Presidential candidates should address childhood obesity and bullying, poll says

Adults agree on top children's health issues regardless of political party affiliation, according to U-M's National Poll on Children's Health

ANN ARBOR, Mich., June 18, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- During this presidential election season, there will be plenty of debate between the candidates on the issues. But when it comes to childhood health concerns, a new poll shows many adults agree on the top priorities they want to see the candidates address: childhood obesity and bullying.

The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health recently asked adults to name the top child health concerns that the presidential candidates should address.

In a survey of more than 2,100 adults, participants selected the single most important child health issue from a list of 24 common child health concerns. Overall, childhood obesity was ranked highest, followed by bullying, drug abuse and child abuse and neglect.

In the poll, about one in six adults (17 percent) ranked childhood obesity first, and one in 7 (15 percent) put bullying as the top concern. Drug abuse was ranked highest by 11 percent and 8 percent chose child abuse and neglect. Together, these four priorities were the choice of over half of U.S. adults.

Answers did not differ based on the respondents' political party affiliation or race/ethnicity.

"Healthcare reform is a major topic during this election season, but much of that focuses on uninsured adults and the costs of healthcare. The health of children usually is not the focus of the political talk," says Matthew M. Davis M.D., M.A.P.P., director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.  But many serious health problems for adults stem from behaviors and patterns that begin in childhood—for instance, obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and depression, Davis says, which reinforces the need for policies of early intervention.

"By asking about children's health and health policy, we hope to bring the public's voice to the policymakers. We found that no matter their politics or race/ethnicity, adults in the US agree on these top child health priorities," says Davis, who also is associate professor in the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit and the Division of General Medicine at the U-M Medical School, and associate professor of Public Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

Davis says the high ranking of childhood obesity is consistent with previous poll results and other national data, and reinforces the need for policies to help children and parents.

"The federal government is currently responsible for many programs that may have an impact on childhood obesity, like school lunches, encouragement of physical activity and subsidies for specific food items," Davis says. "But the public is aware that more may be needed, and seems eager to hear from presidential candidates that they've made this a priority."

The public also recognizes that bullying, whether on the playground, at school or even online, also can lead to both immediate and lasting health problems for children.

"These are common issues that we can agree on, no matter your choice of presidential candidates. These four issues ­-- childhood obesity, bullying, drug abuse and child abuse and neglect – were the choice of more than half of the adults that we polled," Davis says.

Broadcast-quality video is available on request. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL7PkpOMQe0

Full report: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health
http://mottnpch.org/reports-surveys/public-wants-presidential-candidates-address-childhood-obesity-bullying

Website: Check out the Poll's new website: MottNPCH.org. You can search and browse over 60 NPCH Reports, suggest topics for future polls, share your opinion in a quick poll, and view information on popular topics. The National Poll on Children's Health team welcomes feedback on the new website, including features you'd like to see added. To share feedback, e-mail NPCH@med.umich.edu.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mottnpch

Twitter: @MottNPCH

Purpose/Funding: The C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health – based at the Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit at the University of Michigan and funded by the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and the University of Michigan Health System – is designed to measure major health care issues and trends for U.S. children.

Data Source: This report presents findings from a nationally representative household survey conducted exclusively by Knowledge Networks, Inc. (KN), for C.S. Mott Children's Hospital via a method used in many published studies. The survey was administered in May 2012 to a randomly selected, stratified group of adults age 18 or older (n=2,144), from the KN standing panel that closely resembles the U.S. population. The sample was subsequently weighted to reflect population figures from the Census Bureau. The survey completion rate was 62 percent among panel members contacted to participate. The margin of error is +/-2 to 3 percentage points.

To learn more about Knowledge Networks, visit www.knowledgenetworks.com.

Findings from the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health do not represent the opinions of the investigators or the opinions of the University of Michigan. 

SOURCE University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health



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