Doyle New York to Auction a Chinese Imperial Zitan Table on September 13, 2010

Aug 30, 2010, 17:14 ET from Doyle New York

NEW YORK, Aug. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Doyle New York, one of the world's leading auctioneers and appraisers, will hold an auction of Asian Works of Art on Monday, September 13 at 10am (EDT). The sale offers over 430 lots showcasing the arts of China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia dating from the Neolithic Period through the 20th century. Offerings include porcelain, pottery, jade, ivories, scholar's objects, bronzes, swords, textiles, screens and paintings. The exhibition will be on view from September 10 through 12. Doyle New York is located at 175 East 87th Street in New York City.

Highlighting the auction is an 18th century Chinese Imperial zitan side table from the Estates of Walter and Sonja Caron Stein of Long Island, New York. Estimated at $500,000-700,000 USD, this exquisitely carved table, or changzhuo, is crafted of rare zitan wood -- a commodity so expensive and highly-prized that existing stores of it were safeguarded in the Imperial warehouse and restricted for use by the Imperial Palace Workshop. An Imperial provenance is also suggested by the table's carved borders of five-clawed dragons, a symbol of the Emperor. The table is additionally decorated with borders of bats, representing happiness.

"Early Chinese furniture of zitan wood is highly sought-after, because of its rarity and its Imperial connections," said Marley Rabstenek, Doyle New York's specialist in charge of the sale. "A table such as this is certain to generate excitement among the world's most important collectors."

Chinese porcelains in the auction are highlighted by a blue and white glazed Meiping bearing the Qianlong Seal Mark and of the Period (1736-1795). In a private collection since the 1950s, the Meiping measures 9.75 inches in height and is estimated at $150,000-200,000 USD. Exceptional artistic and technical talent is evidenced in this piece, reflecting the precision of the craftsmen who worked the Imperial kilns during the Qianlong Period, most likely under the watchful eye of Tang Yin who supervised Imperial kilns during the Yongzheng and Qianlong Periods.

The selection of Chinese jades in the sale features a Qing Dynasty white jade diminutive pouring vessel decorated with a carved bat and estimated at $30,000-50,000 USD.

The fully-illustrated auction catalogue may be viewed online at http://www.doylenewyork.com. For information, bidders may call 212-427-2730 or email asian@DoyleNewYork.com.

SOURCE Doyle New York



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