Washington State Nurses Association Supports Registered Nurses' Vote to Strike And Urge the Legislature to Take Action

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from Washington State Nurses Association

    SEATTLE, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Washington State Nurses Association
 (WSNA) strongly supports the registered nurses employed by the Washington
 State Department of Health and Department of Social and Health Services,
 including those at Eastern and Western State Hospitals, as they have voted
 overwhelmingly to authorize a strike.
     Washington state, along with the rest of the nation and the world, is
 facing a nursing shortage crisis. The average age of nurses today is 45. Fewer
 than 9% of the nation's 2.6 million registered nurses are under the age of 30.
 It is critical that the wages and benefits for registered nurses be
 competitive in order to recruit and retain qualified nurses in our health care
 facilities and profession.
     "WSNA has been fighting for quality patient care and a safer workplace for
 our nurses. Mandatory overtime, nursing input, and wages and benefits have all
 been priorities for our local bargaining units. We strongly support those
 nurses who have voted to strike so that their voices are heard," said
 Janice E. Bussert, BSN, RN, President of WSNA. "In order to deliver the
 quality patient care our communities deserve, I implore our legislators in
 Olympia to do what it takes to recruit and retain qualified registered nurses
 for our state facilities."
     Barbara E. Frye, RN, Director of WSNA Labor Relations, is encouraging all
 WSNA members to show their support, "It is imperative for all nurses to stand
 together at this critical time. WSNA will firmly support the efforts of those
 nurses going on strike."
     Founded in 1908, WSNA is a constituent of the American Nurses Association
 and is recognized by the National Labor Relations Board as a collective
 bargaining agent. WSNA represents and promotes the professional development of
 more than 12,000 nurses in Washington state and their economic and general
 welfare by projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by
 informing the Legislature and regulatory agencies of health care issues
 affecting registered nurses and the citizens of Washington state.
 
 

SOURCE Washington State Nurses Association
    SEATTLE, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Washington State Nurses Association
 (WSNA) strongly supports the registered nurses employed by the Washington
 State Department of Health and Department of Social and Health Services,
 including those at Eastern and Western State Hospitals, as they have voted
 overwhelmingly to authorize a strike.
     Washington state, along with the rest of the nation and the world, is
 facing a nursing shortage crisis. The average age of nurses today is 45. Fewer
 than 9% of the nation's 2.6 million registered nurses are under the age of 30.
 It is critical that the wages and benefits for registered nurses be
 competitive in order to recruit and retain qualified nurses in our health care
 facilities and profession.
     "WSNA has been fighting for quality patient care and a safer workplace for
 our nurses. Mandatory overtime, nursing input, and wages and benefits have all
 been priorities for our local bargaining units. We strongly support those
 nurses who have voted to strike so that their voices are heard," said
 Janice E. Bussert, BSN, RN, President of WSNA. "In order to deliver the
 quality patient care our communities deserve, I implore our legislators in
 Olympia to do what it takes to recruit and retain qualified registered nurses
 for our state facilities."
     Barbara E. Frye, RN, Director of WSNA Labor Relations, is encouraging all
 WSNA members to show their support, "It is imperative for all nurses to stand
 together at this critical time. WSNA will firmly support the efforts of those
 nurses going on strike."
     Founded in 1908, WSNA is a constituent of the American Nurses Association
 and is recognized by the National Labor Relations Board as a collective
 bargaining agent. WSNA represents and promotes the professional development of
 more than 12,000 nurses in Washington state and their economic and general
 welfare by projecting a positive and realistic view of nursing, and by
 informing the Legislature and regulatory agencies of health care issues
 affecting registered nurses and the citizens of Washington state.
 
 SOURCE  Washington State Nurses Association