World Championship of Hand Hygiene To Be Held Tuesday, April 17 at Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C.

Kimberly-Clark Sponsors Handwashing Event at Food Safety Summit



Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from Kimberly-Clark Professional

    WASHINGTON, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The folks responsible for the safety
 of much of the country's food supply will put their hygiene skills to the test
 when they compete in the Third Annual "Handwashing Olympics," Tuesday,
 April 17 at 1:00 p.m. at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010403/KCLARKLOGO )
     The challenge will be to see how well participants wash their hands after
 touching a solution containing plastic fluorescent particles, which glow under
 UV light if not removed by handwashing.
     The event, sponsored by Kimberly-Clark Corporation, is organized by and
 will be held at the Food Safety Summit and Expo.  It underscores the
 importance of proper handwashing in preventing cross-contamination, which can
 lead to the spread of foodborne illnesses.
     "According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in
 four foodborne illness outbreaks can be linked to poor hygiene, generally
 unwashed or poorly washed hands," says Amy Walker Barrs, food processing
 market segment manager, Kimberly-Clark Professional.  "That's why the CDC says
 that handwashing is the single most important means of preventing the spread
 of infections like foodborne diseases, which result in up to 75 million
 illnesses and approximately 5,000 deaths in the U.S. each year."
     "At first blush, handwashing appears to be a `no-brainer'," Barrs says.
 "After all, we've all been taught about handwashing from the time we were in
 pre-school.  But, studies have shown that folks don't wash their hands as
 often as they say they do, or as often as they should."
     For workers in food-related industries, there are strict government
 regulations about when and how to wash up.  For example, the Food and Drug
 Administration's 1999 Food Code provides explicit handwashing instructions for
 foodservice workers, and food processing plants address handwashing as a
 "critical control point" in their efforts to institute HACCP (Hazard Analysis
 Critical Control Point) programs as required by the U.S. Department of
 Agriculture.
 
     Testing Handwashing Skills and Products
     Participants in the Handwashing event -- professionals responsible for
 quality assurance, plant management, sanitation and hygiene at leading food
 processing and retail food companies -- will put the latest handwashing
 products and methods to the test as they attempt to demonstrate their
 handwashing prowess.
     Participants will begin by rubbing their hands with a solution that, like
 bacteria, cannot be seen by the naked eye.  Any solution that remains on the
 hands after they are washed, dried and sanitized will glow under ultraviolet
 light -- immediately separating the "good" handwashers from the bad.
     "The process should open a few eyes," says Barrs, who points to steps in
 the handwashing process that are cause for concern.  "In addition to following
 the proper handwashing procedures, you have to look at everything your hands
 come into contact with -- from the dispensers used for soap and towels to the
 door handle you touch on the way out of the washroom."
     Kimberly-Clark offers a variety of "no-touch" dispensers for soap and hand
 towel products, so users don't have to touch any part of the dispenser itself,
 thus reducing the potential for cross-contamination.  For example, the
 SaniTouch(R) No-Touch HACCP Roll Towel Dispenser lets people grab a towel
 without having to touch any cranks or levers.  The SaniTouch(TM) Skin Care
 Dispenser uses an infrared sensor to automatically deliver the right amount of
 soap or hand sanitizer to the hands.
     For more information on Kimberly-Clark products, contact your Kimberly-
 Clark representative, or call 1-888-346-GOKC (4652).
     Kimberly-Clark Corporation is a leading global manufacturer of tissue,
 personal care and health care products.  The company's global brands include
 Huggies(R), Pull-Ups(R), Kotex(R), Depend(R), Kleenex(R), Scott(R),
 Kimberly-Clark(R), Tecnol(R), KimWipes(R) and WypAll(R).  Other brands well
 known outside the U.S. include Andrex(R), Scottex(R), Page(R), Popee(R) and
 Kimbies(R).  Kimberly-Clark also is a major producer of premium business,
 correspondence and technical papers.  The company has manufacturing operations
 in 41 countries and sells its products in more than 150 countries.
     Kimberly-Clark Professional provides tissue and towel products, skin care
 products and industrial wipers for workplace settings.
 
