Amgen Reacquires All Product Rights To Prolia® (denosumab), XGEVA® (denosumab) And Vectibix® (panitumumab) From GSK In 48 Countries

Adds Product Rights and Sales in Key Global Expansion Countries

Dec 14, 2015, 16:00 ET from Amgen

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Dec. 14, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN) today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement with GSK to reacquire all of its remaining rights to Prolia® (denosumab), XGEVA® (denosumab) and Vectibix® (panitumumab) in 48 countries in Asia, South America, Europe, Australia and other regions throughout the world. The agreement involves key expansion markets for Amgen including Brazil, China, Colombia, Hong Kong, Israel, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand.

GSK has held select regional rights to Prolia and XGEVA since 2009 and to Vectibix since 2010 under license from Amgen. In 2014, GSK generated approximately $111 million in combined sales from these licenses. Amgen will make undisclosed milestone payments to GSK on signing and on the successful transition of the products back to Amgen. Amgen will book all product sales following this transition.

"This unique agreement with GSK allows Amgen to regain rights to three important growth products, and to directly serve more patients in key expansion markets," said Robert A. Bradway, chairman and chief executive officer of Amgen. "The agreement also allows Amgen to build additional commercial infrastructure in oncology and bone health, two strategically important therapeutic areas for Amgen with emerging late-stage pipeline assets."

Amgen will work closely with GSK to enable a seamless transition for customers and patients. GSK will continue to hold the license and sell and distribute the products for an interim transition period that will vary by country. The majority of markets are planned to be transitioned back to Amgen within a 12-month period. 

Amgen anticipates this transaction to be accretive to adjusted earnings in 2017.

About Prolia® (denosumab)
Prolia is the first approved therapy that specifically targets RANK Ligand, an essential regulator of bone-removing cells (osteoclasts).

Prolia is approved in the U.S. for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. Prolia is also approved for treatment to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture, defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, or multiple risk factors for fracture; or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy.

Prolia is also indicated as a treatment to increase bone mass in women at high risk for fracture receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer and in men at high risk for fracture receiving androgen deprivation therapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer.

Prolia is administered as a single subcutaneous injection of 60 mg once every six months.

Important Safety Information (U.S.)
Prolia is contraindicated in patients with hypocalcemia. Pre-existing hypocalcemia must be corrected prior to initiating Prolia. Prolia is contraindicated in women who are pregnant and may cause fetal harm. Prolia is contraindicated in patients with a history of systemic hypersensitivity to any component of the product. Reactions have included anaphylaxis, facial swelling and urticaria.

Prolia® contains the same active ingredient (denosumab) found in XGEVA®.  Patients receiving Prolia® should not receive XGEVA®.

Clinically significant hypersensitivity including anaphylaxis has been reported with Prolia®. Symptoms have included hypotension, dyspnea, throat tightness, facial and upper airway edema, pruritus, and urticaria. If an anaphylactic or other clinically significant allergic reaction occurs, initiate appropriate therapy and discontinue further use of Prolia®.

Hypocalcemia may worsen with the use of Prolia®, especially in patients with severe renal impairment.  In patients predisposed to hypocalcemia and disturbances of mineral metabolism, clinical monitoring of calcium and mineral levels is highly recommended within 14 days of Prolia® injection. Adequately supplement all patients with calcium and vitamin D.

Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), which can occur spontaneously, is generally associated with tooth extraction and/or local infection with delayed healing, and has been reported in patients receiving Prolia®.  An oral exam should be performed by the prescriber prior to initiation of Prolia®.  A dental examination with appropriate preventive dentistry is recommended prior to treatment in patients with risk factors for ONJ such as invasive dental procedures, diagnosis of cancer, concomitant therapies (e.g. chemotherapy, corticosteroids, angiogenesis inhibitors), poor oral hygiene, and co-morbid disorders.  Good oral hygiene practices should be maintained during treatment with Prolia®

For patients requiring invasive dental procedures, clinical judgment should guide the management plan of each patient.  Patients who are suspected of having or who develop ONJ should receive care by a dentist or an oral surgeon.  Extensive dental surgery to treat ONJ may exacerbate the condition.  Discontinuation of Prolia® should be considered based on individual benefit-risk assessment.

