Wingspan Records Distributes New Prince Single

Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from Wingspan Records

    DANVILLE, Va., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Prince continues his crusade
 against the oppressive system under which major labels abuse their artists
 while, simultaneously, a small independent hip-hop label out of Virginia has
 taken Prince's challenge "to do the work" literally.  On April 10, 2001 they
 released "U Make My Sun Shine" by Prince with Angie Stone to retail and radio.
     The single is one of the newest attempts by Prince to show that
 distribution of music does not have to be filtered through the major label
 system that leaves many platinum and gold artists bankrupt.
     Both a revolutionary and a visionary, Prince recently started
 http://www.npgmusicclub.com, a source for his fans to download original Prince
 music directly from the source, the artist.  Prince uses fams in place of fans
 to symbolize that his supporters are his family.  Although ostracized by an
 industry that once adored him, his legion of fams is still quite strong.  Over
 the last week, they have flocked to download a new, Napster-only song, "The
 Work -- Part 1" and have instantly made it one of the most downloaded songs in
 Napster history.
     Wingspan Records is the ideal company to be marketing and distributing the
 Prince music through retail stores.  Despite being the most successful
 independent hip-hop label of the last two years, with five consecutive top
 20 Billboard Rap Singles, it has steadfastly remained independent of major
 label involvement in the distribution of its music.
     "We've developed a network of distributors who support us and the music
 that we make," stated Stacey Rogers, national director of promotion. "We're to
 the point where national retail chains respect our product."  With the Prince
 and Angie Stone duet taking off at major metropolitan stations across the
 country, the trend continues.
     Wingspan has its own battles to fight with the establishment's abuse of
 artists.  After releasing the hip-hop version of "Who Let the Dogs Out?" by
 Chuck Smooth in 1998, and developing a publishing partnership with Ozzie
 Gurley, the composer of the music for The Baha Men's version of "Who Let the
 Dogs Out," Wingspan has been in a constant battle with Deston Songs over
 ownership to the publishing of the song.  Deston is a music publishing company
 co-owned by successful songwriter Desmond Child.  Deston contends that its
 agreement with Anslem Douglas, the writer of the words to the song, gives them
 100 percent ownership of the publishing, despite the assertion that Ozzie
 Gurley received no compensation from Deston for his share of the composition
 after being the sole writer of the music.  The dispute is currently in the
 Canadian and New York State court systems.
     Wingspan is owned by Scott Brooks and Charles Fulp, who also own the
 30-store chain of One-Stop Cellular wireless communication stores.  Both in
 their early 30s, these entrepreneurs have created an impressive track record
 of proven, on-going success.
     "We're confident that the rights of the artist will win out in the end
 over the tyranny of big business," stated Scott Brooks.  "It's present in our
 dispute with Deston, but even more obvious in how the music industry has
 disrespected Prince."
     "We're excited about the opportunity to support Prince and help get this
 song out.  Prince made a great song and people deserve to have the chance to
 enjoy it," stated Charles Fulp.
 
     CONTACT:  Stacey Rogers of Wingspan Records 804-797-2155, or
               slice@wingspanrecords.com
 
     This release was issued through DigitalWork.com -- Your Business Workshop.
 For more information visit: http://www.digitalwork.com.
 
 

SOURCE Wingspan Records
    DANVILLE, Va., April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Prince continues his crusade
 against the oppressive system under which major labels abuse their artists
 while, simultaneously, a small independent hip-hop label out of Virginia has
 taken Prince's challenge "to do the work" literally.  On April 10, 2001 they
 released "U Make My Sun Shine" by Prince with Angie Stone to retail and radio.
     The single is one of the newest attempts by Prince to show that
 distribution of music does not have to be filtered through the major label
 system that leaves many platinum and gold artists bankrupt.
     Both a revolutionary and a visionary, Prince recently started
 http://www.npgmusicclub.com, a source for his fans to download original Prince
 music directly from the source, the artist.  Prince uses fams in place of fans
 to symbolize that his supporters are his family.  Although ostracized by an
 industry that once adored him, his legion of fams is still quite strong.  Over
 the last week, they have flocked to download a new, Napster-only song, "The
 Work -- Part 1" and have instantly made it one of the most downloaded songs in
 Napster history.
     Wingspan Records is the ideal company to be marketing and distributing the
 Prince music through retail stores.  Despite being the most successful
 independent hip-hop label of the last two years, with five consecutive top
 20 Billboard Rap Singles, it has steadfastly remained independent of major
 label involvement in the distribution of its music.
     "We've developed a network of distributors who support us and the music
 that we make," stated Stacey Rogers, national director of promotion. "We're to
 the point where national retail chains respect our product."  With the Prince
 and Angie Stone duet taking off at major metropolitan stations across the
 country, the trend continues.
     Wingspan has its own battles to fight with the establishment's abuse of
 artists.  After releasing the hip-hop version of "Who Let the Dogs Out?" by
 Chuck Smooth in 1998, and developing a publishing partnership with Ozzie
 Gurley, the composer of the music for The Baha Men's version of "Who Let the
 Dogs Out," Wingspan has been in a constant battle with Deston Songs over
 ownership to the publishing of the song.  Deston is a music publishing company
 co-owned by successful songwriter Desmond Child.  Deston contends that its
 agreement with Anslem Douglas, the writer of the words to the song, gives them
 100 percent ownership of the publishing, despite the assertion that Ozzie
 Gurley received no compensation from Deston for his share of the composition
 after being the sole writer of the music.  The dispute is currently in the
 Canadian and New York State court systems.
     Wingspan is owned by Scott Brooks and Charles Fulp, who also own the
 30-store chain of One-Stop Cellular wireless communication stores.  Both in
 their early 30s, these entrepreneurs have created an impressive track record
 of proven, on-going success.
     "We're confident that the rights of the artist will win out in the end
 over the tyranny of big business," stated Scott Brooks.  "It's present in our
 dispute with Deston, but even more obvious in how the music industry has
 disrespected Prince."
     "We're excited about the opportunity to support Prince and help get this
 song out.  Prince made a great song and people deserve to have the chance to
 enjoy it," stated Charles Fulp.
 
     CONTACT:  Stacey Rogers of Wingspan Records 804-797-2155, or
               slice@wingspanrecords.com
 
     This release was issued through DigitalWork.com -- Your Business Workshop.
 For more information visit: http://www.digitalwork.com.
 
 SOURCE  Wingspan Records