2014

For Youth Sexting: Public Supports Education, Not Criminal Charges

New National Poll on Children's Health report measures public opinion about legislation addressing teens who send sexually explicit text messages

ANN ARBOR, Mich., March 20, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Sexting – sending sexually explicit, nude, or semi-nude photos by cell phone – has become a national concern, especially when it involves children and teens. A new poll shows that the vast majority of adults do not support legal consequences for teens who sext.

Seventeen states have already enacted laws to address youth sexting and another 13 states have pending legislation in 2012 that focuses on sexting.  

The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health recently asked adults across the United States for their opinions about youth sexting and sexting legislation.

The poll found that the vast majority, 81 percent, of adults think an educational program or counseling is an appropriate consequence for teens who sext. Most adults also favor similar non-criminal programs: 76 percent of adults think schools should give all students and parents information on sexting, and 75 percent of adults support requiring community service for sexting teens.

In contrast, most adults do not favor legal consequences for minors who sext other minors. About one-half, 44 percent, support fines less than $500 for youth sexting, while 20 percent or fewer think that sexting should be treated as a sex crime, or that teens who sext should be prosecuted under sexual abuse laws.

"As youth sexting has become more of a national concern, many states have acted to address the issue. However, before this poll, very little was known about what the public thinks about sexting legislation," says Matthew M. Davis M.D., M.A.P.P., Director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, Associate Professor in the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit at the U-M Medical School, and Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

"This poll indicates that, while many adults are concerned about sexting among children and teenagers, they strongly favor educational programs, counseling, and community service rather than penalties through the legal system," says Davis.

The poll also asked adults who they think should play a role in addressing the problem of youth sexting. Almost all adults, 93 percent, believe parents should have a major role. Many adults also believe that teens themselves, 71 percent, and schools,52 percent, should have a major role in addressing youth sexting.

"Across the country, the public supports requiring schools to distribute information about sexting to students and parents. Since adults strongly feel that parents should play a major role in addressing sexting, this is a great opportunity for parents and schools to work together on this issue," says Davis. "Child advocacy organizations could assist in this effort by developing clear educational information that is appropriate for students of different ages."

Full report: http://www.mottnpch.org/reports-surveys/youth-sexting-public-supports-education-not-criminal-charges

C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health:

Website: Check out the Poll's new website: MottNPCH.org. You can search and browse over 60 NPCH Reports, suggest topics for future polls, share your opinion in a quick poll, and view information on popular topics. The National Poll on Children's Health team welcomes feedback on the new website, including features you'd like to see added. To share feedback, e-mail NPCH@med.umich.edu.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mottnpch

Twitter: @MottNPCH

Additional resources:

National Crime Prevention Council: Sexting: How Parents Can Keep their Kids Safe (.pdf)

Cyberbullying Research Center: Sexting: A Brief Guide for Educators and Parents (.pdf)

ConnectSafely.org: Tips to Prevent Sexting

Education.com: Is Your Child Sexting? What Parents Need to Know

Purpose/Funding: The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health – based at the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit at the University of Michigan and funded by the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and the University of Michigan Health System – is designed to measure major health care issues and trends for U.S. children.

Data Source: This report presents findings from a nationally representative household survey conducted exclusively by Knowledge Networks, Inc. (KN), for C.S. Mott Children's Hospital via a method used in many published studies.  The survey was administered in January 2012 to a randomly selected, stratified group of adults age 18 or older (n=2,131), from the KN standing panel that closely resembles the U.S. population. The sample was subsequently weighted to reflect population figures from the Census Bureau. The survey completion rate was 60 percent among panel members contacted to participate. The margin of error is +/- 2 to 4 percentage points.

To learn more about Knowledge Networks, visit www.knowledgenetworks.com.

Findings from the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health do not represent the opinions of the investigators or the opinions of the University of Michigan. 

 

SOURCE University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health



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