Atypical low-energy, or low trauma fractures of the shaft have been reported in patients receiving Prolia®. Causality has not been established as these fractures also occur in osteoporotic patients who have not been treated with anti-resorptive agents.

During Prolia® treatment, patients should be advised to report new or unusual thigh, hip, or groin pain. Any patient who presents with thigh or groin pain should be evaluated to rule out an incomplete femur fracture. Interruption of Prolia® therapy should be considered, pending a risk/benefit assessment, on an individual basis.

In a clinical trial (N = 7808) in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, serious infections leading to hospitalization were reported more frequently in the Prolia® group than in the placebo group.  Serious skin infections, as well as infections of the abdomen, urinary tract and ear, were more frequent in patients treated with Prolia®

Endocarditis was also reported more frequently in Prolia®-treated patients. The incidence of opportunistic infections and the overall incidence of infections were similar between the treatment groups. Advise patients to seek prompt medical attention if they develop signs or symptoms of severe infection, including cellulitis. 

Patients on concomitant immunosuppressant agents or with impaired immune systems may be at increased risk for serious infections.  In patients who develop serious infections while on Prolia®, prescribers should assess the need for continued Prolia® therapy.

In the same clinical trial in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, epidermal and dermal adverse events such as dermatitis, eczema and rashes occurred at a significantly higher rate with Prolia® compared to placebo.  Most of these events were not specific to the injection site.  Consider discontinuing Prolia® if severe symptoms develop.

Severe and occasionally incapacitating bone, joint, and/or muscle pain has been reported in patients taking Prolia®.  Consider discontinuing use if severe symptoms develop.

In clinical trials in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, Prolia® resulted in significant suppression of bone remodeling as evidenced by markers of bone turnover and bone histomorphometry. The significance of these findings and the effect of long-term treatment are unknown. Monitor patients for consequences, including ONJ, atypical fractures, and delayed fracture healing.

The most common adverse reactions (>5% and more common than placebo) in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis are back pain, pain in extremity, musculoskeletal pain, hypercholesterolemia, and cystitis.

The most common adverse reactions (> 5% and more common than placebo) in men with osteoporosis are back pain, arthralgia, and nasopharyngitis. Pancreatitis has been reported with Prolia®.

In women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, the overall incidence of new malignancies was 4.3% in the placebo group and 4.8% in the Prolia® groups. In men with osteoporosis, new malignancies were reported in no patients in the placebo group and 4 (3.3%) patients in the Prolia® group. A causal relationship to drug exposure has not been established. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity.

The Prolia Postmarketing Active Safety Surveillance Program is available to collect information from prescribers on specific adverse events.  Please see https://www.proliasafety.com/ or call 1-800-772-6436 for more information.

For more information, please see the Prolia Prescribing Information, and Medication Guide.

About XGEVA® (denosumab)
XGEVA was approved by the FDA in 2010 for the prevention of skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with bone metastases from solid tumors (XGEVA is not indicated for the prevention of SREs in patients with multiple myeloma).

In clinical trials, XGEVA demonstrated a clinically meaningful improvement compared to zoledronic acid (the previous standard of care) in preventing SREs, which were defined as radiation to bone, pathologic fracture, surgery to the bone, and spinal cord compression. XGEVA is administered as a single subcutaneous injection of 120 mg once every 4 weeks.

In 2013, XGEVA was approved by the FDA as the first-and-only treatment for adults and skeletally mature adolescents with giant cell tumor of bone that is unresectable or where surgical resection is likely to result in severe morbidity. XGEVA is administered as a single subcutaneous injection of 120 mg once every 4 weeks with additional 120 mg doses administered on days 8 and 15 of the first month of therapy.

In 2014, XGEVA was approved by the FDA for the treatment of hypercalcemia of malignancy refractory to bisphosphonate therapy. XGEVA is administered as a single subcutaneous injection of 120 mg once every 4 weeks with additional 120 mg doses administered on days 8 and 15 of the first month of therapy.

