MONEY TALKS: More Than Six in 10 Executives Are Willing to Negotiate Starting Compensation, Survey Shows

MENLO PARK, Calif., May 14, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Talented professionals who accept an initial job offer may be leaving money on the table, a new survey by The Creative Group suggests. More than six in 10 (63 percent) advertising and marketing executives interviewed said they are at least somewhat willing to negotiate compensation when extending a job offer to a top candidate versus 28 percent of respondents who are not.

The national survey was developed by The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service for interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals, and conducted by an independent research firm.

Advertising and marketing executives were asked, "When extending a job offer to a top candidate, how willing are you to negotiate compensation?" Their responses:



Very willing

23%

Somewhat willing

40%

Not very willing

14%

Not at all willing

14%

Don't know/no answer

9%


100%



View the research highlights.

"Job seekers often have more leverage than they realize when negotiating a starting salary," said Donna Farrugia, executive director of The Creative Group. "Businesses that have gone through the process of selecting a top candidate are motivated to hire that person, even if they have to sweeten the deal."

Farrugia warned, however, that salary negotiation isn't without its perils. "These conversations are delicate and can easily go off track," she said. "Applicants who thoroughly prepare are more likely to have positive outcomes."

The Creative Group offers five common salary negotiation mistakes and how to avoid them:

  1. Showing up unprepared. Enter negotiations with a solid understanding of current salary trends for your position and location. Review compensation sources, such as The Creative Group 2013 Salary Guide, to ensure you have realistic expectations.
  2. Playing games. Tactics like misleading a prospective employer about your current salary or other job offers in an effort to obtain higher pay almost always backfire. It's better to be honest about your situation.
  3. Making it all about you. Don't base your request for a larger starting salary on the fact that you want a new car or bigger down payment for a home. You'll make a much more compelling argument by talking about the value you can bring to the organization.
  4. Viewing money as the only object. Salary is just one part of the equation; a generous benefits package or opportunities to learn and grow with the company may compensate for a lower starting salary. Remember to look at the full picture when evaluating a job offer.
  5. Drawing a line in the sand. Giving ultimatums too early in the process may cause negotiations to fall apart. Instead, look for common ground and avoid taking an adversarial stance. How you conduct yourself during the negotiation process sets the tone for employment with the firm, and you want to start on the right foot.

About the Survey
The national study was developed by The Creative Group and conducted by an independent research firm. It is based on more than 500 telephone interviews -- approximately 375 with marketing executives randomly selected from companies with 100 or more employees and 125 with advertising executives randomly selected from agencies with 20 or more employees.

About The Creative Group
The Creative Group (TCG) specializes in placing a range of highly skilled interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals with a variety of firms on a project and full-time basis. For more information, visit www.creativegroup.com.

SOURCE The Creative Group



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