Working Parents 'Get Away with More'

Latest HRnext Poll Reveals Volatile Issue



Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from HRnext

    OLD SAYBROOK, Conn., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Working parents are widely
 viewed as receiving more lenient working conditions than non-parent workers,
 according to the latest HRnext poll.
     "Sixty six percent of respondents to HRnext's April 2 poll said they think
 working parents get away with more at work than non-parent workers," reported
 John Brady, HRnext's President.  Less than one third, 29 percent, said they
 felt everyone received the same treatment, while 4 percent said they felt
 working parents get away with less.
 
     A Hot Issue
     This topic created an unusually active and sometimes emotional discussion
 among the HR professionals visiting HRnext's Community area.
     "In theory, I think we want to treat all employees equally, but we
 'unofficially' expect less from working parents," Ramona Robertson of
 Precision Dynamics Midwest of Belleville, Kansas posted on HRnext.
     Most of the comments followed the poll's results closely, with a majority
 indicating working parents have it easier. However, some disagreed.
     "Working parents certainly do have unplanned issues, but you can say the
 same of employees with sick or elderly parents or personal health concerns,"
 posted Sue Osborn, HR Administrator at ROSS Controls, based in Troy, Mich.
     "There are no hard and fast rules when in comes to parents vs.
 non-parents," noted Shari Rosen Ascher, half of Team Shaggie at ShareGoals of
 New York City. " There are dedicated employees and there are 'less than
 dedicated' employees."
 
     Parents Supported
     A study published by the Employment Policy Foundation found that parents
 enjoy lower levels of unemployment, earn higher salaries, and work more hours
 than those without children.  John Brady of HRnext commented: "There is
 probably a lot of self-selection here. Parents face a challenge to support the
 growth and education of their children.  It's not surprising that some parents
 work harder -- they have to.  Our survey is actually encouraging, because it
 shows that in spite of some controversy over who is getting more favorable
 treatment, most workplaces are allowing employees to attend to their needs
 outside the workplace."
 
     Web address:  http://www.benefitsnext.com
 
     About HRnext
     HRnext.com and its sister site, BENEFITSnext.com, are wholly owned
 subsidiaries of Business & Legal Reports, Inc., which has been publishing HR,
 environmental and safety compliance materials since 1977.
 
 

SOURCE HRnext
    OLD SAYBROOK, Conn., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Working parents are widely
 viewed as receiving more lenient working conditions than non-parent workers,
 according to the latest HRnext poll.
     "Sixty six percent of respondents to HRnext's April 2 poll said they think
 working parents get away with more at work than non-parent workers," reported
 John Brady, HRnext's President.  Less than one third, 29 percent, said they
 felt everyone received the same treatment, while 4 percent said they felt
 working parents get away with less.
 
     A Hot Issue
     This topic created an unusually active and sometimes emotional discussion
 among the HR professionals visiting HRnext's Community area.
     "In theory, I think we want to treat all employees equally, but we
 'unofficially' expect less from working parents," Ramona Robertson of
 Precision Dynamics Midwest of Belleville, Kansas posted on HRnext.
     Most of the comments followed the poll's results closely, with a majority
 indicating working parents have it easier. However, some disagreed.
     "Working parents certainly do have unplanned issues, but you can say the
 same of employees with sick or elderly parents or personal health concerns,"
 posted Sue Osborn, HR Administrator at ROSS Controls, based in Troy, Mich.
     "There are no hard and fast rules when in comes to parents vs.
 non-parents," noted Shari Rosen Ascher, half of Team Shaggie at ShareGoals of
 New York City. " There are dedicated employees and there are 'less than
 dedicated' employees."
 
     Parents Supported
     A study published by the Employment Policy Foundation found that parents
 enjoy lower levels of unemployment, earn higher salaries, and work more hours
 than those without children.  John Brady of HRnext commented: "There is
 probably a lot of self-selection here. Parents face a challenge to support the
 growth and education of their children.  It's not surprising that some parents
 work harder -- they have to.  Our survey is actually encouraging, because it
 shows that in spite of some controversy over who is getting more favorable
 treatment, most workplaces are allowing employees to attend to their needs
 outside the workplace."
 
     Web address:  http://www.benefitsnext.com
 
     About HRnext
     HRnext.com and its sister site, BENEFITSnext.com, are wholly owned
 subsidiaries of Business & Legal Reports, Inc., which has been publishing HR,
 environmental and safety compliance materials since 1977.
 
 SOURCE  HRnext