American Skin Association Honors Leading Physicians and Scientists; Journalist Deborah Norville

Event Supports Education Programs, Recently Cited by Centers for Disease Control As Crucial to Fight Against Melanoma

Oct 26, 2011, 10:11 ET from American Skin Association

NEW YORK, Oct. 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- One week after a CDC report outlined the devastating nature of melanoma, the most serious of skin cancers, which causes 8,000 U.S. deaths and costs billions of dollars each year, American Skin Association (ASA), a collaboration of patients, families, advocates, physicians and scientists, last night honored leading physicians and scientists who have made groundbreaking discoveries and unique contributions to the field of dermatology and the treatment of skin cancer as well as other devastating skin disorders.  

Also honored was journalist Deborah Norville, who received ASA's Education Award.

In addition to raising funds for cutting-edge skin disease research, ASA's Gala helps underwrite educational outreach programs for students, directly answering the CDC report's call for new policies and prevention strategies to address the leading preventable causes of melanoma, enabling people to be healthier, live longer and be more productive.  The Report was released on October 19th and is available at:

American Skin Association's mission is to advance research, champion skin health - particularly among children - and drive public awareness about skin disease. ASA's education program provides free instruction in skin health and sun safety to more than 12 million young people, teachers and parents across the United States.

Ms. Norville was selected because of her professional and charitable endeavors, including her anchor position on Inside Edition, as a best-selling author and her involvement in numerous charities, including the Broadcasters Foundation of America and the Girl Scouts Council of Greater New York.

Howard Milstein, Chair, President and CEO of New York Private Bank and Trust and Chairman of American Skin Association said: "With her many contributions as a communicator and educator, Deborah Norville is a perfect fit for our Education Award.  Her work is very relevant to ASA's efforts to inform and engage young people with a message about skin health and sun safety."

ASA also presented awards to physicians and scientists who have made groundbreaking discoveries and unique contributions to the field of dermatology and the treatment of skin cancer.

"I am proud that ASA has recognized these prominent physicians and scientists, dedicated to the fight against serious skin disease," Mr. Milstein said. "Through their innovative work, they embody ASA's mission to make a life-changing difference in critical areas of prevention, detection, treatment and cure."

Dr. Barbara Gilchrest of the Boston University School of Medicine and Chair of ASA's Medical Advisory Committee said: "Our award recipients are leading the charge to prevent, treat, and improve outcomes for patients with melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancers and other serious skin afflictions."  

ASA's honorees in medicine and research are:

Breakthrough Achievements in Translational Cancer Research
Dr. James Allison, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Gideon Bollag, Plexxikon
Dr. Frederic de Sauvage, Genentech, Inc.

Humanitarian Award:
Dr. John Parrish, Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, Harvard Medical School

Lifetime Achievement in Dermatology
Dr. James Graham, retired, formerly Temple University, University of California and Armed Forced Institute of Pathology, among other affiliations
Dr. John Strauss, University of Iowa

The awards were presented by well-regarded physicians in the field of dermatology, and the event Masters of Ceremonies were Broadway legends Rosemary Harris and Tony Roberts.

About American Skin Association

American Skin Association was founded by Dr. George W. Hambrick, a leader in the field of dermatology.  The organization's achievements include:

  • Supporting the work of over 133 exceptional young scientists with the vision, drive and dedication to find new and innovative new ways to prevent, detect and treat skin disease.

  • Committing $7.7 million to advance dermatological research — the key to earlier diagnosis, less invasive therapies and, in time, prevention and cure.

  • Providing free instruction in sun safety and skin health to 12 million children, teachers & parents through award-winning, national public school programs, such as The Wonders of Skin: Looking Good, Being Healthy and ASA's newest initiative for pre-teens and young teens — The Skin You're In.

  • Establishing a model laboratory at Weill Cornell Medical College, which today remains one of the finest research facilities of its kind.

  • Helping Americans to better understand the often devastating impact of skin disease and the skin's irreplaceable role in good health through a free hotline, publications and a Web site developed with The Rockefeller University.

  • Urging government leaders to support increased funding for research, which is today among the National Institutes of Health's lowest priorities.

For more information on American Skin Association, go to

SOURCE American Skin Association