and victims.
     For more information see Wednesday, December 19, editions of USA TODAY or
 logon to USATODAY.com.  For interviews with USA TODAY reporters and editors,
 please contact Nicola Faustino at 703-854-5887.
     USA TODAY is the nation's top-selling newspaper. It is published via
 satellite at 36 locations in the USA and at five sites abroad. With a total
 average daily circulation of 2.3 million, USA TODAY is available worldwide.
 The newspaper is published by Gannett Co. Inc. (NYSE:   GCI)
     USATODAY.com is an award-winning news and information Web site.  More than
 25 million monthly visitors experience comprehensive, convenient USA TODAY
 news and information through interactive features, information graphics and
 multimedia functions including audio, video and live Webcasts.  USATODAY.com
 has more than 200,000 pages of breaking stories in News, Money, Sports, Life,
 Technology and Weather -- updated 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  For more
 information, please visit http://www.usatoday.com .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X81871696
 
 SOURCE  USA TODAY