New Study Finds Americans Aren't Doing Enough to Prevent Cold & Flu

While Efforts to Clean Surfaces and Hands Continue, New Report Finds Only 13 Percent of Americans Protect the Air They Breathe; Fellowes Introduces Four Step Process

Jan 29, 2014, 10:06 ET from Fellowes, Inc.

ITASCA, Ill., Jan. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Washing your hands and disinfecting indoor surfaces are not enough to protect your home this cold and flu season. Indoor air is up to five times more polluted than outdoor air,1 and our homes are teeming with airborne germs and viruses, the leading causes of cold and flu.2 Despite these facts, the 2014 Cold and Flu Report from Fellowes found only 13 percent of American adults use an air purifier as part of their cold and flu prevention arsenal.3

"According to the 2014 Cold and Flu Report, nearly half of Americans are concerned about getting sick this time of year, yet most don't realize that after a cough or sneeze, some viruses stay suspended in the air for hours before landing on surfaces,4" said Nancy Heaton, Director of Global Marketing, Business Machines, Fellowes, Inc. "What's more, even without a cough or sneeze to propel it, the flu can spread to people up to six feet away.That's why it's so important to make sure you're doing all that you can to combat these airborne germs in your home."

While frequent hand washing and disinfecting surfaces have become synonymous with cold and flu prevention, a four step process is truly necessary to reducing the risk of cold and flu illness in the home:

  1. Ask about a flu shot
  2. Wash and sanitize hands regularly
  3. Wipe down surfaces with powerful disinfectants
  4. Purify the air indoors

Fellowes® AeraMaxTM air purifiers are extremely effective at removing influenza and cold viruses from indoor air.6 The new AeraMax air purifiers also boast:

  • True HEPA Filters that safely remove 99.97% of airborne particles, including: viruses, germs, dust, mold, pollen, ragweed, pet dander and cigarette smoke
  • Effortless technology that offers total innovation and convenience with:
    • Ultra Quiet operation
    • Automatic filter change indicators that alert you when the filter needs to be replaced
    • Automatic sensor that monitors the air quality and automatically adjusts the fan speed to keep your air purified
    • User-friendly touch screen technology with back-lit performance LEDs
  • Independent certifications from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and the California Air Resource Board (CARB), Certified asthma & allergy friendly™ by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), UL Listed and Energy Star-certified (for the 200 and 300 models). 

The AeraMaxTM line of products are available on Amazon.com  and Best Buy for a suggested retail value ranging from $119.99 to $239.99. For more information on Fellowes' state-of-the-art air purifiers, visit www.fellowes.com.

About Fellowes, Inc.
Fellowes, Inc. offers an extensive range of products to equip the home and workspace, including paper shredders, air purifiers, binders, laminators, desktop accessories and record storage solutions. Founded in 1917 by Harry Fellowes and headquartered in Itasca, Illinois, Fellowes, Inc. employs more than 1,200 people throughout the world and has operations in 20 countries. Fellowes products are now readily available in over 100 countries across the globe. For more information, visit www.fellowes.com.



1.

Indoor Air. (2011, March 11). EPA. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://www.epa.gov/region1/communities/indoorair.html

2.

Bacteria and Viruses. American Lung Association. Retrieved January 15, 2014 from http://www.lung.org/healthy-air/home/resources/bacteria-and-viruses.html

3.

Fellowes 2014 Cold and Flu Report. Results are based on 1,000 surveys completed American adults, 18+ on behalf of the Fellowes, Inc. between December 10 - 12 Dec., 2013 by Toluna Research. Respondents were drawn from a national online panel maintained by Toluna, and completed the survey online.

4.

Bardi, J. S. (2009, June 14). The Gross Science of a Cough and a Sneeze. LiveScience. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://www.livescience.com/3686-gross-science-cough-sneeze.html

5.

How Flu Spreads. (2013, September 12). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm

6.

Independent testing by Airmid Heathgroup



 

For more information contact:
Kerry Robinson
GolinHarris
(312) 729-4141
krobinson@golinharris.com

SOURCE Fellowes, Inc.



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