Eastern State Penitentiary Commemorates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Readings of "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Jan 07, 2016, 12:20 ET from Eastern State Penitentiary

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 7, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Saturday, January 16 through Monday, January 18, 2016, Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site commemorates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his 1963 "Letter from Birmingham Jail" with special readings from the landmark text, and opportunities for visitors to respond to its relevance in light of recent clashes between civil rights protesters and police.

Readings of the Letter

Professional actors read excerpts from King's letter three times a day on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday at 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m., and 3:30 p.m. An informal Q&A moderated by a civil rights scholar follows each reading, giving visitors an opportunity to respond to the letter's relevance today. The readings are free and open to the public. Free tickets are required and available online at easternstate.org/events or at the door, subject to availability.

Family Activities

In partnership with Art Sanctuary, children ages 7-12 and their families can create art in response to themes found in the letter, and read stories about Dr. King's life and legacy. Family activities are available from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day, free and open to the public. No reservations required.

"Dr. King's extraordinary letter has never been more relevant than in 2016," says Sean Kelley, Director of Interpretation and Public Programming for Eastern State Penitentiary. "Dr. King taught us that civil disobedience was essential to the civil rights movement. When this highly educated and prominent man chose to spend time in jails, it forced many Americans to confront not just the racism of individual behavior, but the immortality and oppression in the nation's legal system as well. We look forward to an open and frank discussion about Dr. King's actions in light of the ongoing controversy around our nation."

About "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama on April 12, 1963 for demonstrating without a permit. During his 11 days in jail there, he wrote "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in response to a letter published by Alabama clergymen that criticized King's use of jail time to demonstrate civil injustice.

In the letter, Dr. King explains why he chose to use prisons as a tool in his civil rights movement. He writes, "I submit that an individual who breaks the law that conscience tells him is unjust, and willingly accepts the penalty by staying in jail in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the very highest respect for the law."

The writing of the letter itself involved rule breaking. Prisoners were not allowed instruments to write during this time, so Dr. King's lawyer snuck in a pencil. The letter was written in the margins of a newspaper and smuggled back out by the same lawyer. The letter became a manifesto for civil disobedience, stating, "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice anywhere." The letter led to a pivotal moment in the American civil rights movement when, about a month after it was published, Birmingham officials agreed to desegregate schools, restaurants, and stores.

About Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site

Eastern State Penitentiary was once the most famous and expensive prison in the world, but stands today in ruin, a haunting world of crumbling cellblocks and empty guard towers. Known for its grand architecture and strict discipline, this was the world's first true "penitentiary," a prison designed to inspire penitence, or true regret, in the hearts of convicts. Its vaulted, sky-lit cells once held many of America's most notorious criminals, including bank robber "Slick Willie" Sutton and Al Capone.

Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site is located at 22nd Street and Fairmount Avenue, just five blocks from the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The penitentiary is open seven days a week, year round. Admission is $14 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $10 for students and children ages 7-12. (Not recommended for children under the age of seven.) Tickets are available online at easternstate.org or at the door, subject to availability. Admission includes "The Voices of Eastern State" Audio Tour, narrated by actor Steve Buscemi; Hands-On History interactive experiences; history exhibits; and a critically acclaimed series of artist installations.

For more information and schedules, the public should call (215) 236-3300 or visit www.EasternState.org.

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160107/320052 

 

SOURCE Eastern State Penitentiary



RELATED LINKS

http://www.EasternState.org