CareerBuilder Study Explores the Ongoing Plight of the Long-term Unemployed

- One in four have not had enough money for food; one in ten have lost their homes

- 11 percent relying on parents for income

- 30 percent haven't been on any job interviews in the last 12 months

- Nearly half said their skills have depreciated

Jan 23, 2014, 05:00 ET from CareerBuilder

CHICAGO, Jan. 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- While the job market is showing signs of improvement, one segment of the workforce is feeling the sting of a slower-than-expected recovery more so than others: the long-term unemployed.  Thirty percent of workers who were previously employed full time and who have been out of work for 12 months or longer said they haven't had a single job interview since they became unemployed.  A number of these workers reported losing their homes, struggling to feed their families and having to turn to their parents to supplement income. 

The national study from CareerBuilder takes a closer look at the challenges the long-term unemployed are up against and how they are overcoming them.  The survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from November 6 to December 2, 2013, and included a sample of more than 300 workers who were previously employed full-time, have been unemployed for 12 months or longer and are currently looking for a job.

"There are many talented people in the U.S. who are having a tough time finding a job – not because of a lack of ability, but because of ongoing challenges in the economy," said Rosemary Haefner, Vice President of Human Resources at CareerBuilder.  "While our study explores the struggles they are facing, it also brings to light the resilience of these workers who remain optimistic, look for jobs every day and take measures to learn new skill sets to open the doors to new opportunities."

Effects of Long-term Unemployment
The loss of a regular income has affected the long-term unemployed in various ways from accelerated credit debt to downsizing to tense relationships:   

  • Not having enough money for food – 25 percent
  • Strained relationships with family and friends – 25 percent
  • Maxed out credit cards to pay other bills – 12 percent
  • Losing their house or apartment due to the inability to pay the mortgage or rent – 10 percent
  • Moving back in with their parents – 9 percent (Among long-term unemployed ages 35 to 54, 13 percent moved back in with their parents)
  • Moving to a less expensive location – 4 percent

Current Source of Income
Many long-term unemployed said they are relying on their significant other, personal savings or family members to help out with expenses:

  • Spouse or partner – 39 percent
  • Savings – 31 percent
  • Side jobs – 12 percent
  • Parents – 11 percent
  • Borrowing from family and friends – 9 percent

Biggest Challenges in Finding Employment
Forty-four percent of the long-term unemployed said they look for jobs every day; 43 percent look every week.  While three in ten long-term unemployed said they haven't had any interviews since they lost their jobs (30 percent), the same number (30 percent) said they have had five or more interviews; 14 percent have had ten or more.  One in ten have turned down a job while unemployed.

Being out of the workforce for an extended period has left nearly half (45 percent) of long-term unemployed concerned that their skills have depreciated.  Of these respondents, more than half (56 percent) said their technology skills depreciated.   

When asked to identify some of the major challenges they encounter when looking for a job, the long-term unemployed pointed to:

  • My age or experience is a disadvantage – 66 percent (Among long-term unemployed ages 55 and older, 92 percent feel their age works against them)
  • The longer I am unemployed, employers are becoming less responsive – 63 percent
  • The number of jobs in my profession has dropped significantly during and post-recession – 37 percent
  • I am unable to relocate or commute far – 30 percent
  • I am having difficulty transitioning skills to a new field or industry – 16 percent

Building New Skill Sets
Despite these challenges, the long-term unemployed remain hopeful and provided the following examples of how they are keeping active and learning new skills: 

  • Expanded my professional network online and offline – 20 percent
  • Volunteered – 20 percent
  • Signed up with a staffing firm/recruiter – 18 percent
  • Took on part-time work – 14 percent
  • Took a class – 12 percent
  • Went back to school full-time – 5 percent

Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Interactive© on behalf of CareerBuilder among 310 long-term unemployed (previously full-time employed workers who have been unemployed for 12 months or longer but are currently looking for work) ages 18 and over between November 6 and December 2, 2013 (percentages for some questions are based on a subset, based on their responses to certain questions). With a pure probability sample of 310, one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results have a sampling error of +/- 5.57 percentage points.  Sampling error for data from sub-samples is higher and varies.

About CareerBuilder®
CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world's top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions.  Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE: GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE: MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit www.careerbuilder.com.

Media Contact
Jennifer Grasz  
773-527-1164
jennifer.grasz@careerbuilder.com
http://www.twitter.com/CareerBuilderPR

SOURCE CareerBuilder

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