Law Enforcement Torch Run Polar Plunge Season Kicks Off In Lake Michigan 2/19

22 Events Around State to Support Special Olympics Illinois Athletes

17 Feb, 2016, 10:07 ET from Special Olympics Illinois

CHICAGO, Feb. 17, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Polar Plunge will kick off its 2016 season with the SUPER Plunge this weekend in Evanston. It is the first of 22 Law Enforcement Torch Run Polar Plunges around the state (including 7 in Chicagoland) that will benefit Special Olympics Illinois.

The league of about 50 SUPER Plungers includes law enforcement officials, Special Olympics representatives and others. They will begin jumping into Lake Michigan at Clark Street Beach in Evanston at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 19. The Plunging elite will continue plunging once an hour for 24 hours until 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20.

Adventurous souls are invited to join law enforcement officers, and business/civic leaders and others from their community by donning bathing suits, costumes or any clothing of choice (just no wet suits!) to jump in a lake. Each Plunger must raise a minimum of $100 in donations.

This year features 2 NEW Plunges in Oak Brook and Macomb.

Plunge locations are:

February 20Evanston

February 21Palatine

February 27Carbondale, Carlyle, Mahomet/Champaign, Bloomington, Quincy

February 28Galesburg, Fox Lake

March 5Decatur, Manteno, Rend Lake, Rockford, Springfield, Effingham, Oak Brook

March 6Yorkville, Macomb

March 19Joliet, Lincoln

March 20Rock Island

For more information, to register for one of the Plunges, or to support a plunger, visit the Special Olympics Illinois website at http://www.plungeillinois.com. Plungers are invited to join the conversation and share who or what they will #PlungeFor on Facebook and Twitter.

All proceeds benefit the 22,000 athletes and 21,000 Young Athletes of Special Olympics Illinois.

The Illinois Law Enforcement Torch Run is the single largest year-round fund-raising vehicle benefiting Special Olympics Illinois.  This intrastate relay and its various fundraising projects have two goals: to raise money and increase public awareness for the athletes of Special Olympics.  Each year, more than 3,000 officers in Illinois run more than 1,500 miles carrying the Flame of Hope through the streets of their hometowns and deliver it to the State Summer Games in Normal in June.  Special Olympics Illinois is a year-round program of sports training and competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Special Olympics programs are now in more than 170 countries with 4.4 million athletes.

 

SOURCE Special Olympics Illinois



RELATED LINKS

http://www.soill.org/