Important Safety Information

Hypocalcemia
Pre-existing hypocalcemia must be corrected prior to initiating therapy with XGEVA. XGEVA can cause severe symptomatic hypocalcemia, and fatal cases have been reported. Monitor calcium levels, especially in the first weeks of initiating therapy, and administer calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D as necessary. Monitor levels more frequently when XGEVA is administered with other drugs that can also lower calcium levels. Advise patients to contact a healthcare professional for symptoms of hypocalcemia.

An increased risk of hypocalcemia has been observed in clinical trials of patients with increasing renal dysfunction, most commonly with severe dysfunction (creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/minute and/or on dialysis), and with inadequate/no calcium supplementation. Monitor calcium levels and calcium and vitamin D intake.

Hypersensitivity
XGEVA is contraindicated in patients with known clinically significant hypersensitivity to XGEVA,   including anaphylaxis that has been reported with use of XGEVA. If an anaphylactic or other clinically significant allergic reaction occurs, initiate appropriate therapy and discontinue XGEVA therapy permanently. 

Drug Products with Same Active Ingredient
Patients receiving XGEVA should not take Prolia® (denosumab).

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw
Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) has occurred in patients receiving XGEVA, manifesting as jaw pain, osteomyelitis, osteitis, bone erosion, tooth or periodontal infection, toothache, gingival ulceration, or gingival erosion.  Persistent pain or slow healing of the mouth or jaw after dental surgery may also be manifestations of ONJ. In clinical trials in patients with osseous metastasis, the incidence of ONJ was higher with longer duration of exposure. 

Patients with a history of tooth extraction, poor oral hygiene, or use of a dental appliance are at a greater risk to develop ONJ.  Other risk factors for the development of ONJ include immunosuppressive therapy, treatment with angiogenesis inhibitors, systemic corticosteroid, diabetes, and gingival infections.

Perform an oral examination and appropriate preventive dentistry prior to the initiation of XGEVA and periodically during XGEVA therapy. Advise patients regarding oral hygiene practices. Avoid invasive dental procedures during treatment with XGEVA.  Consider temporarily interrupting XGEVA therapy if an invasive dental procedure must be performed.   

Patients who are suspected of having or who develop ONJ while on XGEVA should receive care by a dentist or an oral surgeon.  In these patients, extensive dental surgery to treat ONJ may exacerbate the condition. 

Atypical Subtrochanteric and Diaphyseal Femoral Fracture
Atypical femoral fracture has been reported with XGEVA. These fractures can occur anywhere in the femoral shaft from just below the lesser trochanter to above the supracondylar flare and are transverse or short oblique in orientation without evidence of comminution.

Atypical femoral fractures most commonly occur with minimal or no trauma to the affected area. They may be bilateral and many patients report prodromal pain in the affected area, usually presenting as dull, aching thigh pain, weeks to months before a complete fracture occurs. A number of reports note that patients were also receiving treatment with glucocorticoids (e.g. prednisone) at the time of fracture. During XGEVA treatment, patients should be advised to report new or unusual thigh, hip, or groin pain. Patient presenting with an atypical femur fracture should also be assessed for symptoms and signs of fracture in the contralateral limb. Interruption of XGEVA therapy should be considered, pending a risk/benefit assessment, on an individual basis.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
XGEVA can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Based on findings in animals, XGEVA is expected to result in adverse reproductive effects.  Advise females of reproductive potential to use highly effective contraception during therapy, and for at least five months after the last dose of XGEVA.  Apprise the patient of the potential hazard to a fetus if XGEVA is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while patients are exposed to XGEVA.

Adverse Reactions
The most common adverse reactions in patients receiving XGEVA with bone metastasis from solid tumors were fatigue/asthenia, hypophosphatemia, and nausea. The most common serious adverse reaction was dyspnea.

The most common adverse reactions in patients receiving XGEVA for giant cell tumor of bone were arthralgia, headache, nausea, back pain, fatigue, and pain in extremity. The most common serious adverse reactions were osteonecrosis of the jaw and osteomyelitis. The most common adverse reactions resulting in discontinuation of XGEVA were osteonecrosis of the jaw and tooth abscess or tooth infection.

The most common adverse reactions in patients receiving XGEVA for hypercalcemia of malignancy were nausea, dyspnea, decreased appetite, headache, peripheral edema, vomiting, anemia, constipation, and diarrhea. 

Denosumab is also marketed as Prolia® in other indications.

