Vitamin C Fights Off Heart Disease, Other Illnesses; Smoking by Parents Reduces Vitamin C in Children

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from Foods for the Future

    WASHINGTON, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Vitamin C can reduce the risk of
 heart disease and other illnesses, a new British study shows, while another
 study has found that children exposed to passive smoking in the home have
 lower levels of Vitamin C in their bloodstream.
     In the study on Vitamin C as combating diseases, scientists at the
 University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine determined that the risk
 of death in healthy adults was reduced by half among those who had higher
 levels of Vitamin C in their blood, compared to those who had lower levels.
     Reporting in The Lancet, the British medical publication, the Cambridge
 researchers said Vitamin C acts as an antioxidant and removes free radicals
 from the body. "The relation with mortality was continuous through the whole
 distribution of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) concentrations," the scientists
 said.
     In the study on children and passive smoking, Dr. Richard Strauss of the
 University of Medicine of New Jersey in New Brunswick, N.J., said that high
 levels of free radicals in tobacco smoke are believed to be responsible for
 decreased levels of Vitamin C not only in smokers, but in children who are
 subjected to smoking in their homes.
     Approximately 22 percent of children and teen-agers are exposed to passive
 smoke at home, USA Today reported.
     The New Jersey research studied almost 3,000 children and teenagers
 ranging in age from four to 18.  The scientists asked parents about their
 smoking habits, their children's diet, and supplemental vitamin use.
     The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found no difference in the
 Vitamin C intake between children who were exposed to passive smoke and those
 who lived in homes with non-smoking parents.  Smokers' children averaged 20
 percent less Vitamin C, and the more parents smoked, the lower the levels of
 Vitamin C were in their children's bloodstreams.
 
 

SOURCE Foods for the Future
    WASHINGTON, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Vitamin C can reduce the risk of
 heart disease and other illnesses, a new British study shows, while another
 study has found that children exposed to passive smoking in the home have
 lower levels of Vitamin C in their bloodstream.
     In the study on Vitamin C as combating diseases, scientists at the
 University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine determined that the risk
 of death in healthy adults was reduced by half among those who had higher
 levels of Vitamin C in their blood, compared to those who had lower levels.
     Reporting in The Lancet, the British medical publication, the Cambridge
 researchers said Vitamin C acts as an antioxidant and removes free radicals
 from the body. "The relation with mortality was continuous through the whole
 distribution of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) concentrations," the scientists
 said.
     In the study on children and passive smoking, Dr. Richard Strauss of the
 University of Medicine of New Jersey in New Brunswick, N.J., said that high
 levels of free radicals in tobacco smoke are believed to be responsible for
 decreased levels of Vitamin C not only in smokers, but in children who are
 subjected to smoking in their homes.
     Approximately 22 percent of children and teen-agers are exposed to passive
 smoke at home, USA Today reported.
     The New Jersey research studied almost 3,000 children and teenagers
 ranging in age from four to 18.  The scientists asked parents about their
 smoking habits, their children's diet, and supplemental vitamin use.
     The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found no difference in the
 Vitamin C intake between children who were exposed to passive smoke and those
 who lived in homes with non-smoking parents.  Smokers' children averaged 20
 percent less Vitamin C, and the more parents smoked, the lower the levels of
 Vitamin C were in their children's bloodstreams.
 
 SOURCE  Foods for the Future