2014

National Magazine Inducts 10 Manufacturing Leaders Into the IW Manufacturing Hall of Fame

CLEVELAND, Dec. 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The editors of IndustryWeek have selected 10 honorees for the 2011 class of the IW Manufacturing Hall of Fame. IndustryWeek is the premiere publication serving executive and operations leaders in the manufacturing industry. IndustryWeek has a long history of acknowledging the leaders of manufacturing operations through distinguishing programs such as the IW 50, IW 500 and IW Best Plants.

Through the IW Manufacturing Hall of Fame, IndustryWeek now is extending recognition to individual leaders in the manufacturing community whose vision, leadership, and legacy not only provided value to their individual organizations but also beneficially impacted the larger business community and our society. A feature story in our December 2011 issue will highlight these achievements to the more than 120,000 subscribers of IndustryWeek and also will appear on the IndustryWeek Web site at: http://industryweek.com/articles/in_a_class_by_themselves_26170.aspx?cid=NLIWIT

IndustryWeek is pleased to highlight their accomplishments to our audience of manufacturing leaders.

The IW Manufacturing Hall of Fame is presented by Swagelok.

John Brown – As president and CEO of Stryker Corp. from 1977 to 2003 and as CEO from 2003 to 2004, Brown transformed a small Kalamazoo, Mich.-based manufacturer of hospital beds and cast cutters into one of the world's largest medical-device makers, with a portfolio of more than 55,000 products. During Brown's 27 years at the helm, Stryker achieved average annual earnings growth of 22%. Since January 2010, Brown has served as chairman emeritus of Stryker, which reported revenue of $7.3 billion for 2010—its 31st consecutive year of revenue growth.

Daniel DiMicco – As chairman and CEO of Nucor Corp., DiMicco not only is the leader of the nation's largest steelmaker but also has become a leading voice of the American steel industry and American manufacturing. DiMicco was named president and CEO of Charlotte-based Nucor in 2000, shepherding the company through a period of unprecedented growth as well as the harrowing recession of the late 2000s (during which Nucor hewed to its no-layoff philosophy). An outspoken critic of China's alleged steel dumping and currency manipulation, DiMicco has helped keep fair trade on the forefront of the public-policy agenda.

Armand Feigenbaum – Feigenbaum's work and ideas helped lay the foundation for the concept of total quality control. When the American Society for Quality (ASQ) named Feigenbaum an honorary board member in 1986, the society acknowledged him for a career in which "the precepts of total quality control were carefully laid out and tirelessly promulgated in the United States and around the world." The author of "Total Quality Control," Feigenbaum also is a pioneer in quality cost management, and the ASQ notes that his book "was the first text to characterize quality costs as the costs of prevention, appraisal, and internal and external failure."

Raymond Floyd – During his 42-year career as an executive and operations manager at ExxonMobil, General Motors and Suncor Energy, Floyd has helped some of the world's largest industrial sites and global multi-plant operations achieve best-in-class performance. His impressive resume includes two IndustryWeek Best Plants awards; a Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing; and a Shingo Research and Professional Publications Award for his book "Liquid Lean: Developing Lean Culture in the Process Industries."

Jay Forrester – Forrester is an award-winning inventor, author and professor whose research at MIT in the late 1950s led to the modern notion of supply chain management. He is one of the inventors of the digital control of machine tools, receiving a patent for the numerical-control servo-system in 1962. A pioneer in early digital-computer development, Forrester, 93, is a professor emeritus of management at MIT's Sloan School of Management.

Alan (A.G.) Lafley – Lafley served as president and CEO of Procter & Gamble from 2000 to 2009, capping a three-decade career with the company. At a time when P&G's results had been slipping, Lafley in the 2000s focused the company on core businesses and brands; faster-growing and higher-margin beauty, grooming and health care businesses; and winning in developing markets. When Lafley retired in 2010, P&G had more than doubled its sales since the beginning of the decade; the company's portfolio of billion-dollar brands had grown from 10 to 22; and P&G's market capitalization had more than doubled. His successor, Bob McDonald, called Lafley "one of the greatest CEOs, if not the greatest CEO, in the history of P&G."

Gordon Moore – Moore co-founded Intel Corp. in 1968, along with fellow Fairchild Semiconductor alum Robert Noyce. Moore served as CEO of Intel from 1975 until 1987, and was named chairman emeritus in 1997. Moore is widely known for coming up with "Moore's Law" in 1965, in which he predicted that computing power would double every year (he later updated it to two years). Moore's Law, according to Intel, "has become the guiding principle for the semiconductor industry to deliver ever-more-powerful chips while decreasing the cost of electronics."

Richard MorelyMorley is best known as the father of the programmable logic controller. An engineer, author, inventor and consultant, Morley holds more than 20 U.S. and foreign patents, including patents for magnetic thin film, the hand-held terminal and the floppy disk. A member of the Automation Hall of Fame (a group that includes W. Edwards Deming), Morley has been a pioneer in the fields of computer design, artificial intelligence, automation, robotics/motors and technology trend forecasting.

Alan Mulally – Since taking over as president and CEO of Ford Motor Co. in September 2006, Mulally has led the automaker from the brink of bankruptcy to profitability, respectability and stability. However, he might always be best known for the fact that Ford said "no" to government bailout funds, thanks to the actions he took to finance a corporate restructuring two years prior to the recession. A former Boeing executive, Mulally has become the face of the auto industry's renaissance, and recently unveiled a bold strategy to increase Ford's global sales from 5.3 million vehicles in 2010 to 8 million by mid-decade.

John Shook – As an author, keynote speaker, former Toyota employee, and current chairman and CEO of the Lean Enterprise Institute, Shook has enthusiastically spread the principles of the Toyota Production System and lean manufacturing to operations throughout the world. Shook learned about lean management during his decade-long career with Toyota in Japan and the United States, and became the company's first American kacho (manager) in Japan. As co-author of the Shingo Prize-winning book "Learning to See," Shook helped introduce the world to value-stream mapping. The Lean Enterprise Institute describes Shook as "a true sensei."

IndustryWeek  | 1300 East Ninth Street  |  Cleveland, Ohio 44114  |  www.industryweek.com

Contact: John Cable, 216.931.9750, josh.cable@penton.com

SOURCE Penton Media Inc.



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