Whole Foods Are Effective Sources of Vitamin E, Research Shows

Almonds Can Help Fill the Gap Between Current and Recommended

Vitamin E Consumption



Apr 02, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Almond Board of California

    ORLANDO, Fla., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- New findings, presented today at
 one of the country's largest scientific meetings, demonstrate the
 effectiveness of whole foods as an important source of vitamin E that the body
 can actually use.  Released at the 2001 Experimental Biology conference, the
 study examined almonds as one of the leading natural sources of vitamin E, and
 found that increased almond consumption is associated with increased levels of
 vitamin E in the blood.  Vitamin E must be absorbed into the blood to
 circulate through the body to allow the vitamin to fulfill its antioxidant
 role in the body.
     "Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that promotes cardiovascular
 health, among other benefits," said Dr. Ella Haddad of Loma Linda University,
 who presented the findings of her study, Effects of Almonds on Antioxidant
 Status and Platelet Activity.  "Our study demonstrates the efficacy of almonds
 and is an exciting development in our understanding of the important role that
 foods play in our body's daily needs."
     The new almond research joins other studies that show the body gets more
 vitamin E from natural sources than from synthetic sources.  As cited by the
 National Academy of Sciences (NAS), other research shows that the synthetic
 form of vitamin E, found in supplements, is only half as potent as vitamin E
 in its natural form. According to the NAS, the Recommended Dietary Allowance
 (RDA) for vitamin E emphasizes natural sources, and establishes 15 milligrams
 daily as the standard, specifying the alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E
 because it is the only form of the eight forms of vitamin E that the body can
 use.
     The new findings on almonds are great news for the 75 percent of all
 Americans who currently do not meet the RDA for vitamin E.  Ninety-six percent
 of the vitamin E in almonds is the alpha-tocopherol form.  In total, almonds
 contain more than 7 grams of alpha-tocopherol per ounce, making them one of
 the leading sources among all nuts and other whole foods.  Survey data from
 the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that the average adult American needs
 an additional 5 to 8 milligrams daily to meet the RDA.
     "This latest research shows that to close the gap between the amount of
 vitamin E recommended and what most of us consume, the emphasis should be on
 nutrient-packed foods we enjoy," said Elizabeth Ward, a registered dietitian
 from Boston.  "Take almonds, for example.  One ounce, or a handful, of almonds
 can help people get what's recommended per day.  And in addition to providing
 all that vitamin E, they also supply protein, fiber, magnesium, potassium,
 calcium and other important nutrients - and the fat in almonds is primarily
 monounsaturated."
     Ward continued, "The key to any healthy diet is to make your calories
 count.  Choose foods that offer important nutrients, substitute
 monounsaturated fat for saturated fat, and include foods you enjoy."
     To help translate this growing body of scientific research into day-to-day
 lifestyle needs, a new Web site, GetYourE.org, has been launched.  The site
 explains vitamin E's role in the body and provides tips and tools to help meet
 the RDA with natural sources of vitamin E.
 
     GetYourE.org features:
     -- An E-quiz to determine how much vitamin E you currently consume
     -- A calculator to help convert different measurements of vitamin E on
        food labels
     -- The opportunity to e-mail a Registered Dietitian questions and receive
        a personalized response
     -- Meal tips and helpful suggestions for getting more vitamin E from whole
        food sources
 
     To obtain a copy of an abstract for Dr. Haddad's study, please contact
 Stephenie Fu at (202) 973-5883.  To learn more about vitamin E and find tips
 on consuming more natural sources of vitamin E, visit www.GetYourE.org for
 consumers and health professionals.
     The Almond Board of California administers a grower-enacted Federal
 Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of
 Agriculture.  Established in 1950, the Board's charge is to promote the best
 quality almonds, California's largest tree nut crop.  For information on the
 Almond Board of California, visit www.AlmondsAreIn.com.
 
 

SOURCE The Almond Board of California
    ORLANDO, Fla., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- New findings, presented today at
 one of the country's largest scientific meetings, demonstrate the
 effectiveness of whole foods as an important source of vitamin E that the body
 can actually use.  Released at the 2001 Experimental Biology conference, the
 study examined almonds as one of the leading natural sources of vitamin E, and
 found that increased almond consumption is associated with increased levels of
 vitamin E in the blood.  Vitamin E must be absorbed into the blood to
 circulate through the body to allow the vitamin to fulfill its antioxidant
 role in the body.
     "Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that promotes cardiovascular
 health, among other benefits," said Dr. Ella Haddad of Loma Linda University,
 who presented the findings of her study, Effects of Almonds on Antioxidant
 Status and Platelet Activity.  "Our study demonstrates the efficacy of almonds
 and is an exciting development in our understanding of the important role that
 foods play in our body's daily needs."
     The new almond research joins other studies that show the body gets more
 vitamin E from natural sources than from synthetic sources.  As cited by the
 National Academy of Sciences (NAS), other research shows that the synthetic
 form of vitamin E, found in supplements, is only half as potent as vitamin E
 in its natural form. According to the NAS, the Recommended Dietary Allowance
 (RDA) for vitamin E emphasizes natural sources, and establishes 15 milligrams
 daily as the standard, specifying the alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E
 because it is the only form of the eight forms of vitamin E that the body can
 use.
     The new findings on almonds are great news for the 75 percent of all
 Americans who currently do not meet the RDA for vitamin E.  Ninety-six percent
 of the vitamin E in almonds is the alpha-tocopherol form.  In total, almonds
 contain more than 7 grams of alpha-tocopherol per ounce, making them one of
 the leading sources among all nuts and other whole foods.  Survey data from
 the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that the average adult American needs
 an additional 5 to 8 milligrams daily to meet the RDA.
     "This latest research shows that to close the gap between the amount of
 vitamin E recommended and what most of us consume, the emphasis should be on
 nutrient-packed foods we enjoy," said Elizabeth Ward, a registered dietitian
 from Boston.  "Take almonds, for example.  One ounce, or a handful, of almonds
 can help people get what's recommended per day.  And in addition to providing
 all that vitamin E, they also supply protein, fiber, magnesium, potassium,
 calcium and other important nutrients - and the fat in almonds is primarily
 monounsaturated."
     Ward continued, "The key to any healthy diet is to make your calories
 count.  Choose foods that offer important nutrients, substitute
 monounsaturated fat for saturated fat, and include foods you enjoy."
     To help translate this growing body of scientific research into day-to-day
 lifestyle needs, a new Web site, GetYourE.org, has been launched.  The site
 explains vitamin E's role in the body and provides tips and tools to help meet
 the RDA with natural sources of vitamin E.
 
     GetYourE.org features:
     -- An E-quiz to determine how much vitamin E you currently consume
     -- A calculator to help convert different measurements of vitamin E on
        food labels
     -- The opportunity to e-mail a Registered Dietitian questions and receive
        a personalized response
     -- Meal tips and helpful suggestions for getting more vitamin E from whole
        food sources
 
     To obtain a copy of an abstract for Dr. Haddad's study, please contact
 Stephenie Fu at (202) 973-5883.  To learn more about vitamin E and find tips
 on consuming more natural sources of vitamin E, visit www.GetYourE.org for
 consumers and health professionals.
     The Almond Board of California administers a grower-enacted Federal
 Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of
 Agriculture.  Established in 1950, the Board's charge is to promote the best
 quality almonds, California's largest tree nut crop.  For information on the
 Almond Board of California, visit www.AlmondsAreIn.com.
 
 SOURCE  The Almond Board of California