Khojali Massacre Documentary "Endless Corridor" Premieres in Stockholm

Feb 19, 2016, 04:21 ET from TEAS

STOCKHOLM, February 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ --

Prominent politicians, journalists and dignitaries on Thursday gathered at the renowned Zita theatre in Stockholm for the premiere screening of the documentary 'Endless Corridor', a film - narrated by Academy Award winning British actor Jeremy Irons - examining the events surrounding the Khojali massacre, in which 613 men, women and children were killed on 25-26 February 1992.

The screening, organised within the Justice for Khojali campaign, was attended by the documentary's Lithuanian Producer/Director Aleksandras Brokas, who worked nearly five years on the documentary.

Brokas told the audience that he worked with film professionals from 15 countries on the project in order to provide an independent point of view for the situation in the region. "The way to freedom and independence is very similar in all post-Soviet countries: it costs a lot," he said. "The tragedy of Khojali tells the story of how cynical and inhuman people decided over the destiny of others."

Meanwhile, Lionel Zetter, Director of The European Azerbaijan Society (TEAS), pointed out that until today no solution has been found to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, despite international efforts. "Thus I hope the film will re-focus attention about this besieged region."

The film follows Lithuanian journalist Richard Lapaitis on a trip back to Azerbaijan 20 years after he covered the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and Khojali massacre as a war correspondent, a story, he says, that has haunted him since.

The documentary sees him re-unite with survivors of the tragedy, who recall their heart-rending stories as they escaped Armenian bombardment, losing many loved ones along an 'Endless Corridor' seeking safety.

But it also hears from the perpetrators of the massacre, Armenian commanders, their war strategies and reasoning. Despite several resolutions by the United Nations and other international bodies calling for the unconditional withdrawal, Armenia continues to occupy Nagorno-Karabakh and surrounding Azerbaijani provinces to this day.

The lunchtime event also saw the Swedish launch of the book "Khojali Witness of a War Crime: Armenia in the Dock". Editor Ian Peart said the book had two purposes: to present the humanity of the victims and to provide objective facts from an international point of view. "After reading this book, hopefully readers will ask themselves: 'what can I do to help?' We must never again see a repetition of such crimes."

The completed film is now being screened and distributed by international broadcasters.

SOURCE TEAS