Please visit www.amgen.com or www.xgeva.com for Full Prescribing Information.

About Vectibix® (panitumumab)
Vectibix is the first fully human anti-EGFR antibody approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Vectibix was approved in the U.S. in September 2006 as a monotherapy for the treatment of patients with EGFR-expressing mCRC after disease progression after prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine-,  oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy.

In May 2014, the FDA approved Vectibix for use in combination with FOLFOX, as first-line treatment in patients with wild-type KRAS (exon 2) mCRC. With this approval, Vectibix became the first-and-only biologic therapy indicated for use with FOLFOX, one of the most commonly used chemotherapy regimens, in the first-line treatment of mCRC for patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC.

Important U.S. Product Information 
Vectibix is indicated for the treatment of patients with wild-type KRAS (exon 2 in codons 12 or 13) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as determined by an FDA-approved test for this use:

  • As first-line therapy in combination with FOLFOX
  • As monotherapy following disease progression after prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy

Limitation of Use: Vectibix is not indicated for the treatment of patients with RAS-mutant mCRC or for whom RAS mutation status is unknown.

WARNING: DERMATOLOGIC TOXICITY 
Dermatologic Toxicity: Dermatologic toxicities occurred in 90 percent of patients and were severe (NCI-CTC grade 3 or higher) in 15% of patients receiving Vectibix® monotherapy.

In Study 1, dermatologic toxicities occurred in 90% of patients and were severe (NCI-CTC grade 3 and higher) in 15% of patients with mCRC receiving Vectibix®. The clinical manifestations included, but were not limited to, acneiform dermatitis, pruritus, erythema, rash, skin exfoliation, paronychia, dry skin, and skin fissures.

Monitor patients who develop dermatologic or soft tissue toxicities while receiving Vectibix® for the development of inflammatory or infectious sequelae. Life-threatening and fatal infectious complications including necrotizing fasciitis, abscesses, and sepsis have been observed in patients treated with Life-threatening and fatal bullous mucocutaneous disease with blisters, erosions, and skin sloughing has also been observed in patients treated with Vectibix®. It could not be determined whether these mucocutaneous adverse reactions were directly related to EGFR inhibition or to idiosyncratic immune-related effects (e.g., Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis). Withhold or discontinue Vectibix® for dermatologic or soft tissue toxicity associated with severe or life-threatening inflammatory or infectious complications. Dose modifications for Vectibix® concerning dermatologic toxicity are provided in the product labeling.

Vectibix® is not indicated for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer that harbor somatic mutations in exon 2 (codons 12 and 13), exon 3 (codons 59 and 61), and exon 4 (codons 117 and 146) of either KRAS or NRAS and hereafter is referred to as "RAS".

Retrospective subset analyses across several randomized clinical trials were conducted to investigate the role of RAS mutations on the clinical effects of anti-EGFR-directed monoclonal antibodies (panitumumab or cetuximab). Anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with tumors containing RAS mutations resulted in exposing those patients to anti-EGFR related adverse reactions without clinical benefit from these agents.

Additionally, in Study 3, 272 patients with RAS-mutant mCRC tumors received Vectibix® in combination with FOLFOX and 276 patients received FOLFOX alone. In an exploratory subgroup analysis, OS was shorter (HR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.01-1.45) in patients with RAS-mutant mCRC who received Vectibix® and FOLFOX versus FOLFOX alone.

Progressively decreasing serum magnesium levels leading to severe (Grade 3-4) hypomagnesemia occurred in up to 7% (in Study 2) of patients across clinical trials. Monitor patients for hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia prior to initiating Vectibix® treatment, periodically during Vectibix® treatment, and for up to 8 weeks after the completion of treatment. Other electrolyte disturbances, including hypokalemia, have also been observed. Replete magnesium and other electrolytes as appropriate.

In Study 1, 4% of patients experienced infusion reactions and 1% of patients experienced severe infusion reactions (NCI-CTC grade 3-4). Infusion reactions, manifesting as fever, chills, dyspnea, bronchospasm, and hypotension, can occur following Vectibix® administration. Fatal infusion reactions occurred in postmarketing experience. Terminate the infusion for severe infusion reactions.

