Reportlinker Adds European Tourist Attractions- 2010 Edition

Jan 12, 2010, 10:23 ET from Reportlinker

NEW YORK, Jan. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

European Tourist Attractions- 2010 Edition

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0171102/European-Tourist-Attractions--2010-Edition.html

Like bees buzzing around a hive, tourists come to visit Europe's main attractions in vast droves. 'Honeypots' have often developed around specific attractions, providing knock-on benefits for the locality. Conversely, visitors sometimes arrive in city centres simply because that is where their transport has taken them there and end up paying to enter attractions without having planned to do so.

An example of the former cited in this Market Assessment report is the Basilica of Sacre Coeur, which is perched on a hill overlooking Paris. The basilica itself is spectacular but its appeal is interwoven with the chance for tourists to wander along to the famous Place du Tertre with its cafés and pavement artists, itself within a short distance of the famous Moulin Rouge theatre.

Thus Sacre Coeur is the centre of a honeypot area within a city that is itself Europe's major attraction, featuring historic icons such as the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre Museum and also hosting — less than an hour from the city — Europe's largest commercial attraction, Disneyland Resort Paris.

Given the local links between these attractions, it is difficult to draw up a league table of European attractions, but the Paris region is generally acknowledged to be the market leader (globally and within Europe). Other clusters of major international attractions producing notable honeypots are London, Rome and Venice, with a dozen other European cities vying for top-ten rankings, from Madrid in the West to Istanbul in the East.

Attractions can broadly be divided into two groups: historic and modern. Historic appeal often springs from a whole area, producing honeypots such as the old town centres of Barcelona (Barri Gotic), Dublin (Temple Bar) and Krakow. These town centres are often attractive in themselves, particularly if they have been left unmodernised but pedestrianised, while others are locations of famous buildings (e.g. Medieval cathedrals and castles, or national museums and art galleries).

Classification is difficult because many attractions have unique characters, examples including the 'floating city' of Venice, the Vatican in Rome, the Acropolis in Athens and Germany's spectacular Neuschwanstein castle (the model for Disney's Sleeping Beauty castle). In contrast to these locally rooted attractions are Europe's great museums, such as the British Museum and the Hermitage in St Petersburg, which have gathered together art and artefacts from many countries.

On the 'modern' side of the business are attractions such as hi-tech, educational museums, new public buildings and modern art galleries, but the great volume of tourism is generated by theme parks, which continue to expand. Typically, major theme parks have added hotels to their sites to turn them into tourist resorts, the major example being Europe's outstanding park, Disneyland Resort Paris (originally known as Euro Disney).

With more than 15 million visitors a year, Disneyland has four times the number of admissions of the largest 'indigenous' parks. Nevertheless, these are highly significant for domestic tourism, leading examples including Phantasialand (Germany), PortAventura (Spain) and Alton Towers (the UK). Most parks are independent and local, but several international groups have emerged in the 2000s, led by Merlin Entertainments (UK based), Compagnie des Alpes (France) and Parques Reunidos (Spain).

Official figures from the EU show declines in tourism for most European countries in 2008 and 2009, as would be expected in a global recession. However, the silver lining on the cloud is domestic tourism, since consumers are more likely than usual to stay at home for holidays, instead of going abroad, and might, therefore, spend more time visiting local attractions.

The market has broadened out as more countries have acceded to the EU, their populations taking part in European life more fully. There are now 27 countries in the EU, the majority of which also share, or wish eventually to share, the same currency.

This integration brings Eastern European visitors to the honeypots of Western Europe but, at the same time, it has encouraged outbound tourism by Western Europeans to Eastern Europe. Of key importance in this activity has been the growth of low-cost airlines such as easyJet and Air Berlin, which fly between smaller towns and cities than the flag-carrier airlines, opening up the potential for new destinations.

Meanwhile, an even more significant future trend for Europe's tourism will be the arrival of more visitors from the rapidly industrialising Brazil, Russia, India and China (known as the BRIC countries). These visitors will bring fresh demand for Europe's historic sites.

Executive Summary

1. Introduction

DEFINITIONS

Europe/European

Tourist Attractions

STATISTICAL SOURCES

2. Strategic Overview

EUROPEAN BACKGROUND

20th Century: World Wars and Communism

21st Century: Peace but Terrorism and Recession

Growth of the EU

EU Enlargement

GLOBAL TOURISM

NATIONAL ECONOMIES

Table 2.1: European and US Gross Domestic Product at Current Market Prices (Euro bn), 2003-2007

Table 2.2: Index of European Gross Domestic Product Per Capita in Selected Countries (EU-27=100), 2003-2008

EUROPE'S HONEYPOTS

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION OF ATTRACTIONS

UNESCO World Heritage

Table 2.3: Major World Heritage Sites as Tourist Attractions, 1978-2009

EU Capitals of Culture

Table 2.4: EU Cities of Culture, 1985-2000

ATTRACTION OWNERSHIP

EUROPE'S TOP ATTRACTIONS?

