The New Yorker Magazine's Roz Chast to Keynote Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis Annual Benefit

Award-Winning Cartoonist to Share Empathy & Humor From Her Memoir "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?"

HUMAN SPIRIT AWARD TO BE PRESENTED IN MEMORY OF STEVEN LaVOIE

Mar 19, 2015, 11:50 ET from The Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis

CHICAGO, March 19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Acclaimed New Yorker magazine cartoonist Roz Chast will share her humor and exceptionally honest experiences about caring for aging and ill parents depicted in her personal memoir, "Can't We Talk About Something More Honest?" at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis Annual Benefit on May 13, 2015, at the Standard Club, 320 S. Plymouth Court, Chicago.

Brilliantly interpreting everyday situations, Chast's cartoons capture "our neurotic worries and genuine fears, our mundane and existential anxieties, our daydreams, nightmares, insecurities and guilty regrets," says Michiko Kakutani in The New York Times.  Chast's drawings and books speak to the human concerns that are at the core of the theory and values of psychoanalysis.  Her graphic autobiography "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?" tells a daughter's story about aging parents, family life, love, suffering and loss.  In this and all her work, Chast conveys attentiveness to spoken and unspoken words and feelings with wry humor that addresses our most fundamental concerns about living.

The Institute will use the occasion to honor the late Steven LaVoie with its Human Spirit Award. A longtime, dedicated member of the Institute's Board of Trustees, LaVoie was a vocal advocate about the power of psychoanalysis in transforming lives, including his own.  Professionally, he was the CEO of ArrowStream, a company he founded in 2000.

"Steve embodied the mission and values of the Institute," said Board of Trustees Chair Arthur Sussman.  LaVoie's wife Jody will accept the award on his behalf, with their daughters, Katie, Sarah and Caroline.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  Roz Chast has loved to draw cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn. She attended Rhode Island School of Design, majoring in Painting because it seemed more artistic. However, soon after graduating, she reverted to type and began drawing cartoons once again.  In addition to The New Yorker, her cartoons have also been published in many other magazines, including Scientific American, the Harvard Business ReviewRedbook, and Mother Jones.  Among her many awards and accolades, on March 12 she was awarded "Best Autobiography" by the National Book Critics Circle.

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE:  The Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis provides professional education in the theory and practice of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.  Through its clinics for adults and children, the Institute offers services at reduced fees for the benefit of under-served communities.  In addition, the Institute's faculty, graduates and students contribute to scholarship, research and advocacy in public discourse about mental health issues. 

MEDIA INQUIRIES: CONTACT HEALY CONSULTING & COMMUNICATIONS AT 312-643-1987 OR info@healyco.com

EVENT-RELATED AND CHICAGO INSTITUTE INQUIRIES: CONTACT CHRIS SUSMAN AT 312-922-7474, x324 or development@chicagoanalysis.org

 

SOURCE The Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis



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