Severe diarrhea and dehydration, leading to acute renal failure and other complications, have been observed in patients treated with Vectibix® in combination with chemotherapy.

Fatal and non-fatal cases of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (1%) and pulmonary fibrosis have been observed in patients treated with Vectibix®. Pulmonary fibrosis occurred in less than 1% (2/1467) of patients enrolled in clinical studies of Vectibix®. In the event of acute onset or worsening of pulmonary symptoms, interrupt Vectibix therapy. Discontinue Vectibix therapy if ILD is confirmed.

In patients with a history of interstitial pneumonitis or pulmonary fibrosis, or evidence of interstitial pneumonitis or pulmonary fibrosis, the benefits of therapy with Vectibix® versus the risk of pulmonary complications must be carefully considered.

Exposure to sunlight can exacerbate dermatologic toxicity. Advise patients to wear sunscreen and hats and limit sun exposure while receiving Vectibix®.

Keratitis and ulcerative keratitis, known risk factors for corneal perforation, have been reported with Vectibix® use. Monitor for evidence of keratitis or ulcerative keratitis. Interrupt or discontinue Vectibix® for acute or worsening keratitis.

In an interim analysis of an open-label, multicenter, randomized clinical trial in the first-line setting in patients with mCRC, the addition of Vectibix® to the combination of bevacizumab and chemotherapy resulted in decreased OS and increased incidence of NCI-CTC grade 3–5 (87% vs 72%) adverse reactions. NCI-CTC grade 3–4 adverse reactions occurring at a higher rate in Vectibix®-treated patients included rash/acneiform dermatitis (26% vs 1%), diarrhea (23% vs 12%), dehydration (16% vs 5%; primarily occurring in patients with diarrhea), hypokalemia (10% vs 4%), stomatitis/mucositis (4% vs < 1%), and hypomagnesemia (4% vs 0).

NCI-CTC grade 3–5 pulmonary embolism occurred at a higher rate in Vectibix®-treated patients (7% vs 3%) and included fatal events in three (< 1%) Vectibix®-treated patients.

As a result of the toxicities experienced, patients randomized to Vectibix®, bevacizumab, and chemotherapy received a lower mean relative dose intensity of each chemotherapeutic agent (oxaliplatin, irinotecan, bolus 5-FU, and/or infusional 5-FU) over the first 24 weeks on study, compared with those randomized to bevacizumab and chemotherapy.

Advise patients of the need for adequate contraception in both males and females while receiving Vectibix® and for 6 months after the last dose of Vectibix® therapy. Vectibix® may be transmitted from the mother to the developing fetus, and has the potential to cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women.

Because many drugs are excreted into human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Vectibix®, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. If nursing is interrupted, it should not be resumed earlier than 2 months following the last dose of Vectibix®.

Women who become pregnant during Vectibix® treatment are encouraged to enroll in Amgen's Pregnancy Surveillance Program. Women who are nursing during Vectibix® treatment are encouraged to enroll in Amgen's Lactation Surveillance Program. Patients or their physicians should call 1-800-77-AMGEN (1-800-772-6436) to enroll.

In Study 1, the most common adverse reactions (≥ 20%) with Vectibix® were skin rash with variable presentations, paronychia, fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea. The most common (> 5%) serious adverse reactions in the Vectibix® arm were general physical health deterioration and intestinal obstruction.

In Study 3, the most commonly reported adverse reactions (≥ 20%) in patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC receiving Vectibix® (6 mg/kg every 2 weeks) and FOLFOX therapy (N = 322) were diarrhea, stomatitis, mucosal inflammation, asthenia, paronychia, anorexia, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, rash, acneiform dermatitis, pruritus, and dry skin. Serious adverse reactions (≥ 2% difference between treatment arms) in Vectibix®-treated patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC were diarrhea and dehydration.

To see the Vectibix® Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning visit www.vectibix.com.

About Amgen
Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and understand the fundamentals of human biology.

Amgen focuses on areas of high unmet medical need and leverages its biologics manufacturing expertise to strive for solutions that improve health outcomes and dramatically improve people's lives. A biotechnology pioneer since 1980, Amgen has grown to be one of the world's leading independent biotechnology companies, has reached millions of patients around the world and is developing a pipeline of medicines with breakaway potential. 