SMALL-SCALE ATTRACTIONS

EUROPEAN CITIES MARKETING

3. Tourism Flows in Europe

INTRODUCTION

POPULATION

Table 3.1: Populations of Selected Countries in Europe (million inhabitants), 2004 and 2008

Table 3.2: Europe's Largest Cities by Population (000), 2008

OUTBOUND TOURISM

INFRASTRUCTURE INFLUENCES

Air Travel

Accommodation

INBOUND SPENDING AND ARRIVALS

Table 3.3: Leading Inbound Markets in Europe by Expenditure and Arrivals ($bn, million and $), 2008

Table 3.4: Inbound Tourist Spending in Europe by Top Countries ($bn), 2006-2008

Table 3.5: Tourist Arrivals in Europe by Top Countries (million), 1995 and 2005-2008

NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR INBOUND TOURISM

DOMESTIC TOURISM

Table 3.6: Nights in Accommodation by Domestic Tourists in Selected Countries (million), 2001 and 2006-2008

Table 3.7: Holidays Taken in Own Country and Abroad from Selected Countries (% of holidays), 2009

4. Types and Owners of European Attractions

INTRODUCTION

TYPES OF ATTRACTION

Table 4.1: Principal Categories of Tourist Attraction, 2009

'Old Town' Centres

Ecclesiastical Attractions

Cultural Collections

Castles, Palaces and Stately Homes

Commercial Attractions

Educational Attractions

Other Attractions

WORLD HERITAGE AND CAPITALS OF CULTURE

Table 4.2: EU Capitals of Culture, 2001-2019

THEME PARKS IN EUROPE

Disneyland Resort Paris

Table 4.3: Timeline of Disney Theme Parks, 1955-2005

Table 4.4: Financial Data for Euro Disney SCA (million and Euro m), Years Ending September 2004-2008

Merlin Entertainments

Compagnie des Alpes

Parques Reunidos

Other Parks

Table 4.5: Major European Theme Parks, 2009

5. Spain

DESTINATION PROFILE

Table 5.1: The Population and Gross Domestic Product of Spain (million and Euro bn), 2002-2007

Table 5.2: Inbound Tourism Indicators for Spain — Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (million and $bn), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 5.3: Spain's Share of the European Inbound Tourism Market by Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (%), 1995 and 2005-2008

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

Barcelona

Madrid

Other Attractions

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

6. France

DESTINATION PROFILE

Table 6.1: The Population and Gross Domestic Product of France (million and Euro bn), 2002-2007

Table 6.2: Inbound Tourism Indicators for France — Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (million and $bn), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 6.3: France's Share of the European Inbound Tourism Market by Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (%), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 6.4: Admissions to Cultural and Recreational Sites in France (million), 2003-2007

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

Paris

Table 6.5: The Eiffel Tower: Events and Admissions, 1889-2009

Other Attractions

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

7. Italy

DESTINATION PROFILE

Table 7.1: The Population and Gross Domestic Product of Italy (million and Euro bn), 2002-2007

Table 7.2: Inbound Tourism Indicators for Italy — Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (million and $bn), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 7.3: Italy's Share of the European Inbound Tourism Market by Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (%), 1995 and 2005-2008

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

Rome

Venice

Other Attractions

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

8. The UK

DESTINATION PROFILE

Table 8.1: The Population and Gross Domestic Product of the UK (million and Euro bn), 2002-2007

Table 8.2: Inbound Tourism Indicators for the UK — Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (million and $bn), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 8.3: The UK's Share of the European Inbound Tourism Market by Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (%), 1995 and 2005-2008

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

London

Table 8.4: Leisure Visits to London and Expenditure by Visitors from Other Countries (000 visits and £m), 2002-2008

Table 8.5: Admissions to Major Attractions in London (million), 2006-2008

Other Attractions

Table 8.6: Admissions to Major UK Attractions Outside London (000), 2008

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

9. Germany

DESTINATION PROFILE

Table 9.1: The Population and Gross Domestic Product of Germany (million and Euro bn), 2002-2007

Table 9.2: Inbound Tourism Indicators for Germany — Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (million and $bn), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 9.3: Germany's Share of the European Inbound Tourism Market by Number of Tourist Arrivals and Inbound Tourist Spending (%), 1995 and 2005-2008

Table 9.3: Bed Nights in Berlin by Domestic and Foreign Visitors (million), 1993 and 2004-2008

MAJOR ATTRACTIONS

Berlin

Other Attractions

INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

10. Other Countries

TURKEY

AUSTRIA

GREECE

OTHERS

11. The Future

RECESSION 2008 TO...?

DOMESTIC REVIVAL

PRICING CHANGES

GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION

OPENING NEW DESTINATIONS

... AND NEW ORIGINS

A RESILIENT MARKET

12. Further Sources

Associations

General Sources

Government Publications

Other Sources

Key Note Sources

Key Note Research

The Key Note Range of Reports

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Tourism Industry: European Tourist Attractions- 2010 Edition

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Nicolas Bombourg

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