2014

Rice Eaters Have Healthier Diets A growing consensus of rice as a healthy food in U.S. diet

SAN DIEGO, April 23, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Eating white or brown rice helps improve diet and manage weight and other risk factors for disease, according to results from a study presented today at the Experimental Biology 2012 conference, in San Diego, CA.

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According to Hanqi Luo, research scientist at Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition, there are many reasons to encourage consumers to eat rice. "Rice is a staple enjoyed by most of the world.  Our research shows that it contributes important nutrients to the U.S. diet, such as folate, iron and potassium, and may help improve overall diet quality and reduce the risk of becoming overweight."

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2008, the Tufts researchers compared the diets of more than 8,000 adults and children who reported eating rice versus those who reported not eating rice, for important health parameters, including risk for obesity, cholesterol levels and diet quality.

The results show that rice eaters, including children and adults, consume significantly more folate, iron, potassium, vitamins B6, B12 and A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin D, phosphorus, magnesium, copper and zinc. Potassium and vitamind D are identified in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as two important nutrients for the the general population. Growing research supports higher daily intake of vitamin D as beneficial.  Also, folic acid fortification of grains is responsible for a 27% decrease in certain birth defects, according to the Centers for Disease Control.(1)

Rice eaters also consumed a lower percentage of calories from fat and saturated fat compared to those who did not eat rice.  In addition, adults who eat rice are less likely to be overweight or obese and have a smaller waist circumference.

"This study builds on and further confirms previous published rice studies that demonstrate that individuals who consume rice are less likely to be overweight and enjoy a healthier diet than those who don't consume rice," explained Luo.  "And for the first time, there are data to support that rice is a positive addition to U.S. children's diets, which is important given the obesity epidemic. Taken together, the results suggest that the type of grain, as well as amount of grain, consumed may be an important influence on nutritional status," she concluded.

Two previous published studies have shown the positive contribution of rice to the U.S. diet.  A 2009 observational study using NHANES datasets and Continuing Survey of Food intake by Individuals (CSFII), found that rice eaters consumed significantly less fat and saturated fat and consumed more iron, potassium, fiber, meat, vegetables and grains.(2)  A follow-up study in 2010, also using NHANES datasets, included children in the study group and further confirmed that rice consumption was associated with greater intake of a range of healthier foods and nutrients.(3) 

Rice is a naturally nutritious grain that provides about 100 calories per half-cup cooked serving.  Brown rice is a 100% whole grain food and white rice is enriched with important nutrients including folic acid and iron. Wild rice, which was also included in this study, is a 100% whole grain. In addition, rice is versatile, safe for those with gluten or other wheat allergies and is enjoyed by children and adults, alike.

The Tufts study was funded by the Rice Foundation, which serves as the independent research and education program arm for the rice industry. 

About USA Rice Federation

The USA Rice Federation is the global advocate for the U.S. rice industry, conducting programs to inform consumers about domestically-grown rice. U.S. farmers produce an abundance of short, medium and long grain rice, as well as organic and specialty rices including jasmine, basmati, Arborio, red aromatic and black japonica, among others.  Farmers in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas grow some 20 billion pounds of rice each year according to the highest quality standards.  Eighty five percent of the rice Americans consume is grown in the USA. Look for the U.S. rice industry's "Grown in the U.S." logo on packages of 100% domestically-grown rice.

About Experimental Biology (EB) 2012

EB 2012 is a meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.  EB is an annual gathering of six scientific societies that this year is expected to draw 13,000-plus independent scientists and exhibitors. The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) is a co-sponsor of the meeting, along with the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), American Physiological Society (APS), American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP), American Society for Nutrition (ASN) and the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET).

(1) Center for Disease Prevention (2009). Retrieved April 18, 2012 from http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2009/r09105.htm  

(2) J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109:1719-1727

(2) Fulgoni et al. Nutrition Today 2010;45:262-272

Contacts:




Marcie Klein

 Anne Banville

(212) 941-1414

(703) 236-1465

mklein@pollock-pr.com

abanville@usarice.com

SOURCE USA Rice Federation



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