President Obama's BP Speech Hits the Low-Water Mark Among Americans

Jun 18, 2010, 13:00 ET from HCD Research

FLEMINGTON, N.J., June 18 /PRNewswire/ -- A series of national media studies conducted on President Obama's speeches during his seventeen months in office revealed that Americans ranked his speech on the BP oil spill as the lowest ranked speech to date.

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The studies were conducted by HCD Research, using its MediaCurves.com® website from January 2009 to June 2010, to obtain Americans' perceptions of various speeches that were given by President Barack Obama during his term in office.

The series of studies were conducted on major speeches given by President Obama to derive the overall ratings for each speech. The ratings were based on a scale of 1-7, which was used to measure viewers' perceptions of the president's likeability, believability and sincerity after viewing each speech.  

President Obama's highest rated speech was his speech to congress in January 2009, which earned a rating of 5.5. In contrast, his speech on Tuesday ranked the lowest of all speeches, with an overall rating of 4.4.

Following are the speeches that were tested during his term in office. To view detailed results for each study, go to www.mediacurves.com.


Speech

Date of Speech

Overall Rating

State of the Union

1/27/2009

5.5

Muslim World

6/4/2009

5.1

Education Speech

9/9/2009

5.0

Health Care

9/10/2009

5.0

Obama on GM

6/2/2009

4.9

Obama to Al Qaeda

3/30/2010

4.9

Wall Street Reform

4/23/2010

4.8

Obama to BP

6/15/2010

4.4




HCD Research, is a marketing and communications research company headquartered in Flemington, NJ.  The company's services include traditional and web-based research.  For additional information on HCD Research, access the company's web site at www.hcdi.net or call HCD Research at 908-788-9393.  MediaCurves.com® (www.mediacurves.com) is a media measurement website that provides the media and general public with a venue to view Americans' perceptions of popular and controversial media events and advertisements.

SOURCE HCD Research



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