Is Celebrity Copycat Surgery on the Rise? Beverly Hills Physicians believes that beauty inspirations can flesh out a patient's desires, but lookalike surgery can cross the line

LOS ANGELES, April 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Liposuction to replicate Ryan Gosling's six-pack. A tummy tuck and arm lift to emulate Michelle Obama's toned physique. A Pamela Anderson-inspired breast augmentation; Beverly Hills Physicians, leading medical network of plastic surgeons in California, has seen it all. On the one hand, the tendency to want to emulate the appearance of the world's most famously attractive people is only natural; on the other hand, trying to become someone other than yourself is almost never a healthy impulse. In the opinion of Beverly Hills Physicians, there is an enormous difference between being inspired by someone's appearance and trying to duplicate their appearance in every detail.

The most recent case of "copycat" surgery making headlines was a woman in Texas who spent $25,000 to resemble Jennifer Lawrence through liposuction, rhinoplasty, fat grafts, and breast augmentation. Similarly, at the end of last year, a man spent over $100,000 to look like Justin Bieber despite the fact that he was roughly 14 years older than the teen fave. The medical team at Beverly Hills Physicians finds this sort of phenomenon a cause for some concern, but also a source of interest. On one hand, it's impossible to become a true lookalike of any person, famous or not, even if it were a good idea. On the other hand, any person whose appearance we admire, including a celebrity can help us to understand what we're trying to achieve with our own appearance, and also to explain it to our physician.

During a consultation with a board certified BHP surgeon, a prospective patient will frequently bring up a certain famous person as a reference point. Wanting a Jennifer Lopez-inspired derriere or something similar to Angelina Jolie's famously full lips doesn't often mean that a patient wants to emulate a superstars' look exactly; it's just a way of thinking about the changes they would like to make on themselves. Of course, not every idea in a situation like this is workable. In many cases, a BHP doctor might suggest going in an entirely different direction if an idea is unworkable or unwise – it's very much a case-by-case decision.

Fortunately, patients seeking surgery with BHP to try and look exactly like a particular celebrity is a rare occurrence. The fact of the matter is that wanting to duplicate a celebrity's appearance in every detail often doesn't come from the healthiest mental perspective. If this is the case, and not simply a case of enhancing a patient's natural beauty, then the BHP surgeon will often decline operating on that person.

Now, is celebrity copycat surgery actually on the rise? That would be difficult to say for sure. The MTV show "I Want a Famous Face" aired about 10 years ago, so the trend was popular enough then to sustain a series, and a sequel series could almost certainly be shot today. What is different today is that more and more people, famous or otherwise, speak candidly about plastic surgery today, making it a more accepted life choice. This increased dialogue teaches us about the limits of plastic surgery, allowing patients to make more informed decisions about their appearances and health.

If celebrity features inspire you or you simply want to improve on your own features in your own unique way, then visit Beverly Hills Physicians for a free consultation. Call 800-788-1416 to speak with a BHP representative today or visit www.beverlyhillsphysicians.com.

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SOURCE Beverly Hills Physicians



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