Workplace Report for National Boss Day, October 15, 2010

What Are The Most Important Differences Between High-Performers And Low-Performers? High-Performers Refuse To Be Undermanaged!

Oct 13, 2010, 09:00 ET from RainmakerThinking, Inc.

NEW HAVEN, Conn., Oct. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is a report by Bruce Tulgan of RainmakerThinking, Inc.:

WHEN IT COMES TO ATTITUDES ABOUT THEIR BOSS, WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN HIGH PERFORMERS AND LOW PERFORMERS?

LOW-PERFORMERS TEND BY WIDE MARGINS TO BELIEVE:

- "My boss should take primary responsibility for making our working relationship successful."

- "If my boss doesn't give me what I need to be successful, then he/she can't expect me to do a great job."

- "Most people, including me, do their best work when they are left alone to manage themselves."

- "It is fair when managers treat every employee the same."

- "Being 'coached' on your performance is usually bad news."

- "If your boss doesn't require it, you don't need to keep track of your performance in writing."

HIGH PERFORMERS TEND BY WIDE MARGINS TO BELIEVE:

- "It is MY responsibility to maintain a successful working relationship with my boss."

- "It is MY responsibility to help my boss help me do a great job."  

- "Most people, including me, do their best work when they have guidance, direction and support from a more experienced person."

- "Treating everybody the same is totally unfair."

- "Helping your boss nitpick at the small mistakes and problems in your work sends a message that you realize that details matter."

- "You owe it to yourself and the organization to keep track of everything you do in writing."

BACKGROUND

Since 1993, RainmakerThinking, Inc. has conducted ongoing research on the dynamics of supervisory relationships in the changing workplace.  Late in 2002, we began to focus our research on an alarming pattern: We found that a huge preponderance of those in leadership positions were severely "undermanaging" their direct reports on a day to day basis.  In June 2004, we released a report of our preliminary research on undermanagement, titled THE UNDERMANAGEMENT EPIDEMIC.  Since June 2004, our research has continued and intensified. We've conducted thousands of interviews and hundreds of focus groups including many thousands of participants.

ABOUT RAINMAKERTHINKING, INC.

RainmakerThinking, Inc. Research has been the source of information for eighteen books, including Bruce's new book, IT'S OKAY TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS (September 14). Bruce is the founder and chairman of RainmakerThinking.  Contact us via www.rainmakerthinking.com.

SOURCE RainmakerThinking, Inc.



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