2014

Governor Corbett Announces $79 Million Investment in Water Infrastructure Projects in 16 Counties

HARRISBURG, Pa., Oct. 23, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Governor Tom Corbett today announced the investment of $79 million in 27 non-point source, drinking water, and wastewater projects in 16 counties through the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST). 

"Today's funding approvals bring PENNVEST's total assistance over its 24 year history past the $7 billion mark, a landmark achievement for this program and for the state as a whole," Corbett said. "I am fully committed to continuing and expanding this effort to bring clean water and sustainable jobs to the citizens of Pennsylvania, both now and in the future."

Also notable is that this was the first Board of Directors meeting for five new governor appointees to the board: William Sasso (Chair), M. Joel Bolstein, Donald Gennuso, Bruce Hottle and Jan Rea.  This was also the last board meeting for Representative Camille ("Bud") George, who has served on the Board since its inception in 1988. 

Of the $79 million total awards, $69 million is for low-interest loans and $10 million is offered as grants.

The awards range from a $100,287 loan to construct waste handling facilities that will reduce nutrient runoff into a stream in Chester County, to a $12.8 million loan/grant combination for a project in Blair County that will both reduce nutrient discharges to the Chesapeake Bay as well as eliminate the use of malfunctioning on-lot septic systems that are contaminating local drinking water wells.

The funding comes from a combination of state funds approved by voters, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for the projects are disbursed after bills for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST.

For more information, visit www.pennvest.state.pa.us or call 717-783-6798.

Media contact:  Paul Marchetti, 717-783-4496

Editor's Note: A list of project summaries follows:

PENNVEST Non-Point Source Projects:

Allegheny County
Pittsburgh received a $558,682 loan and a $58,858 grant to work with the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy to install various storm water control measures, including the vegetation berms and the planting of new trees, in the Panther Hollow watershed area of Schenley Park.

Blair County
Blair County Conservation District received two funding awards for projects in Mill Hill Farms:

  • A $366,993 loan to construct manure-handling facilities to reduce the risk of nutrient run-off into Clover Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.
  • A $318,506 loan to construct a manure storage tank and related improvements at an existing heifer facility on the farm to reduce nutrient run-off into Clover Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.

Bucks County
Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission received two funding awards for projects in this county:

  • A $549,761 loan and a $57,918 grant to plant more than 1,000 trees at various sites in Bristol Township to reduce storm water runoff that is causing erosion and sediment flow into the Mill Creek watershed, Neshaminy Creek and the Delaware River.
  • A $284,516 loan and a $29,974 grant to plant 500 trees at various sites in the Borough of Sellersville to reduce storm water runoff that is causing erosion and sediment flow into Perkiomen Creek and the Delaware River.

Chester County

  • Chester County Conservation District received four funding awards for projects in this county:
    • A $95,572 loan and a $22,509 grant to construct various storm water management facilities to reduce sediment runoff into Tweed Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.
    • A $100,287 loan to construct waste handling facilities on the DiFrancesco  mushroom farm to reduce nutrient and sediment flow into Egypt Run, a tributary of the Christina River that flows into the Delaware Bay.
    • A $186,095 loan to construct waste handling facilities on the Hillendale  mushroom farm to reduce nutrient and sediment flow into Red Clay Creek,  tributary of the Delaware Bay.
    • A $1,522,052 loan to upgrade an existing animal mortality composting facility to reduce the potential for sediment and nutrient runoff into the west branch of Brandywine Creek and the Christina River.
  • Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission received a $154,188 loan to plant 174 trees at various sites in the Borough of South Coatesville to reduce storm water runoff that is causing erosion and sediment flow into Brandywine Creek and the Delaware River.

Delaware County
Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission received two funding awards for projects in this county:

  • A $368,846 loan and a $38,858 grant to plant 574 trees at various sites in the City of Chester to reduce storm water runoff that is causing erosion and sediment flow into Chester and Ridley Creeks, tributaries of the Delaware River.
  • A $212,310 loan and a $22,367 grant to plant more than 300 trees at various sites in the Borough of Collingdale to reduce storm water runoff that is causing erosion and sediment flow into Darby Creek, a tributary of the Delaware River.

Lancaster County
Lancaster County Conservation District received a $213,590 loan and a $50,304 grant to upgrade an existing animal mortality composting facility to reduce nutrient runoff into Donegal Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.

PENNVEST Drinking Water Projects:

Adams County
East Berlin Area Joint Authority received a $1,600,000 loan to upgrade its existing treatment and distribution system to meet regulatory requirements and provide safe and reliable drinking water for its customers.

Cambria County
Cresson Township Municipal Authority received a $602,321 loan and a $897,679 grant to install more than three miles of drinking water distribution lines to serve households in the Village of Munster whose wells are contaminated with coliform bacteria and, in some cases, e-coli bacteria.

Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill counties
Hazelton City Authority received a $6,501,292 grant to replace more than five miles of old, deteriorated distribution lines in order to eliminate frequent water outages and to improve fire safety as well as water quality for the authority's customers.

Wayne County
South Wayne County Water and Sewer Authority received a $9,862,181 loan to replace almost twenty miles of deteriorated water mains that suffer numerous breaks and very high water losses, which cause water outages and rationing for the authority's customers.

Westmoreland County
Ligonier Township Municipal Authority received a $3,050,000 loan to construct more than eleven miles of water distribution lines to eliminate the use of contaminated drinking water wells in the Darlington Road area of the Township.

PENNVEST Wastewater Projects:

Adams County
Littlestown Borough Authority received an $8,500,000 loan to upgrade the authority's existing treatment plant to reduce nutrient discharges to Alloway Creek, which is a warm water fishery and a tributary to the Chesapeake Bay.

Allegheny County
West Homestead Borough received a $3,100,000 loan to upgrade more than two miles of sanitary and combined sewers in order eliminate the wet weather discharge of inadequately treated waste into the Monongahela River.

Blair County
Williamsburg Municipal Authority received an $11,189,406 loan and a $1,622,088 grant to upgrade the authority's treatment plant and install six miles of new sewage collection lines, all of which will reduce the discharge of nutrients into the Chesapeake Bay and eliminate the use of malfunctioning on-lot septic systems that are contaminating local drinking water wells.

Clarion County
Washington Township Municipal Authority received a $1,780,634 loan and a $419,366 grant to construct a new wastewater treatment plant in order to eliminate raw sewage discharges into East Sandy Creek during wet weather.

Fayette County
Uniontown City received a $500,000 loan to rehabilitate the City's wastewater collection and treatment system in order to eliminate overloading of the Greater Uniontown treatment plant and the wet weather bypasses of partially treated sewage into Redstone Creek during wet weather.

Lackawanna County
Abington Regional Waste Water Authority received a $9,735,970 loan to upgrade and expand the authority's treatment plant and collection system to eliminate the discharge of untreated wastewater into Leggett's Creek during wet weather.

Luzerne County
West Pittston Borough received a $1,650,000 loan to construct facilities to separate the borough's storm sewers from its sanitary sewer system, eliminating the wet weather discharges of raw sewage into basements, streets and the Susquehanna River.

Wayne County
South Wayne County Water and Sewer Authority received a $10 million loan to install almost twenty miles of new sewage collection lines in order to eliminate the discharge of inadequately treated waste into publicly accessible areas during wet weather.

Westmoreland County
Manor Borough received a $2,660,000 loan to replace both sanitary and storm sewer lines to eliminate the wet weather discharge of inadequately treated sewage into Brush Creek.

SOURCE PENNVEST



RELATED LINKS
http://www.pennvest.state.pa.us

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