For more information, visit www.amgen.com and follow us on www.twitter.com/amgen.

Forward Looking Statements
This news release contains forward-looking statements that are based on the current expectations and beliefs of Amgen Inc. and its subsidiaries (Amgen) and are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including estimates of revenues, operating margins, capital expenditures, cash, other financial metrics, expected legal, arbitration, political, regulatory or clinical results or practices, customer and prescriber patterns or practices, reimbursement activities and outcomes and other such estimates and results. Forward-looking statements involve significant risks and uncertainties, including those discussed below and more fully described in the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) reports filed by Amgen Inc., including Amgen Inc.'s most recent annual report on Form 10-K and any subsequent periodic reports on Form 10-Q and Form 8-K. Please refer to Amgen Inc.'s most recent Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K for additional information on the uncertainties and risk factors related to Amgen's business. Unless otherwise noted, Amgen is providing this information as of Dec. 14, 2015, and expressly disclaims any duty to update information contained in this news release.

No forward-looking statement can be guaranteed and actual results may differ materially from those Amgen projects. Discovery or identification of new product candidates or development of new indications for existing products cannot be guaranteed and movement from concept to product is uncertain; consequently, there can be no guarantee that any particular product candidate or development of a new indication for an existing product will be successful and become a commercial product. Further, preclinical results do not guarantee safe and effective performance of product candidates in humans. The complexity of the human body cannot be perfectly, or sometimes, even adequately modeled by computer or cell culture systems or animal models. The length of time that it takes for Amgen and its partners to complete clinical trials and obtain regulatory approval for product marketing has in the past varied and Amgen expects similar variability in the future. Amgen develops product candidates internally and through licensing collaborations, partnerships and joint ventures. Product candidates that are derived from relationships may be subject to disputes between the parties or may prove to be not as effective or as safe as Amgen may have believed at the time of entering into such relationship. Also, Amgen or others could identify safety, side effects or manufacturing problems with Amgen's products after they are on the market. Amgen's business may be impacted by government investigations, litigation and product liability claims. If Amgen fails to meet the compliance obligations in the corporate integrity agreement between Amgen and the U.S. government, Amgen could become subject to significant sanctions. Amgen depends on third parties for a significant portion of its manufacturing capacity for the supply of certain of its current and future products and limits on supply may constrain sales of certain of its current products and product candidate development.

In addition, sales of Amgen's products are affected by the reimbursement policies imposed by third-party payers, including governments, private insurance plans and managed care providers and may be affected by regulatory, clinical and guideline developments and domestic and international trends toward managed care and healthcare cost containment as well as U.S. legislation affecting pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement. Government and others' regulations and reimbursement policies may affect the development, usage and pricing of Amgen's products. In addition, Amgen competes with other companies with respect to some of its marketed products as well as for the discovery and development of new products. Amgen believes that some of its newer products, product candidates or new indications for existing products, may face competition when and as they are approved and marketed. Amgen's products may compete against products that have lower prices, established reimbursement, superior performance, are easier to administer, or that are otherwise competitive with its products. In addition, while Amgen and its partners routinely obtain patents for their products and technology, the protection of Amgen's products offered by patents and patent applications may be challenged, invalidated or circumvented by its competitors and there can be no guarantee of Amgen's or its partners' ability to obtain or maintain patent protection for Amgen's products or product candidates. Amgen cannot guarantee that it will be able to produce commercially successful products or maintain the commercial success of its existing products. Amgen's stock price may be affected by actual or perceived market opportunity, competitive position and success or failure of its products or product candidates. Further, the discovery of significant problems with a product similar to one of Amgen's products that implicate an entire class of products could have a material adverse effect on sales of the affected products and on Amgen's business and results of operations. Amgen's efforts to integrate the operations of companies it has acquired may not be successful. Amgen may experience difficulties, delays or unexpected costs and not achieve anticipated cost savings from its ongoing restructuring plan. Amgen's business performance could affect or limit the ability of Amgen's Board of Directors to declare a dividend or their ability to pay a dividend or repurchase Amgen common stock.

CONTACT: Amgen, Thousand Oaks
Kristen Davis, 805-447-3008 (media)
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