     (R)Registered Trademarks and (TM)Trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corporation
 or its affiliates.
 
 

SOURCE Kimberly-Clark Professional
    WASHINGTON, April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The folks responsible for the safety
 of much of the country's food supply will put their hygiene skills to the test
 when they compete in the Third Annual "Handwashing Olympics," Tuesday,
 April 17 at 1:00 p.m. at the Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010403/KCLARKLOGO )
     The challenge will be to see how well participants wash their hands after
 touching a solution containing plastic fluorescent particles, which glow under
 UV light if not removed by handwashing.
     The event, sponsored by Kimberly-Clark Corporation, is organized by and
 will be held at the Food Safety Summit and Expo.  It underscores the
 importance of proper handwashing in preventing cross-contamination, which can
 lead to the spread of foodborne illnesses.
     "According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in
 four foodborne illness outbreaks can be linked to poor hygiene, generally
 unwashed or poorly washed hands," says Amy Walker Barrs, food processing
 market segment manager, Kimberly-Clark Professional.  "That's why the CDC says
 that handwashing is the single most important means of preventing the spread
 of infections like foodborne diseases, which result in up to 75 million
 illnesses and approximately 5,000 deaths in the U.S. each year."
     "At first blush, handwashing appears to be a `no-brainer'," Barrs says.
 "After all, we've all been taught about handwashing from the time we were in
 pre-school.  But, studies have shown that folks don't wash their hands as
 often as they say they do, or as often as they should."
     For workers in food-related industries, there are strict government
 regulations about when and how to wash up.  For example, the Food and Drug
 Administration's 1999 Food Code provides explicit handwashing instructions for
 foodservice workers, and food processing plants address handwashing as a
 "critical control point" in their efforts to institute HACCP (Hazard Analysis
 Critical Control Point) programs as required by the U.S. Department of
 Agriculture.
 
     Testing Handwashing Skills and Products
     Participants in the Handwashing event -- professionals responsible for
 quality assurance, plant management, sanitation and hygiene at leading food
 processing and retail food companies -- will put the latest handwashing
 products and methods to the test as they attempt to demonstrate their
 handwashing prowess.
     Participants will begin by rubbing their hands with a solution that, like
 bacteria, cannot be seen by the naked eye.  Any solution that remains on the
 hands after they are washed, dried and sanitized will glow under ultraviolet
 light -- immediately separating the "good" handwashers from the bad.
     "The process should open a few eyes," says Barrs, who points to steps in
 the handwashing process that are cause for concern.  "In addition to following
 the proper handwashing procedures, you have to look at everything your hands
 come into contact with -- from the dispensers used for soap and towels to the
 door handle you touch on the way out of the washroom."
     Kimberly-Clark offers a variety of "no-touch" dispensers for soap and hand
 towel products, so users don't have to touch any part of the dispenser itself,
 thus reducing the potential for cross-contamination.  For example, the
 SaniTouch(R) No-Touch HACCP Roll Towel Dispenser lets people grab a towel
 without having to touch any cranks or levers.  The SaniTouch(TM) Skin Care
 Dispenser uses an infrared sensor to automatically deliver the right amount of
 soap or hand sanitizer to the hands.
     For more information on Kimberly-Clark products, contact your Kimberly-
 Clark representative, or call 1-888-346-GOKC (4652).
     Kimberly-Clark Corporation is a leading global manufacturer of tissue,
 personal care and health care products.  The company's global brands include
 Huggies(R), Pull-Ups(R), Kotex(R), Depend(R), Kleenex(R), Scott(R),
 Kimberly-Clark(R), Tecnol(R), KimWipes(R) and WypAll(R).  Other brands well
 known outside the U.S. include Andrex(R), Scottex(R), Page(R), Popee(R) and
 Kimbies(R).  Kimberly-Clark also is a major producer of premium business,
 correspondence and technical papers.  The company has manufacturing operations
 in 41 countries and sells its products in more than 150 countries.
     Kimberly-Clark Professional provides tissue and towel products, skin care
 products and industrial wipers for workplace settings.
 
     (R)Registered Trademarks and (TM)Trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corporation
 or its affiliates.
 
 SOURCE  Kimberly-Clark Professional