U.S. Colonel Discusses How ACL Audit Technology Helps Government Agencies Reduce Improper Payments and Save Taxpayer Dollars

Aug 04, 2011, 09:00 ET from ACL Services, Ltd.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ --

WHO: Retired Colonel William J. Kelley, Director for Data Mining, Office of the Inspector General, US Department of Defense (DOD) and Greg Thomas, Director of Federal Government Practice, ACL Services, Ltd.

WHAT: A TV webcast interview with Col. Kelley on how the DOD applied ACL audit technology to analyze almost US $300 billion in payments. He also comments on the Improper Payments Elimination Act and how audit technology can help government agencies become more effective at preventing and recovering improper payments.

ACL Services is a leading provider of business assurance technology for audit and compliance professionals, helping 89 percent of the Fortune 500 as well as hundreds of national, state and local government agencies cut fraud, waste and abuse, and become more efficient and effective.  

The interview was recorded at FOSE, the largest government information technology event in the US, providing executive-level education on the latest IT trends to more than 10,000 senior-level IT decision makers from federal, state, local, and international government.

WHY: The President instructed his Administration to reduce improper payments by $50 million by 2012 (1) – but how can this be done efficiently?

Audit software serves a pivotal role in providing adequate transparency and appropriate accountability in government and business. According to Col. Kelley, audit technology enables agencies to do forensics work and "test 100% of the transactions, to then array those transactions based on risk, and then you apply resources to transactions that rated high and determine if you can recoup some of that money." For example, the DOD tested transactions in the following areas:

  • Communications
  • Purchase cards
  • Acquisition
  • Payroll

HIGHLIGHTS: Although historically recovered funds would go to the Treasury, the new Act provides "the opportunity to share the funds so that they could actually go back into their system and apply that money to better oversight. And when you're talking billions of dollars of improper payments, that's a pretty good thing for the taxpayer," says Col. Kelley.

WHERE: To watch the interview, visit the ACL Blog. (Runtime: 4:51)

(1) White House blog

SOURCE ACL Services, Ltd.



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