Hispanics In New Hispanic Areas Experienced Higher Rates Of Violent Victimization Compared To Other Areas Young Hispanics accounted for the higher rates of violent victimization in new Hispanic areas

WASHINGTON, Aug. 14, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- From 2007 to 2010, Hispanics experienced higher rates of violent victimization in new Hispanic metropolitan areas (26 per 1,000) than in other areas (16 to 20 per 1,000), the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. The difference was primarily due to higher rates of violent victimization of younger Hispanics in these new areas.  

Areas were classified as either established slow-growth, established fast-growth, new, or small Hispanic areas based on their historical Hispanic population and the Hispanic population growth between 1980 and 2010. Established Hispanic areas were metropolitan areas or counties in which the Hispanic base population exceeded the national average of 6.4 percent. These areas were further classified by whether the growth in the Hispanic population was greater or less than the national average growth rate.

Small Hispanic areas were those in which the Hispanic base population and growth rate were both lower than the national average. New Hispanic areas began with a small, lower than average percentage of Hispanics, but the growth in their Hispanic population exceeded the national average.

From 1980 to 2010, the Hispanic population in the United States increased 246 percent, compared to 44 percent for blacks and 9 percent for whites. When all racial and ethnic groups were combined, rates of violent victimization from 2007 to 2010 were lower in new Hispanic areas than in small Hispanic areas.

Between 2007 and 2010—

  • Hispanics ages 18 to 34 exhibited the largest variation in victimization rates by type of area. Those in new Hispanic areas experienced violence at higher rates than those in established and small Hispanic areas.
  • Among all age groups, new Hispanic areas did not show statistically significant higher rates of violent victimization for white and black residents.
  • Blacks experienced higher rates of violent victimization in small Hispanic metropolitan areas (50 per 1,000) than in new Hispanic areas (27 per 1,000).
  • For whites, the overall rate of violent victimization was lower in established slow-growth areas, while other areas showed no significant differences in the overall rate of violent victimization.

Victimization rates in these Hispanic areas from 2007 to 2010 are based on BJS's National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which measures nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police. Violent crime includes rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated and simple assault.

The report, Violent Victimization in New and Established Hispanic Areas, 2007-2010 (NCJ 246311), was written by Min Xie, Ph.D., University of Maryland at College Park, and Michael Planty, BJS. The report, related documents, and additional information about the Bureau of Justice Statistics' statistical publications and programs can be found on the BJS website at http://www.bjs.gov/.

The Office of Justice Programs (OJP), headed by Assistant Attorney General Karol V. Mason, provides federal leadership in developing the nation's capacity to prevent and control crime, administer justice, and assist victims. OJP has six components: the Bureau of Justice Assistance; the Bureau of Justice Statistics; the National Institute of Justice; the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; the Office for Victims of Crime; and the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking. More information about OJP can be found at http://www.ojp.gov.

SOURCE Bureau of Justice Statistics



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