Women's Choices and Their Consequences: April Symposium to Explore Women's Economic Decision-Making

Noted Financial Management Expert Erica Whitlinger and Nationally Known Public

Policy Expert Heidi Hartmann Are Among a Distinguished Lineup of Speakers And

Panelists



Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from Center for True Economic Progress

    ST. PAUL, Minn., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A two-day symposium of
 researchers, policymakers, educators and activists will explore the causes and
 consequences of women's economic decisions on April 27-28 at the Sheraton
 Midway at Hamline Avenue and I-94 in St. Paul.
     The symposium, "Critical Junctures in Women's Economic Lives," is being
 sponsored by the Center for True Economic Progress, a Minnesota activist think
 tank whose mission is "the movement of women to the forefront of economic
 decision-making."  Co-sponsors include the Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics
 Foundation, Inc.; the College of St. Catherine; the Federal Reserve Bank of
 Minneapolis; and WomenVenture.
     Panelists and keynote speakers will tackle such topics as women in
 business, the status of women in Minnesota, child care and family leave,
 discrimination, retirement, women in business, personal investment, women and
 the structure of poverty, national public policy changes, and why there are so
 few women in the field of economics.
     Speakers will include the nation's leading women economists, as well as
 local financial experts and policy makers.  Noted Twin Cities financial
 management expert Erica Whitlinger of Whitlinger Capital Management will be
 among the presenters.  Heidi Hartmann, a Yale educated economist and President
 and CEO of the Washington-based Institute for Women's Policy, will be a
 keynote speaker.  In 1994 Hartmann received a MacArthur fellowship award,
 commonly referred to as the 'genius grant,' for her pioneering work in the
 field of women and economics.
     Judith Pinke, chair of the board of the Center for True Economic Progress,
 said the Critical Junctures project began last year with a series of informal
 focus groups.  Eighty-eight Minnesota women from a wide variety of backgrounds
 identified the decision points and factors in their lives that had, or will
 have, the most impact on their economic well-being.
     Economist and board member Sarah West added, "These women bring multiple
 perspectives to economic decisions.  They challenge existing assumptions in
 the field of economics about how people make choices, when they report that
 such decisions must balance complicated social and familial expectations and
 needs, not just focus on the best personal Choice."
     Pinke said the symposium will address ways to help women become more
 informed, deliberate, and vocal about the economic matters that affect them,
 their families, and the society and economy in which they participate.  These
 issues will be reviewed in the context of women's learning styles, which the
 focus group participants said tend to rely on family and friends for advice
 and downplay the roles of schools and financial institutions in providing
 reliable information.
     The symposium is open to the public.  The two-day registration fee is $85.
 One-day registration fees and student discounts are also available.
     For a registration form, a research brief about the focus groups, or more
 information, contact the Center for True Economic Progress at 651-293-1222.
 
 

SOURCE Center for True Economic Progress
    ST. PAUL, Minn., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- A two-day symposium of
 researchers, policymakers, educators and activists will explore the causes and
 consequences of women's economic decisions on April 27-28 at the Sheraton
 Midway at Hamline Avenue and I-94 in St. Paul.
     The symposium, "Critical Junctures in Women's Economic Lives," is being
 sponsored by the Center for True Economic Progress, a Minnesota activist think
 tank whose mission is "the movement of women to the forefront of economic
 decision-making."  Co-sponsors include the Calvin K. Kazanjian Economics
 Foundation, Inc.; the College of St. Catherine; the Federal Reserve Bank of
 Minneapolis; and WomenVenture.
     Panelists and keynote speakers will tackle such topics as women in
 business, the status of women in Minnesota, child care and family leave,
 discrimination, retirement, women in business, personal investment, women and
 the structure of poverty, national public policy changes, and why there are so
 few women in the field of economics.
     Speakers will include the nation's leading women economists, as well as
 local financial experts and policy makers.  Noted Twin Cities financial
 management expert Erica Whitlinger of Whitlinger Capital Management will be
 among the presenters.  Heidi Hartmann, a Yale educated economist and President
 and CEO of the Washington-based Institute for Women's Policy, will be a
 keynote speaker.  In 1994 Hartmann received a MacArthur fellowship award,
 commonly referred to as the 'genius grant,' for her pioneering work in the
 field of women and economics.
     Judith Pinke, chair of the board of the Center for True Economic Progress,
 said the Critical Junctures project began last year with a series of informal
 focus groups.  Eighty-eight Minnesota women from a wide variety of backgrounds
 identified the decision points and factors in their lives that had, or will
 have, the most impact on their economic well-being.
     Economist and board member Sarah West added, "These women bring multiple
 perspectives to economic decisions.  They challenge existing assumptions in
 the field of economics about how people make choices, when they report that
 such decisions must balance complicated social and familial expectations and
 needs, not just focus on the best personal Choice."
     Pinke said the symposium will address ways to help women become more
 informed, deliberate, and vocal about the economic matters that affect them,
 their families, and the society and economy in which they participate.  These
 issues will be reviewed in the context of women's learning styles, which the
 focus group participants said tend to rely on family and friends for advice
 and downplay the roles of schools and financial institutions in providing
 reliable information.
     The symposium is open to the public.  The two-day registration fee is $85.
 One-day registration fees and student discounts are also available.
     For a registration form, a research brief about the focus groups, or more
 information, contact the Center for True Economic Progress at 651-293-1222.
 
 SOURCE  Center for True Economic Progress