PR Newswire: news distribution, targeting and monitoring
2014

Children with ACL Injuries Require Special Treatment, Care to Avoid Future Knee Injuries and Complications

Share with Twitter Share with LinkedIn

ACL injuries on the rise in younger patients

ROSEMONT, Ill., Feb. 6, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Until a child's bones have fully matured (in girls, typically by age 14; in boys, age 16), an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)—the primary, stabilizing ligament of the knee joint—requires special consideration, treatment and care to ensure appropriate healing and to prevent long-term complications.

According to a review article in the February 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), ACL injuries once were considered rare in children and adolescents. However, the number of ACL injuries in young athletes is on the rise, "whether they result from year-round training, less free play or increased single sport concentration," said lead study author and pediatric orthopaedic surgeon Jeremy Frank, MD, with Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital's Department of Pediatric Orthopaedics and [U18] Sports Medicine in Hollywood, Fla.

To avoid potential future complications, such as early onset osteoarthritis, the literature review outlines the optimal strategies for treating pediatric ACL injuries based on the specifics of the injury and the child's skeletal (bone), age and developmental maturity.

Among the recommendations:

  • Children should be treated by an orthopaedic surgeon who has expertise in the operative treatment of pediatric ACL injuries.
  • For pediatric and adolescent patients with partial ACL tears compromising less than 50 percent of the diameter of the ligament, non-surgical management, including activity modification, bracing and/or physical therapy, can be considered.
  • Treatment for complete ACL ruptures typically involves transphyseal ACL reconstruction surgery that partially or completely spares the femoral physis (the growth plate, contributing to 70 percent of thigh-bone growth), and adult-type surgical or arthroscopic reconstruction in adolescents at or nearing skeletal maturity.
  • Postoperative management may include weight-bearing and activity modifications, bracing, and a progressive physical therapy program emphasizing range of motion (ROM), closed-chain strengthening (exercises on the knee while the foot remains stationary) and a gradual and measured return to sport-specific maneuvers and activities.

"There are currently numerous safe and effective surgical techniques to reconstruct the ACL in the skeletally immature sportsperson to restore stability and forestall the early progression towards meniscal and chondral (cartilage) pathologies (disease)," said Dr. Frank. Complications from ACL surgery are rare in children when the appropriate operation is performed on the right patient.

Read about how Noah Korotzer, Christina Gordon, Anthony Risaliti and Samuel Wittwer  overcame their pediatric, sports-related ACL rupture injuries on ANationInMotion.org.

Study Abstract

February 1, 2013 Full JAAOS Table of Contents

  • Correspondence: Benign Tumors of the Spine
  • Worker's Compensation and Outcomes of Upper Extremity Surgery
  • ACL Injuries in the Skeletally immature Athlete: Diagnosis and Treatment
  • Fracture Dislocations of the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint
  • Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Spine Venous Thrombosis in Athletes
  • Venour Thrombosis in Athletes
  • Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

For more AAOS News, visit the News Bureau
Follow AAOS on Twitter 
Follow AAOS on Facebook

A Nation in Motion
More than one in four Americans have bone or joint health problems, making them the greatest cause of lost work days in the U.S. When orthopaedic surgeons restore mobility and reduce pain, they help people get back to work and to independent, productive lives. Orthopaedic surgeons provide the best value in American medicine in both human and economic terms and access to high-quality orthopaedic care keeps this "Nation in Motion." To learn more, to read hundreds of patient stories or to submit your own story, visit anationinmotion.org.

More information about the AAOS
More information about STOP Sports Injury Prevention program

SOURCE American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons



RELATED LINKS
http://www.aaos.org

Featured Video

Journalists and Bloggers

Visit PR Newswire for Journalists for releases, photos, ProfNet experts, and customized feeds just for Media.

View and download archived video content distributed by MultiVu on The Digital Center.

Share with Twitter Share with LinkedIn
 

Custom Packages

Browse our custom packages or build your own to meet your unique communications needs.

Start today.

 

 
 

PR Newswire Membership

Fill out a PR Newswire membership form or contact us at (888) 776-0942.

 
 

Learn about PR Newswire services

Request more information about PR Newswire products and services or call us at (888) 776-0942.

 
Area to test

Online Member Center

Not a Member?
Click Here to Join
Login
Search News Releases
Advanced Search
Search
  1. PR Newswire Services
  2. Knowledge Center
  3. Browse News Releases
  4. Contact PR Newswire
  5. Send a News Release